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BANGKOK 22 April 2019 03:04

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  2. Let them impeach Trump. It doesn’t matter, it is better they do it right away than drag it out. Once that is out Of the way he can then win the next election. It’s funny to watch.
  3. A neigbour surely should be able to help...for a lot less.. Bills can be paid at 7/11 or Lotus, get a Thai dictionary and take that to the market....
  4. May out, Thai hopes rest on mixed pair at Asia Championships By LERPONG AMSA-NGIAM THE NATION Sapsiree Taerattanachai (L) and Dechapol Puavaranukroh (R) / EPA Photo RED-HOT mixed doubles duo Dechapol Puavaranukroh and Sapsiree Taerattanachai will spearhead Thailand’s challenge at the Badminton Asia Championships after Ratchanok “May” Intanon withdrew to focus on the Sudirman Cup. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1096344-may-out-thai-hopes-rest-on-mixed-pair-at-asia-championships /
  5. May out, Thai hopes rest on mixed pair at Asia Championships By LERPONG AMSA-NGIAM THE NATION Sapsiree Taerattanachai (L) and Dechapol Puavaranukroh (R) / EPA Photo RED-HOT mixed doubles duo Dechapol Puavaranukroh and Sapsiree Taerattanachai will spearhead Thailand’s challenge at the Badminton Asia Championships after Ratchanok “May” Intanon withdrew to focus on the Sudirman Cup. The world No 4 pair, who upset world No 1 Zheng Siwei and Huang Yaqiong of China en route to their Singapore Open victory earlier this month, are now the best hope for Thailand in the continent’s top tournament, starting tomorrow in Wuhan, China. The pair will open their account against Saurabh Sharma and Anoushka Parikh of India and will seek to maintain their top form and go deep in a tournament where they were runners-up in 2017, losing to Huang and Lukai in the final. While 2015 champion Ratchanok opted to skip the event for the mixed team Sudirman Cup, in Nanning from May 19-26, three other Thai women will represent the Kingdom this week. World No 20 and Thai No 2 Pornpawee Chochuwong will carry Thai hopes in the women’s singles where she opens her campaign against Lee Ying Ying of Malaysia. World No 24 Busanan Ongbamrungphan faces Yeo Jia Min of Singapore and Nitchaon Jindapol has a daunting task against fifth-seeded He Bingjiao of China. With world and defending champion No 1 Tai Tzu Ying not taking part, Chen Yufei of China, last year’s runner-up, and 2017 world champion Nozomi Okuhara of Japan are the top two seeds. In the men’s singles, world No 1 and reigning champion Kento Momota of Japan as well as top Chinese stars Lin Dan, a four-time champion here, 2017 winner Chen Long and world No 2 Shi Yuqi are strong contenders. Thailand’s top four – Khosit Phetpradab, No 17, Kantaphon Wangcharoen, No 18, Suppanyu Avihingsanon, No 28 and Sittthikom Thammasin, No 30 – will attempt to cause some damage. Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/sports/30368087 -- © Copyright The Nation 2019-04-22
  6. Not really is it. Most Governments have conformity across the board, Thailand as we know just makes stuff up depending on who it is and how they feel or whether its a "good day" or not The OP is in his seventies and being asked to rush around for something that isn't really required is likely to make his health worse. .
  7. Not much choice is there. Ya get us or the Chinese. Collateral damage. The world was way worse before we took over.
  8. Medical marijuana move ‘not enough’ By PRATCH RUJIVANAROM THE NATION BURI RAM Many people gather to observe a fullgrown cannabis plant, which is exhibited at the medical cannabis fair “Pan Buriram”, which was held from Friday until yesterday in Buri Ram province. Photo Pratch Rujivanarom ACTIVISTS SEEK MORE MEASURES TO FACILITATE USE OF CANNABINOID MEDICINES MORE LEGAL measures to further liberalise medical cannabis are required, campaigners stressed, so as to ensure that patients can freely and easily access affordable and quality cannabinoid medicines. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1096343-medical-marijuana-move-‘not-enough’/
  9. Medical marijuana move ‘not enough’ By PRATCH RUJIVANAROM THE NATION BURI RAM Many people gather to observe a fullgrown cannabis plant, which is exhibited at the medical cannabis fair “Pan Buriram”, which was held from Friday until yesterday in Buri Ram province. Photo Pratch Rujivanarom ACTIVISTS SEEK MORE MEASURES TO FACILITATE USE OF CANNABINOID MEDICINES MORE LEGAL measures to further liberalise medical cannabis are required, campaigners stressed, so as to ensure that patients can freely and easily access affordable and quality cannabinoid medicines. Even though Thailand has already legalised the use of cannabis for medical purpose since February, medical experts and prominent politicians cautioned that there were still many legal problems obstructing the general public from gaining full benefit from medical cannabis legalisation. They said that unless the government and relevant official agencies came out with additional legislative reform and the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) used the special power under Article 44 of the interim charter to unlock these legal obstructions, the patients may have to rely on expensive imported medicines and may even face persecution for illegal use of cannabis. Three major legal obstacles were identified: excessively high qualifications and standards for those permitted to grow cannabis and produce medicines from it; a complicated registration process for patients and medical practitioners using cannabinoid medicines; and lack of clarity from the authorities on how it would deal with those who fail to apply for permission to legally use cannabis for medical purpose within the set deadline. Newin Chidchob, Bhumjaithai Party co-founder and president of Thai football league’s Buriram United, said on Saturday that though the recent medical cannabis legalisation had opened up huge opportunities for Thai society to enhance its healthcare standards with affordable and effective medicines from cannabis and gain substantial profit by developing cannabinoid medicines and other products from cannabis. However, Newin emphasised that currently the reformed laws on medical cannabis legalisation are far from perfect and even have the potential to cause more problems in the future. “The most urgent issue on medical cannabis right now is that even though the 90-day amnesty period allowing patients using cannabinoid medicines to register for official permission to use medical cannabis will end on May 19, only a few patients have shown up for registration,” he addressed. He said it is estimated that at least 1 million patients were covertly using cannabinoid medicines in Thailand, but according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as of last Monday only 1,053 patients had registered to seek permission to possess and use cannabinoid medicines. “I am very concerned that when the deadline for medical cannabis registration ends, a large number of patients, who are still not registered with the FDA, will be at risk of being arrested for possessing cannabis illegally because the current narcotics law still considers cannabis an illicit drug,” Newin said. Patients keeping away “Therefore, I would like to urge the Public Health Ministry and Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha to urgently come out with a measure to tackle this problem by issuing an NCPO order to protect these patients from being prosecuted and allow them to continue using cannabinoid medication for their treatment.” Newin, who was also co-hosting the medical cannabis fair “Pan Buriram”, revealed that the medical cannabis registration one-stop-service centre was open at the fair’s venue at the Chang International Circuit from Friday until yesterday for the convenience of patients attending the fair. According to the Buri Ram Provincial Public Health Office, more than 6,000 people showed up at the one-stop-service centre on the first two days of the event, while 2,724 of them obtained the permission. The lack of information to the public on registration as well as the complicated registration procedure were blamed by many patients as the major reasons for the low registration rate of the patients, who are using cannabis as medicine. Anucha Sukniran, a cannabinoid medicine user from Nakhon Pathom province, disclosed that he had tried to register for use of medical cannabis in his province, but failed because of difficulties in the required documents. “It was quite hard to register for cannabis usage in my hometown, as I did not get proper information on how to prepare the documents and where to go to submit the application, so I attended the fair to learn more about medical cannabis and registered here instead,” Anucha said. “I am glad that the government has finally legalised the use of cannabis for medical purpose, as I am now relying on a cannabis extract to relieve chronic insomnia, which has greatly improved the quality of my life.” Meanwhile, traditional cannabis medicine producer, Bantoon Niyamapa, widely known as “Lung Tu”, also pointed out that the current FDA regulations on the qualifications of eligible persons, organisations or institutes that can apply for the permission to plant cannabis and produce cannabinoid medicines are too strict. He said this would eventually prevent ordinary citizens from accessing cheap cannabinoid medicines. “The most important thing we need to ensure after legalising medical cannabis is to guarantee that people can get affordable and effective medicines, which can be done by allowing all people to grow cannabis and use it as herbal medicine at their home,” Bantoon said. “It is the fundamental right of all people to have easy access to their required medicines. I am trying to promote this right by educating people to grow their own cannabis and learn how to use it as medicine, but the laws are still the main obstacle.” He cautioned that the excessively high qualifications for official permission to grow and produce medicines from cannabis favour giant transnational pharmaceutical corporates to monopolise the Thai cannabinoid medicine market, which will eventually force people to rely on their expensive imported medicines. Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30368070 -- © Copyright The Nation 2019-04-22
  10. Hello all. Pleasure to meet everyone. Seems like a wonderful site here!
  11. It's exactly land border activity that triggers a red flag in an airport. If one exits repeatedly at Nong Khai every 60/90 days, on his last day of permission of stay, it's quite obvious what that person is doing, even to a school student. I'm not discussing the legality of it, I am just stating what raises red flags when an IO flips through the passport.
  12. It is not unusual for OPM in Wash D.C. to take a long time to answer even emai---took them 9 months to get me the forms and info to change some things for me till I got the personal phone number of a clerk who then expedited my requests. Better to take him to the OPM Office across the street from the US Embassy in BKK https://th.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/federal-benefits/office-personnel-management/
  13. Dream on brexit didnt happen and your £10k out of pocket and counting,front or back door you wont get your £10k back,yippppppeeee can the wife go back to work in the "office"
  14. to continue: Thailand Live Monday 22 Apr 2019 https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1096342-thailand-live-monday-22-apr-2019/
  15. And before if you spent the 800K over 9 months it needed replacing. If you want to bring all the money in by one transfer on day 1 you need to transfer in an extra 3 months living expenses. If you put 800K in an account and leave it you still need other funds to cover your living expenses. One way or another you need 800K plus living expenses, now and before. It was not a "loophole" - the rule was "income." It is a re-write of history to call everything that was standard, accepted policy for years/decades a "loophole," and to try to paint us as having "gotten away with something," before. So before you could use an embassy letter to claim you were in receipt of 65K pm month (gross) when infact you only received 60K, BUT now you have to prove you actually receive 65K. That is a massive gaping "LOOPHOLE". The rules have not changed. They've been added to. Another way to prove income has been provided for those that can't get embassy letters. One way or another people still needed to get their income to the country. Agreed they had flexibility before, but at least they still have a way of proving income. If they don't spend all the money they can always send it back periodically. To qualify for the extension you need a minimum income of 65K pm. That has not changed. The fact you have to prove you actual have 65K pm going into your bank, proves you needed an actual income of 65K before. Unfortunately that "LOOPHOLE" has closed. No they didn't. Immigration added an option to solve a problem. It might have created other problems for some, but IMO it's better than nothing. Without this new option many more would be paying out for agents or moving on. The retirement criteria has changed in the past and will change again in the future. Whenever changes happen someone is going to be shut out. At best you get a 1 year stay with no guarantee of the criteria being the same the next year. That is just something we all have to accept.
  16. UPDATE: Bombs kill more than 200 in Sri Lankan churches, hotels on Easter Sunday By Ranga Sirilal and Shihar Aneez A crime scene official inspects the site of a bomb blast inside a church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer COLOMBO (Reuters) - More than 200 people were killed and at least 450 injured in bomb blasts that ripped through churches and luxury hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, the first major attack on the Indian Ocean island since the end of a civil war 10 years ago. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1096319-at-least-156-dead-hundreds-injured-in-multiple-blasts-at-churches-hotels-on-easter-sunday/?do=findComment&comment=14065633
  17. UPDATE: Bombs kill more than 200 in Sri Lankan churches, hotels on Easter Sunday By Ranga Sirilal and Shihar Aneez A crime scene official inspects the site of a bomb blast inside a church in Negombo, Sri Lanka April 21, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer COLOMBO (Reuters) - More than 200 people were killed and at least 450 injured in bomb blasts that ripped through churches and luxury hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, the first major attack on the Indian Ocean island since the end of a civil war 10 years ago. The government declared a curfew in Colombo and blocked access to social media and messaging sites, including Facebook and WhatsApp. It was unclear when the curfew would be lifted. But in a sign that the attacks on three churches and four hotels could lead to communal violence, police reported on Sunday night that there had been a petrol bomb attack on a mosque in the northwestern district of Puttalum and arson attacks on two shops owned by Muslims in the western district of Kalutara. The government has acknowledged that it had "prior information" of attacks on churches involving a little known local Islamist group but didn't do enough about it. Out of Sri Lanka's total population of around 22 million, 70 percent are Buddhist, 12.6 percent Hindu, 9.7 percent Muslim and 7.6 percent Christian, according to the country's 2012 census. In February-March last year, there were a series of religious clashes between Sinhalese Buddhists and Muslims in the towns of Ampara and Kandy. POLICE KILLED On Sunday afternoon, three police officers were killed during a security forces raid on a house in theSri Lankan capital several hours after the attacks, many of which officials said were suicide bomb explosions. Police reported an explosion at the house. Thirteen arrests have been made, all of whom are Sri Lankans, police said. "Altogether, we have information of 207 dead from all hospitals. According to the information as of now we have 450 injured people admitted to hospitals," police spokesman Ruwan Gunasekera told reporters. Government officials said that 32 foreigners were killed and 30 injured in the explosions that tore through congregations and gatherings in hotels in Colombo, Negombo and Batticaloa. They included five British people, two of whom had dual U.S. citizenship, and three Indians, according to officials in those countries. Also among the fatalities were three people from Denmark, two from Turkey, and one from Portugal,Sri Lankan officials said. There were also Chinese and Dutch among the dead, according to media reports. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said U.S. nationals were among those killed, but did not give details. PRIOR INFORMATION There were no immediate claims of responsibility for the attacks in a country which was at war for decades with Tamil separatists until 2009, a time when bomb blasts in the capital were common. Prime Minister Ranil Wickremsinghe acknowledged that the government had some "prior information of the attack", though ministers were not told. He said there wasn't an adequate response and there needed to be an inquiry into how the information was used. He also said the government needs to look at the international links of a local militant group. Agence France Presse reported that it had seen documents showing that Sri Lanka's police chief Pujuth Jayasundara issued an intelligence alert to top officers 10 days ago, warning that suicide bombers planned to hit "prominent churches". He cited a foreign intelligence service as reporting that a little-known Islamist group was involved. A Sri Lanka police spokesman said he was not aware of the intelligence report. BLOOD ON CHURCH PEWS Dozens were killed in one of the blasts at St. Sebastian's Gothic-style Catholic church in Katuwapitiya, north of Colombo. Gunasekera said the police suspected a suicide attack there. Pictures from the site showed bodies on the ground, blood on the church pews and a destroyed roof. Local media reported 25 people were also killed in an attack on an evangelical church in Batticaloa in Eastern Province. The hotels hit in Colombo were the Shangri-La, the Kingsbury, the Cinnamon Grand and the Tropical Inn near the national zoo. There was no word on casualties in the hotels, but a witness told local TV he saw some body parts, including a severed head, lying on the ground beside the Tropical Inn. The first six explosions were all reported within a short period in the morning just as church services were starting. One of the explosions was at St. Anthony's Shrine, a Catholic church in Kochcikade, Colombo, a tourist landmark. The explosion at the Tropical Inn happened later and there was an eighth explosion at the house that was the subject of the police raid in Colombo. "I strongly condemn the cowardly attacks on our people today. I call upon all Sri Lankans during this tragic time to remain united and strong," said Sri Lanka's prime minister in a Tweet. "Please avoid propagating unverified reports and speculation. The government is taking immediate steps to contain this situation." President Maithripala Sirisena said he had ordered the police special task force and military to investigate who was behind the attacks and their agenda. The military was deployed, a military spokesman said, and security stepped up at Colombo's international airport. Schools, universities and the Colombo Stock Exchange will be closed on Monday as the island state tries to recover from the attacks. ATTACKS ON CHRISTIANS The Christian community had already felt under pressure in Sri Lanka in recent years. Last year, there were 86 verified incidents of discrimination, threats and violence against Christians, according to the National Christian Evangelical Alliance of Sri Lanka (NCEASL), which represents more than 200 churches and other Christian organisations. This year, the NCEASL recorded 26 such incidents, including one in which Buddhist monks allegedly attempted to disrupt a Sunday worship service, with the last one reported on March 25. The heads of major governments condemned the attacks. U.S. President Donald Trump said America offered "heartfelt condolences" to the Sri Lankan people and stood ready to help, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said there was "no place for such barbarism in our region", and Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said the bombings were "an assault on all of humanity". Pope Francis, addressing people in St. Peter's Square, said: "I wish to express my affectionate closeness to the Christian community, hit while it was gathered in prayer, and to all the victims of such cruel violence." Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Easter Day after his death on the cross. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern of New Zealand, where a gunman shot 50 people dead in two mosques last month, said in a statement: "Collectively we must find the will and the answers to end such violence." (Writing by John Chambers and Martin Howell; Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan, William Maclean) -- © Copyright Reuters 2019-04-22
  18. That is part of why I wondered about this and thought a simple approach in such a situation would be to simply account for yearly earnings and pay Thai taxes accordingly. If one owns a (foreign) business which generates income each year, and one's ownership included a non-zero amount of "work" to maintain its existence, then that seems like taxable income while residing in Thailand. Thus, taxes would be owed (even though the clients and work takes place outside of Thailand). So, I'm wondering if said taxes are paid on business income doesn't that provide de facto evidence of "work" and therefore the requirement of a work permit (that one can't get in that situation)? Seems like a Catch 22. If the business isn't maintained, then there is no long-term financial viability of living in Thailand. But, the business can't be maintained without working and that can't be done without a work permit. And, no work permit can be granted to oneself. I am the owner and only employee.
  19. Would that be the popcorn left over from the Brexiteer March 29 party?
  20. Thais complain about these issues as well if you look at their news and forums. They want Western ideals, just look at any burger king or KFC, full of thais
  21. Total BS imho....every game is played to win in the Premiership.
  22. Two sides to every storey, as is common here the women lie and steal so we dont know why they divorced. She's young, why cant she get a job, study for qualifications, what about her family, Thais supposedly help family members. Who paid for the property...the man is old and hasn't a chance to recoup his life savings that he very possibly paid for the land. What was in the divorce agreement. If he bought before they were married she shouldn't really get anything, if after then 50%...thats Thai law so she cant complain.
  23. The trump supporters sound more desperate every day no matter who you support this report is a very damming document of this administration without support in Congress to impeach is a waste of time plenty of issues this guy is failing at focus on those!
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