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khunPer

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About khunPer

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    Titanium Member
  • Birthday 09/07/1949

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    Koh Samui

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  • Location
    Koh Samui

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  1. As some has already posted: Money... You cab be investor/shareholder in both private companies and stock exchange listed-companies by simply buying shares. However, there are some restrictions – or rather limits – as a foreigner, except US-nationals, cannot own more than 49 percent of a Thai company, or business. So being investor in a private Thai company limited, the total number of foreign investors, or shareholders, cannot exceed 49 percent of the registered shareholder capital. Any dividends paid will be withheld taxed with 10 percent, you don't need to
  2. That is actually strictly said true that you need to be on the correct side of the counter, even if you have a work permit, as it could be depending of exactly what your work permit states. A friend of mine, who had work permit as graphic designer, opened a smaller restaurant on Samui with both pool table and bar as extra service/income. Company limited and all necessary paperwork was perfectly Okay – permission for alcohol sale, playing music, etc. – including a hired Thai chef in the kitchen, and girlfriend taking care of orders and the business, and Thai staff for serving and d
  3. Thanks for your reply and link. Sad new for Brits living on small pensions, already loosing value due to currency exchange rate – and some posters have also talked about no indexed raise in payouts – but always look at the bright side of life: You'll have full income deductions and a low tax-rate in Thailand, and furthermore only be taxed of the amount you transfer in same calendar year as earned.
  4. You can be shareholder in a Thai company limited and own up to 49 percent of the shares – 51 percent need to be owned by Thai nationals, if you are not US-American – but a company can be set up with preferred shares, talk to a business lawyer about best ways to do that in your situation. With a registered shareholder capital of 2 million baht and 4 Thai employees, the company can have one work permit for a foreigner. If it's a company under BOI-rules, you might need fewer Thai employees...
  5. So you didn't care to read the full post, but quoted one sentence only? Here is what it's about... Opening a restaurant, that's also a weak point in the case. A foreigner cannot legally start a small restaurant in Thailand. A foreigner needs a Work Permit, cannot do certain work that is reserved for Thais, and a company limited set-up with a capital of two million baht and 51% of shares owned by Thais, and also four Thai employees is also needed; except if married to a Thai, then it could be a partnership with two employees and one million bat in capital. The article states
  6. How wrong, please explain – to my knowledge a foreigner need a partnership limited or a company limited.
  7. Thanks, seems like something is missing in the image's URL address, it worked, when I posted it. I'll try again...
  8. If have seen a few postings on the Internet about double taxation of British retirement pensions, but I cannot see that it's the case, since there is a DTA, which means that if tax has been paid in GB – for example of a retirement pension – and Thailand also tax that income, i.e. double taxation, Thailand shall deduct the tax already paid in Britain, from the tax due in Thailand. That should be covered by clause 23 "Elimination of double taxation".
  9. You might be thinking of some news articles with proposals about Elite Card and work permit; so far nothing has been agreed to my knmowledge... As others have already mentioned, anyone can invest in a Thai company – i.e. buying shares and being a shareholder in a Thai company limited – and you can also be member of the borard of directors and attend high-level meetings, but you cannot perform any lower duties, including being a managing director, without a work permit.
  10. If OP is US-American then he 100 percent can own a business in Thailand under the amity treaty...
  11. A bridge don't solve the Covid-19 crisis, i.e. mentioning Alternative State Quarantine together with a billion dollars, and years ahead construction project, as solution to the present World Wide reduction in tourism, it simply don't make common sense. Chinese tourists, which are considered as the saver of the crisis, would most certainly wish to fly in directly to the island by both international scheduled flights, and charter flights; just like they have been used to do before the coronavirus lockdown. I cannot imagine Chinese tourists – which according to statistics stays short
  12. The tax-man in Thailand don't seem to care much about foreigners. I know from experience how difficult it is to be registered for tax as a foreigner without a work permit, living from a combination af pension, savings, dividends and capital gains. For the latter – capital gains – i would think that most foreigners keep them offshore, just like me, and transfer them next calendar year or later... There are about 11 million people registered for income tax in Thailand, and around 4 million pays income tax. Source: The Nation Thailand "Wealthy could lose some tax-d
  13. Not a 21 years old teacher on Samui, where the international school fees are very modest, compared to Bangkok's hi-end institutions – I know the fees – about 40k a month is more in the level for a young skilled teacher; I'm however not sure if you can qualify for being a "skilled teacher" in an international school at age 21.
  14. Opening a restaurant, that's also a weak point in the case. A foreigner cannot legally start a small restaurant in Thailand. A foreigner needs a Work Permit, cannot do certain work that is reserved for Thais, and a company limited set-up with a capital of two million baht and 51% of shares owned by Thais, and also four Thai employees is also needed; except if married to a Thai, then it could be a partnership with two employees and one million bat in capital. The article states that she's from South Africa, so the US-Thai amity agreement for business is not in force here. However, t
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