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BANGKOK 23 May 2019 06:04

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  2. Trump torpedoes meeting with Democrats, blasts Pelosi's 'cover-up' accusation By Steve Holland, Jeff Mason and Richard Cowan House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speak to the media along with other Democratic lawmakers including Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR), House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Chairman Rep. Peter DeFazio and Rep. James Clyburn (D-SC), who had traveled to the White House for a failed meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump to discuss infrastructure in Washington, U.S., May 22, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly cut short a White House meeting with Democratic lawmakers on infrastructure, then ripped into them over House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's accusation that he is engaged in a cover-up and asserted that he could not work with them unless they dropped multiple investigations. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1102263-trump-torpedoes-meeting-with-democrats-blasts-pelosis-cover-up-accusation/
  3. that professor may be intelligent and the kind of person this place needs in leadership but asking for fairness in today's thailand is asking to walk on water
  4. Trump torpedoes meeting with Democrats, blasts Pelosi's 'cover-up' accusation By Steve Holland, Jeff Mason and Richard Cowan House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speak to the media along with other Democratic lawmakers including Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR), House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Chairman Rep. Peter DeFazio and Rep. James Clyburn (D-SC), who had traveled to the White House for a failed meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump to discuss infrastructure in Washington, U.S., May 22, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump on Wednesday abruptly cut short a White House meeting with Democratic lawmakers on infrastructure, then ripped into them over House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's accusation that he is engaged in a cover-up and asserted that he could not work with them unless they dropped multiple investigations. "I don't do cover-ups," the Republican president, clearly agitated, told reporters at a previously unscheduled Rose Garden appearance after his brief meeting with Democratic congressional leaders that Pelosi described as "very, very, very strange." Unleashing a familiar litany of gripes about Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe and the follow-up congressional inquiries that he has been stonewalling, Trump also complained that Democrats had met to discuss whether to impeach him - or, as he called it, "the I-word." The rupture bodes ill for any possible cooperation between the president and the Democrats who control the House of Representatives on legislation on infrastructure or other matters as Trump seeks re-election in 2020, signalling deepening political gridlock in Washington. Pelosi, the top congressional Democrat, did not back down afterward and pointedly mentioned the possibility of impeachment, the U.S. Constitution's process for the House and Senate to remove a president from office. "The fact is, in plain sight in the public domain, this president is obstructing justice and he's engaged in a cover-up - and that could be an impeachable offence," Pelosi said in an event at the Center for American Progress, a liberal Washington policy advocacy group. The president is stonewalling congressional investigations by ignoring subpoenas, refusing to let current and former advisers testify and not handing over documents in the aftermath of the April release of Mueller's report that detailed Russian interference in the 2016 election to boost Trump's candidacy. After the blow-up of the meeting and Trump's diatribe, Democrats accused him of setting them up and expressed concern about his conduct and the long-term outlook. "The president has made it clear he doesn't want to consider any substantive issue as long as he's under investigation," Dick Durbin, the No. 2 Senate Democrat, told Reuters in the U.S. Capitol after the turbulent events at the White House. "I've got news for the president: Every president is under investigation. That's the nature of our Constitution," he said. In the run-up to the infrastructure meeting, Trump was stewing over Pelosi's cover-up remarks, according to a White House official. Pelosi, amid growing talk about impeachment, had told reporters about an hour before the scheduled meeting that Trump is engaged in a cover-up. As the meeting neared, Trump told aides he wanted to hold an event in the Rose Garden to make a statement. When Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer arrived in the Cabinet Room, Trump walked in, stood at the head of a long boardroom table, and told them he had asked them over to talk about infrastructure, but that the speaker had just accused him of a cover-up. The meeting lasted only three to five minutes, the official said. Once Trump exited, Pelosi told Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and others in the room that prior presidents like Theodore Roosevelt had brought people together on infrastructure but Trump had walked out, two sources familiar with the meeting said. Trump senior adviser Kellyanne Conway asked Pelosi, "Do you have a response to what the president actually said?" Pelosi fired back, "I'm going to engage directly with the president, not the staff." "That's very pro-woman of you," Conway fired back, the sources said. Afterward, Trump strode to a podium adorned with a professionally made sign that read, "No Collusion, No Obstruction" and that also listed the cost and length of the Mueller probe. Trump said, "I walked into the room and I told Senator Schumer, Speaker Pelosi, I want to do infrastructure. I want to do it more than you want to do it. I'd be really good at that - that's what I do. But you know what? You can't do it under these circumstances. So get these phony investigations over with." A source close to Trump said he has been troubled in recent days by see former aide Hope Hicks and other people close to him subpoenaed in the House probe. Just three weeks ago, Trump and the Democrats agreed to spend $2 trillion on roads, bridges and other infrastructure. Wednesday's meeting was supposed to be about ironing out the thorny details of how to pay for it all. 'I PRAY FOR THE PRESIDENT' "For some reason," Pelosi told reporters, "and maybe it was lack of confidence on his part - that he really couldn't match the greatness of the challenge that we have - he wasn't really respectful of the Congress and the White House working together." "In any event, I pray for the president of the United States and I pray for the United States of America," Pelosi added. Trump and the Democrats have become locked in a high-stakes power struggle over the ability of Congress to investigate him, with the president increasingly asserting that his advisers need not respond to lawmakers' requests. Numerous congressional probes now underway range from whether Trump tried to obstruct Mueller's inquiry to the president's undisclosed tax returns, his handling of numerous policy issues and possible conflicts of interest involving the businesses he has not divested even while serving. Most of his fellow Republicans dismiss the investigations as political assaults ahead of the 2020 election. Asked if there is a complete breakdown now in the legislative process or any relationship with Trump, Durbin said: "What would you think if the president invited us back tomorrow? You think he'd be there or would not walk in and perform another piece of stagecraft? I just don't know." Pelosi and other senior House leaders have been trying to tamp down demands from more junior Democratic lawmakers for impeachment proceedings, urging them to give court subpoena enforcement actions time to progress. Trump, three of his children and his company on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos ruled in New York that Congress has the legal authority to demand the records. In the first court test of Trump's stonewalling strategy, U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington on Monday blocked a lawsuit by Trump seeking to quash a subpoena by a House panel to his long-time accounting firm Mazars LLP seeking his financial records. Trump has appealed. On another front, the Democratic House Intelligence Committee chairman has agreed to hold off enforcing a subpoena against Attorney General William Barr after the Justice Department agreed to turn over Mueller probe-related materials. (Reporting by Steve Holland, Jeff Mason, Roberta Rampton, Susan Heavey, Richard Cowan, Mohammed Zargham and Doina Chiacu; Editing by Kevin Drawbaugh, Will Dunham and Lisa Shumaker) -- © Copyright Reuters 2019-05-23 Follow Thaivisa on LINE for breaking Thailand news and visa info
  5. I wish that someone would blow out all the blasted candles.. "Happy birthday to me.. Happy birthday to me.."
  6. Helping Trump become what he claims he is: ’The most transparent President ever’
  7. how can people stand by and listen/see/take this kind of bs, thanathorn is the strongest advocate for freedom of speech and democracy that this country has probably ever seen the dark forces of thai politics (those against thanathorn) truly are evil
  8. fools; one area is 'key' one day and not the next ? should apply across the board and not matter if someone is an 'expert'
  9. Some fanboys on here, had me believe the election was 100% legitimate, and in no way rigged ! This news does surprise me.
  10. Widen your scope and you won't need a telescope to find them for a lot less than 50000bht a month................. very true i have met many nice ladies on the internet and never paid a cent for any of them. sure they may be trying to play the long game, and of course i pay for everything should we go out or go on holidays.
  11. My biggest concern is Trump typing nonsense on Twitter and the other party(ies) deciding to launch first.
  12. Sunia Phasuk very good article, but be careful watch your back.
  13. Judge rules against Trump, paves way for banks to provide his business records to Congress By Brendan Pierson FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump reacts as he speaks at the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride event after the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1102262-judge-rules-against-trump-paves-way-for-banks-to-provide-his-business-records-to-congress/
  14. The whole idea of the referendum was an attempt to heal a schism in the Tory party. That worked well didn’t it?!
  15. why is it so difficult to believe and accept ? military governments are B A D
  16. Judge rules against Trump, paves way for banks to provide his business records to Congress By Brendan Pierson FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump reacts as he speaks at the Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride event after the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump, three of his children and the Trump Organization on Wednesday lost their bid to block Deutsche Bank AG and Capital One Financial Corp from providing financial records to Democratic lawmakers investigating Trump's businesses. In a decision read from the bench after hearing arguments, U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos in New York said Congress has the legal authority to demand the records, clearing the way for the banks to comply with subpoenas issued to them by two U.S. House of Representatives committees last month. The committees have agreed not to enforce the subpoenas for seven days, the judge said. It was the second time in three days that a judge had ruled against the Republican president in his fight with Democrats and Trump's lawyers were expected to appeal both decisions. Ramos said he would not suspend his decision pending appeal. Some Democratic lawmakers welcomed the decision. "So far, I think the president would be wise to come to the realization that our legitimate areas of inquiry are going to be supported by the courts," Representative Dan Kildee, a Michigan Democrat and member of the House Ways and Means Committee, told Reuters in an interview. Representative Brad Sherman, a Democratic member of the financial services committee, was more cautious, telling Reuters in an interview that he expected the decision would be appealed. Asked if lawmakers should be satisfied that they will get the information they seek, Sherman said, "I'll believe it when I see it out of the U.S. Supreme Court." The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Deutsche Bank said it would abide by the court's decision. Capital One did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Trump, who is seeking re-election next year, has aggressively sought to defy congressional oversight of his administration since Democrats took control of the House in January. Ramos said that the committees had the power to issue the subpoenas under Congress' "broad" power to conduct investigations to further legislation. He also rejected Trump's argument that they were barred by a federal financial privacy law, the Right to Financial Privacy Act, saying the law does not apply to congressional investigations. Trump said last month that the administration was "fighting all the subpoenas" issued by the House, hardening his position after the release of a redacted report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller on how Russia interfered in the 2016 U.S. election to help Trump and on the president's attempts to impede the investigation. "We remain committed to providing appropriate information to all authorized investigations and will abide by a court order regarding such investigations," Deutsche Bank spokeswoman Kerrie McHugh said in an emailed statement after the ruling. Lawyers for the Trump family members and the Trump Organization declined to comment on the decision. Some parts of the subpoenas have been included in court filings. The subpoena on Deutsche Bank seeks extensive records of accounts, transactions and investments linked to Trump, his three oldest children, their immediate family members and several Trump Organization entities, as well as records of ties they might have to foreign entities. Deutsche Bank has long been a principal lender for Trump's real estate business and a 2017 disclosure form showed that Trump had at least $130 million of liabilities to the bank. The subpoena on Capital One seeks records related to multiple entities tied to the Trump Organization's hotel business. In March, before issuing their subpoena, Democratic lawmakers asked Capital One for documents concerning potential conflicts of interest tied to Trump's Washington hotel and other business interests since he became president in January 2017. Trump, his adult children, Donald Jr., Eric and Ivanka, and the Trump Organization had sought a preliminary injunction to prevent Deutsche Bank complying with the subpoenas from the House Financial Services Committee and the House Intelligence Committee, and Capital One from complying with a subpoena from the Financial Services Committee. In a lawsuit filed on April 29, lawyers for the Trumps argued that the subpoenas were too broad, and that Democrats are hoping they will "stumble upon something" that could be used for political attacks on the president. Patrick Strawbridge, a lawyer for Trump, said at Wednesday's hearing that the subpoenas were "the epitome of an inquiry into private or personal matters," and that the House committees were reaching beyond their role as legislators. Douglas Letter, a lawyer for the committees, said the subpoenas were part of a "very serious investigation on behalf of the American people" that could lead to legislation aimed at reducing foreign influence in U.S. politics. He denied that it was intended to target Trump personally. "He clearly sees us as some sort of nuisance," Letter said. The banks are the only defendants in the case, but the House committees intervened to oppose Trump's effort to block the subpoenas. Representative Maxine Waters, who chairs the House Financial Services Committee, told reporters after the lawsuit was filed that Trump had "cast a gauntlet." "We will fight him," she said. On Monday, a federal judge in Washington ruled against the president in a similar case, finding that Trump's accounting firm, Mazars LLP, must comply with a congressional subpoena for Trump's financial records. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta found that Congress was "not engaged in a fishing expedition" for the President's financial records when it subpoenaed Mazars and said that documents obtained might assist Congress in passing laws and performing other core functions. Trump called Mehta's decision "crazy" and "totally the wrong decision by obviously an Obama-appointed judge," referring to Trump's Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama. Ramos, the judge in the New York case, was also appointed by Obama. (Reporting by Brendan Pierson in New York; additional reporting by Matt Scuffham in New York and Jeff Mason and Susan Cornwell in Washington; Editing by Noeleen Walder, Grant McCool and James Dalgleish) -- © Copyright Reuters 2019-05-23 Follow Thaivisa on LINE for breaking Thailand news and visa info
  17. Have they not learned from previous experience? Banning and exiling rich folk from politics does not always go well.
  18. True is offering fixed return debentures over this 3 day period. Terms are posted on Kasikorn website under promotions. Fixed 4% is three year term and 5 year term gets 5%. Interest paid quarterly. Does anyone know anything about fee structures? Today is is the last day! Are there better places to park a few 100 thou here in TH? It’s not visa money. All comments entertained, or more likely entertaining! Thanks.
  19. You say they had ample opportunity to drastically improve peoples lives !!! Well they have done that, they have certainly improved their own and their cronies lives.
  20. Well said,Sunai Phasuk! But..I hope that you have an exit plan..
  21. Happiness to his people. In His mind the others don't matter.
  22. well said, thank meechai, whom at the time, many regarded as a good guy, and forget not the rail-roaded referendum on that little-understood constitution
  23. A refreshingly direct article from the Nation, particularly liked the opening sentence. They have had ample opportunity, to drastically improve people's lives, to have some sort of fairness here. It actually grieves me sometimes, when I see that some people - a lot more than in the West, have not had any opportunity to really improve their lives. Just continue to live by the day. Shall we discuss this sensibly, instead of the usual " Well, Thaksin was a crook"??? Ps. Just off to McD's for a Milkshake - anybody want one.....?
  24. And I think he really does believe he has brought "happiness" to the people ! Unbelievable !
  25. This once Great Nation is now nothing more than a worn out old boot...
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