Jump to content
BANGKOK 23 May 2019 05:58

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. fools; one area is 'key' one day and not the next ? should apply across the board and not matter if someone is an 'expert'
  3. Some fanboys on here, had me believe the election was 100% legitimate, and in no way rigged ! This news does surprise me.
  4. Widen your scope and you won't need a telescope to find them for a lot less than 50000bht a month................. very true i have met many nice ladies on the internet and never paid a cent for any of them. sure they may be trying to play the long game, and of course i pay for everything should we go out or go on holidays.
  5. My biggest concern is Trump typing nonsense on Twitter and the other party(ies) deciding to launch first.
  6. Sunia Phasuk very good article, but be careful watch your back.
  7. Judge rules against Trump, paves way for banks to provide his business records to Congress By Brendan Pierson FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump reacts as he speaks at the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride event after the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1102262-judge-rules-against-trump-paves-way-for-banks-to-provide-his-business-records-to-congress/
  8. The whole idea of the referendum was an attempt to heal a schism in the Tory party. That worked well didn’t it?!
  9. why is it so difficult to believe and accept ? military governments are B A D
  10. Judge rules against Trump, paves way for banks to provide his business records to Congress By Brendan Pierson FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump reacts as he speaks at the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride event after the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. In a decision read from the bench after hearing arguments, U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos in New York said Congress has the legal authority to demand the records, clearing the way for the banks to comply with subpoenas issued to them by two U.S. House of Representatives committees last month. The committees have agreed not to enforce the subpoenas for seven days, the judge said. It was the second time in three days that a judge had ruled against the Republican president in his fight with Democrats and Trump's lawyers were expected to appeal both decisions. Ramos said he would not suspend his decision pending appeal. Some Democratic lawmakers welcomed the decision. "So far, I think the president would be wise to come to the realization that our legitimate areas of inquiry are going to be supported by the courts," Representative Dan Kildee, a Michigan Democrat and member of the House Ways and Means Committee, told Reuters in an interview. Representative Brad Sherman, a Democratic member of the financial services committee, was more cautious, telling Reuters in an interview that he expected the decision would be appealed. Asked if lawmakers should be satisfied that they will get the information they seek, Sherman said, "I'll believe it when I see it out of the U.S. Supreme Court." The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Deutsche Bank said it would abide by the court's decision. Capital One did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Trump, who is seeking re-election next year, has aggressively sought to defy congressional oversight of his administration since Democrats took control of the House in January. Ramos said that the committees had the power to issue the subpoenas under Congress' "broad" power to conduct investigations to further legislation. He also rejected Trump's argument that they were barred by a federal financial privacy law, the Right to Financial Privacy Act, saying the law does not apply to congressional investigations. Trump said last month that the administration was "fighting all the subpoenas" issued by the House, hardening his position after the release of a redacted report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller on how Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. election to help Trump and on the president's attempts to impede the investigation. "We remain committed to providing appropriate information to all authorized investigations and will abide by a court order regarding such investigations," Deutsche Bank spokeswoman Kerrie McHugh said in an emailed statement after the ruling. Lawyers for the Trump family members and the Trump Organization declined to comment on the decision. Some parts of the subpoenas have been included in court filings. The subpoena on Deutsche Bank seeks extensive records of accounts, transactions and investments linked to Trump, his three oldest children, their immediate family members and several Trump Organization entities, as well as records of ties they might have to foreign entities. Deutsche Bank has long been a principal lender for Trump's real estate business and a 2017 disclosure form showed that Trump had at least $130 million of liabilities to the bank. The subpoena on Capital One seeks records related to multiple entities tied to the Trump Organization's hotel business. In March, before issuing their subpoena, Democratic lawmakers asked Capital One for documents concerning potential conflicts of interest tied to Trump's Washington hotel and other business interests since he became president in January 2017. Trump, his adult children, Donald Jr., Eric and Ivanka, and the Trump Organization had sought a preliminary injunction to prevent Deutsche Bank complying with the subpoenas from the House Financial Services Committee and the House Intelligence Committee, and Capital One from complying with a subpoena from the Financial Services Committee. In a lawsuit filed on April 29, lawyers for the Trumps argued that the subpoenas were too broad, and that Democrats are hoping they will "stumble upon something" that could be used for political attacks on the president. Patrick Strawbridge, a lawyer for Trump, said at Wednesday's hearing that the subpoenas were "the epitome of an inquiry into private or personal matters," and that the House committees were reaching beyond their role as legislators. Douglas Letter, a lawyer for the committees, said the subpoenas were part of a "very serious investigation on behalf of the American people" that could lead to legislation aimed at reducing foreign influence in U.S. politics. He denied that it was intended to target Trump personally. "He clearly sees us as some sort of nuisance," Letter said. The banks are the only defendants in the case, but the House committees intervened to oppose Trump's effort to block the subpoenas. Representative Maxine Waters, who chairs the House Financial Services Committee, told reporters after the lawsuit was filed that Trump had "cast a gauntlet." "We will fight him," she said. On Monday, a federal judge in Washington ruled against the president in a similar case, finding that Trump's accounting firm, Mazars LLP, must comply with a congressional subpoena for Trump's financial records. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta found that Congress was "not engaged in a fishing expedition" for the President's financial records when it subpoenaed Mazars and said that documents obtained might assist Congress in passing laws and performing other core functions. Trump called Mehta's decision "crazy" and "totally the wrong decision by obviously an Obama-appointed judge," referring to Trump's Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama. Ramos, the judge in the New York case, was also appointed by Obama. (Reporting by Brendan Pierson in New York; additional reporting by Matt Scuffham in New York and Jeff Mason and Susan Cornwell in Washington; Editing by Noeleen Walder, Grant McCool and James Dalgleish) -- © Copyright Reuters 2019-05-23 Follow Thaivisa on LINE for breaking Thailand news and visa info
  11. Have they not learned from previous experience? Banning and exiling rich folk from politics does not always go well.
  12. True is offering fixed return debentures over this 3 day period. Terms are posted on Kasikorn website under promotions. Fixed 4% is three year term and 5 year term gets 5%. Interest paid quarterly. Does anyone know anything about fee structures? Today is is the last day! Are there better places to park a few 100 thou here in TH? It’s not visa money. All comments entertained, or more likely entertaining! Thanks.
  13. You say they had ample opportunity to drastically improve peoples lives !!! Well they have done that, they have certainly improved their own and their cronies lives.
  14. Well said,Sunai Phasuk! But..I hope that you have an exit plan..
  15. Happiness to his people. In His mind the others don't matter.
  16. well said, thank meechai, whom at the time, many regarded as a good guy, and forget not the rail-roaded referendum on that little-understood constitution
  17. A refreshingly direct article from the Nation, particularly liked the opening sentence. They have had ample opportunity, to drastically improve people's lives, to have some sort of fairness here. It actually grieves me sometimes, when I see that some people - a lot more than in the West, have not had any opportunity to really improve their lives. Just continue to live by the day. Shall we discuss this sensibly, instead of the usual " Well, Thaksin was a crook"??? Ps. Just off to McD's for a Milkshake - anybody want one.....?
  18. And I think he really does believe he has brought "happiness" to the people ! Unbelievable !
  19. This once Great Nation is now nothing more than a worn out old boot...
  20. Brexit crisis: Minister quits, piling pressure on Britain's May By Elizabeth Piper, Kylie MacLellan and William James FILE PHOTO: Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves after giving a news briefing in Brussels, Belgium, March 22, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo LONDON (Reuters) - Prominent Brexit supporter Andrea Leadsom resigned from Prime Minister Theresa May's government on Wednesday, piling pressure on the British leader after a new Brexitgambit backfired and fuelled calls for her to quit. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1102260-brexit-crisis-commons-leader-quits-piling-pressure-on-britains-may/
  21. Brexit crisis: Minister quits, piling pressure on Britain's May By Elizabeth Piper, Kylie MacLellan and William James FILE PHOTO: Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves after giving a news briefing in Brussels, Belgium, March 22, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville/File Photo LONDON (Reuters) - Prominent Brexit supporter Andrea Leadsom resigned from Prime Minister Theresa May's government on Wednesday, piling pressure on the British leader after a new Brexitgambit backfired and fuelled calls for her to quit. So far May has resisted, vowing to press on despite opposition from lawmakers and other ministers to her bid to get her Brexit deal through parliament by softening her stance on a second referendum and customs arrangements. But Leadsom's resignation further deepens the Brexit crisis, sapping an already weak leader of her authority. Almost three years since Britain voted to leave the European Union, it is not clear when, how or even if Brexit will happen. Leadsom, Leader of the House of Commons, said she could not announce the new Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which will implement Britain's departure, in parliament on Thursday as she did not believe in it. "I no longer believe that our approach will deliver on the referendum result," Leadsom, once a challenger to May to become prime minister, said in a resignation letter. "It is therefore with great regret and with a heavy heart that I resign from the government." A Downing Street spokesman praised Leadsom and expressed disappointment at her decision, but added: "The prime minister remains focused on delivering the Brexit people voted for." May might still try to press on with her new Brexit plan, which includes a vote on whether to hold a second Brexit referendum -- once her legislation passes the first stage -- as well as closer trading arrangements with the EU. But it has been met with a swift backlash, with several lawmakers who have supported her in previous Brexit votes saying they could not back the new plan, particularly over her U-turn regarding a possible second referendum. "I have always maintained that a second referendum would be dangerously divisive, and I do not support the government willingly facilitating such a concession," Leadsom said. "No one has wanted you to succeed more than I have," Leadsom wrote to May. "But I do now urge you to make the right decisions in the interests of the country, this government and our party." Labour lawmaker Ian Lavery, chair of the opposition party, said the resignation underlined that "the prime minister's authority is shot and her time is up". "For the sake of the country, Theresa May needs to go, and we need an immediate general election," he said. TIME TO GO Labour's call echoed those of many of May's own Conservatives, who say that a fourth attempt to get her deal approved by parliament should be shelved and she should leave office to offer a new leader a chance to reset the dial. "There is one last chance to get it right and leave in an orderly fashion. But it is now time for Prime Minister Theresa May to go -- and without delay," said Conservative lawmaker Tom Tugendhat, chairman of parliament's Foreign Affairs Select Committee. "She must announce her resignation after Thursday's European (Parliament) elections," he wrote in the Financial Times. But while so much about Brexit is up in the air, what is clear is that May plans to stay for now, or at least for the next few days. The chairman of the powerful Conservative 1922 Committee, which can make or break prime ministers, told lawmakers that she planned to campaign in the European poll on Thursday before meeting with the group on Friday to discuss her leadership. May has so far fended off bids to oust her by promising to set out a departure timetable once parliament has had a chance to vote again on Brexit, but a new discussion on a possible date could now take place on Friday. Earlier on Wednesday, May stood firm during more than two hours of questions in parliament, urging lawmakers to back the bill and then have a chance to make changes to it, so they can have more control over the final shape of Brexit. Asked by eurosceptic lawmaker Jacob Rees-Mogg whether she really believed in the new deal she had proposed or whether she was simply going through the motions, May said: "I don't think I would have been standing here at the despatch box and be in receipt of some of the comments I have been in receipt of from colleagues on my own side and across the house if I didn't believe in what I was doing." Britain's marathon crisis over Brexit has stunned allies and foes alike. With the deadlock in London, the world's fifth-largest economy faces an array of options including an exit with a deal to smooth the transition, a no-deal exit, an election, a second referendum, or even revocation of the Article 50 notice to leave the EU. The pound was on track for its longest-ever losing streak against the euro as some traders said they saw the rising chance of a no-deal Brexit. Those fears pushed investors into the relative safety of government bonds -- particularly those that offer protection against a spike in inflation. "The proposed second reading of the WAB is clearly doomed to failure so there really is no point wasting any more time on the prime minister's forlorn hope of salvation," Andrew Bridgen, a Conservative lawmaker, told Reuters. "She's got to go." (Additional reporting by Alistair Smout, Writing by Guy Faulconbridge and Elizabeth Piper; Editing by Mark Heinrich and Catherine Evans) -- © Copyright Reuters 2019-05-23 Follow Thaivisa on LINE for breaking Thailand news and visa info
  22. And yet the inflated thai bhat remains defiant..
  23. IMHO the damage this man has done to thailands already failing image is nothing less than disgraceful..
  24. Birth??!!, more like a miscarriage....... of justice
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...