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roiet

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Posts posted by roiet

  1. Why rent a machine?  you could search on the net and buy one it would probably work out far more profitable.

    You know, I was thinking along the same lines, but trying several different Google Searches I'm really not coming up with much. And in Thailand coming up with even less than "much".

    Of course one could put together a system with a CD player/speaker system, a Television and/or perhaps a PC. In fact as I type this, I would guess that a PC with a fair size Screen or the PC attached to a Television (as some sort of Video in/out) might work out just as well. I don't know, just a thought I'll pass on to the friend.

    And still having trouble believing the 3% thing, but so far, other than the Nong Khai reponse (thank you), no additional info on these Karaoki Machines to back it up yet.

    It could be that about THB 3000 per month goes legally to Legasit for playing CDs commercially.

    In our province 4 Karaoki bars installed this CD player/speaker/TV system. Very succesful business until Legasit (legal sitcom) came along one night cashing 4xTHB 50,000 on the spot for playing CDs commercially. Luckily these 4 Karaoki owners found some rich Chinese to pay the fines on the spot, otherwise the fines in a later court case could have gone up to THB 100,000 :D . All the Karaoki places closed now because the p.. also co... some m.. for .. purposes.

    PS: Playing CDs in a Karaoki bar requires now a permit besides the permit for running the bar, but nobody knew about this.

    So, if you buy some CDs for your friends Karaoki, Legasit could come along and make you responsible and cash some nice money :o . The amount is variable starting from THB 10k up to 100k depending on your negotiation power :D .

  2. I just put in a well, so now I have both city and my own water sources to choose from. And I also now have two blue monster filters -- one specifically for the well water, which then goes thru the second one that historically has dealt with the city water.

    But in talking with the well guy, I find I may not have known how to backflush these guys correctly. As I've got a lot of water pressure, do I:

    Slowly open the valve that vents the backflushed water, eventually arriving at max opening? Or do I lay off max pressure, period?

    Then, switching valve action to push filtered water thru the flush pipe, what's the correct procedure here? (This action must be required, I assume, because the water is pretty dirty immediately after switching from the backflush position, so I certainly wouldn't want the house valve opened until the filtered water runs clean.)

    And what about cycling back and forth between backflush and filtered position several times? Good idea when filter elements recently put in? Never? All the time?

    I've a filter in the house for final filtering of water I'll drink. Is there something about well water I should know? It looks and tastes fine -- but I'm non-skeptical about most things -- to a fault.

    (Skin still looks ok too after a well water shower -- will it eventually fall off?  :D)

    For backwash you need full power to remove the dirt stuck in the sand.

    After backwash there is always some dirt left beause the water was running in a reverse cycle trough the filter. Normally filters like this have also a rinse position enabling to remove remaining dirt from backwash. If you do not have this I suggest you cycle back and forth between backwash and filter position for 3 times.

    Drinking well water is always a small risk even if it tastes good. Your filters are maybe only filled with silica sand (sea sand) which only removes sediments but not bacteria. In your house you have maybe a small carbon filter which just filters some bacterias, but you have to clean that small filter so much ??

    Usually Manganese filters kill almost every bacteria.

    I use a cement tank for the well water to settle, then I throw very little diluted Chlorine (chlorine water) in this tank. The sediments and excessive iron etc etc settle on the floor. My stainless steel filter has 33 % manganese on top, 33 % carbon in the middle and 33% Silica sand at the bottom.

    Result: Cristal clear water for my commercial swimming pool and bungalows :o .

    Tests showed no bacteria left but I would not drink it.

    To produce drinking water you would have to add a UV-Ozone filter which is the standard here. I use one of these for my swimming pool because its 3000 times more efficient than chlorine.

    PS: Have a look at these websites.

    ext.nodak.edu/extpubs

    lentech.com

    aquatechnology.net

    spadepot.com

  3. Yesterday my GF and I went in to Korat to get the medical certificates we need to get our Thai driver's licenses. But first, I had an important luncheon engagement with Ken at the Pasinee restaurant.

    When GF and I hooked up a bit later she announced, "Guess what, I already got my health certificate."

    Great, I think to myself, now I have to go and get mine on my own....

    But, she quickly adds, "I got yours, too!"

    Apparently, the clinic to which she went is attended by a physician so advanced in his medical ability that he was able to find that I was in good health by simply having his assistant examine my passport!

    Although my GF was physically present in the clinic, no actual exam was required of her either! The assistant simply looked at her Thai ID card and completed the certificate.

    I'm sure you're as excited as I am to learn that medicine this advanced has reached the vast Northeast.

    Amazing Thailand!

    Nothing new at all. The doctors will even give her a false bill stating you are sick. You can use it to claim money. They will do it for her because she will say you are sick.

    etc etc

    Other countries, other customs.

  4. I always remember 2 irish guys came into the Bamboo Bar at buriram, started complaining, making pratts of themselves, then they both ordered fish n chips, when the meal  came, the one guy started moaning to wella, this aint cod, you get some idiots in Thailand.

    The other side of Bamboo Bar is not wanting to serve the customer. Went there one evening and ordered food which is on the menue card. After 30 minutes asked when the food will arrive. Assurance from the manager and the service in another 10 minutes. After 1 hour it was promised soon.

    Same experience for another 6 customers sitting next to us, but nobody of the 12 customers ordered the same menue. No shortage of staff, the staff was all hanging around the bar drinking beer with customers :D . We all left hungry and learnt later that Bamboo Bar does not care about serving menues, just put the menue on the card for some Buriram attractions :o .

  5. A guest house in Isaan is certainly feasible but making money with a guesthouse in Isaan is another question entirely.  Does anyone here have any stories about how much money some farang has made running a guest house in Isaan?  Does anyone here have any stories about some farang that went broke with a guesthouse in Isaan?

    And since you describe yourself as a 'lowly carpenter' I will assume that you have no great desire or ability to run a business.  If I am correct in this assumption then there probably isn't any way that you can make money in Isaan.

    There are many many 6-10 room bungalows around here making very good money. Run by wifes of falang husbands with falangs controlling the business in the background. They never engage themself directly in the business. Visitors are mainly middle class Thais from far locations not wanting to stay with in laws over night. Others are Thai sales men or engineers traveling. This visitors do not mind to spend THB 400 for a decent shower and aircon.

    Occupancy around 90 %. Return of investment 5-7 years.

    All real facts, no storries. But keep in mind strict control and cleaning required otherwise customers talk and never come back.

    PS: I have seen many dirty bungalows getting out of business soon.

    90% occupancy on a year round basis is phenomenal!!!!! Can you give us the names of a few of these bungalow establishments? I'm kind of wondering if they have exagerated their occupancy rates though.....90% in a rural area????

    Roi-et and the sorounding small cities are not so rural anymore. Look at Selapum, Bontong etc etc As mentioned there is a new tendency of middle class Thai travelleres wanting to use good accomodation. But more than 40 % of all bungalow and guesthouses here are out of business because they can not cater for customers needs as mentioned above.

    PS: Promotion for these bungalows, guesthouses is not permitted in this forum.

  6. A guest house in Isaan is certainly feasible but making money with a guesthouse in Isaan is another question entirely.  Does anyone here have any stories about how much money some farang has made running a guest house in Isaan?  Does anyone here have any stories about some farang that went broke with a guesthouse in Isaan?

    And since you describe yourself as a 'lowly carpenter' I will assume that you have no great desire or ability to run a business.  If I am correct in this assumption then there probably isn't any way that you can make money in Isaan.

    There are many many 6-10 room bungalows around here making very good money. Run by wifes of falang husbands with falangs controlling the business in the background. They never engage themself directly in the business. Visitors are mainly middle class Thais from far locations not wanting to stay with in laws over night. Others are Thai sales men or engineers traveling. This visitors do not mind to spend THB 400 for a decent shower and aircon.

    Occupancy around 90 %. Return of investment 5-7 years.

    All real facts, no storries. But keep in mind strict control and cleaning required otherwise customers talk and never come back.

    PS: I have seen many dirty bungalows getting out of business soon.

  7. Marrage money does not come out of the dowery .

    That you will have to pay also .

    Actually you will have to pay for everything ... always . Get used to it .

    Marriage money can come out of the dowry, sometimes they give all or part of it back. There are no hard and fast rules, so many differrent practices between areas which is why I asked about the gift money, I never heard of this going to the parents before. In my case they are giving half of the dowry back to me as a compromise, as it is it's twice what it should be IMO. GF is paying for her dresses, my ring and party so it could be worse. I don't agree with the don't pay isin sott it's all a scam argument or pay whatever they want it's a lot cheaper than at home-peter

    There are always rules about dowry, gift money etc etc. Its everything about loosing face. Your dowry is high and must be presented on the carpet before the public, so no loosing face. You have arranged the pay back of 50 % with your mother in law beforehand, fine. Nobody except your mother in law and future wife knows about it because your mother in law puts the dowry in her bank. Why are you trying to get some more money back like small gift money which goes in any case again to your mother in law. Your girl friend is already paying for her dress, your ring and party. I attented more than 30 thai/falang weddings already and never heard of girl friend paying for her wedding dress ????????

  8. Can anyone tell me what error 999 is. I can't get into my e-mail when asked for password.

                Thanks

    Same experience. Some E mail providers introduced secure conections. Just below the password confirmation you can find the question standard connection or secure connection. Click secure before you log in.

    Problem solved.

  9. We are visitors to this country and can change some shortcomings over a long period if we do it tactfully.

    A constructive dialogue has been initiated by the governor of Ro-et  years ago. He invited a group of foreigners to these OTOP meetings. Foreigners where asked to express their opinions about local Thai products suitable for export. He also mentioned that we are always welcome to express our request for special matters. We could and can still express our opinions and suggestions in a very constructive way.

    Other examples include highly ranked government officials pay courtesy visits to foreigners to engage themselfs in the needs of the foreign community here. The dialogue exists.

    If a dialogue exists, it is but a very faint whisper. That's wonderful what the Governor of Roi-Et is doing, but there are certainly more pressing issues than what OTOP products will sell abundantly overseas, which sounds more like unpaid consultant work, than a true discussion of issues affecting the foreign community. The second portion of his dialogue is certainly more impressive and I'd be most curious as to what type of requests he's receieved and the actions he took. If the Governor was to publish in some type of format these interactions, it would truly go a long way to improve the "dialogue" and communication.

    As for the foreign community at large, these could certainly be improved on a wide variety of issues with the responsible ministries/departments by increased communication. Ad hoc committees of foreigners, which could work with Immigration, Labor (Labour), Education, among others, to improve conditions for the literally thousands of people involved and thusly improve Thailand as well.

    This, however, requires forethought and concern and a willingness to truly discuss issues... unfortunately, the current government possesses none of these traits.

    Possesses none of these traits, dialogue is a faint whisper.

    These and other expressions are often used here, so why should some foreigner write about some positive experience. Further positive publications would be dismantled.

    PS: I do not answer any further replies.

  10. As visitors in this country it is important to remember just who we are. We might not like the politics, or the prime minister or the visa office or the local tuk -tuk driver - but that's our own personal problem, not the problem of Thailand, our host country (assuming you are settled here and trying to make a future - as many of us are). We have to fit in with what are currently the rules, regulations, or processes. We may not like it and we might protest loudly and continually, but we should do it politely, thoughtfully and tactfully.

    To win any respect for what we / you consider is "our cause" will take time and effort and appropriate effort in the right areas, whether this is to the prime-minister, the local politician etc. An appropriate approach is not pointing out what you might consider to be their short comings but constructive dialogue as to why we can be a benefit to Thailand and how (some or us) are working and supporting families, paying taxes and adding value to the country.

    From my own personal view point, if you are not adding anything constructive to Thailand – stay out of the discussion as you are only a hindrance to those who are trying to develop a future here, furthermore, if you don’t like or can’t accept Thailand for what it is and it’s a problem for you – go back home and the sooner the better.

    We are visitors to this country and can change some shortcomings over a long period if we do it tactfully.

    A constructive dialogue has been initiated by the governor of Ro-et years ago. He invited a group of foreigners to these OTOP meetings. Foreigners where asked to express their opinions about local Thai products suitable for export. He also mentioned that we are always welcome to express our request for special matters. We could and can still express our opinions and suggestions in a very constructive way.

    Other examples include highly ranked government officials pay courtesy visits to foreigners to engage themselfs in the needs of the foreign community here. The dialogue exists.

  11. i counted forteen falangs in tesco-lotus when i was last in roi-et, just in one visit, the city is realy beautiful, the lake has millions of huge fish that people go to feed every day, also you see people jogging around the lake, the white elephant has great falang food and the owner (swiss, i think )is very pleasant guy. i stayed at the city hotel and the other one , with a pool, both quite ok, awful american breakfasts, but i forgive them that !! i built a small two bed house for my mother-in-law on a small plot for 500,000 bht. a decent 3 bed place would cost 1-1.5 million. lots of beer places, discos, bars, but the clientel is very thai and not too many people speak english, unless they,ve worked in bangkok. all in all a very nice place to be, i,m thinking of moving up there full time in the near future.

    That sounds very nice :o

    I would like to go there sometime . I have heard that there are mountians and it actually get cool outside at times .

    How long of a ride is it from Korat ?

    But 14 farangs at one time .... way to many !

    Take care ,

    Jeff

    It gets cool outside sometimes from the trees planted around the city. The beer places around 101 life music restaurant are open and also cool. No mountains to find. It is 2 hours from Korat. 300 foreigners live permanently in the province Roi-et. They all do their shopping in Lotus, Macro, Plaza but their houses are scattered 100km around this province. In night time you will see only a few foreigners in White Elephant and 101 (roi-et) restaurant.

    Take a ride to the smiling :D:D city of Isaan.

  12. I heard that 50 years ago the first Thai teacher married a Swiss man. Later she introduced her sister to other Swiss men and in 50 years 100 foreigners married Thai ladies from this place. All introduced by family and relatives and friends over a period of 50 years. I believe the statistics are bit out of proportion, this story is already very very  old and written over and over and 96 instead of 66 swiss man are the professors result etc   Aged 20 - 59 is another bracketing error.  Some of these Thai ladies went to Switzerland 50 years ago. Statistically seen the wealth in Baan Jarn is accumulated over 50 years.  Again BBC and the professor made a big story. It seems that the income of the grandchildren staying in Switzerland now beeing 20 -30 of age is added to the money flow. I heard that only 2 Swiss live in Baan Jarn, all the others live happily with their Thai wifes and Swiss born children in Switzerland.

    Summary: This research and the BBC report is a copy of a very old story and really to much asumptions and extrapolation applied. Some general remarks about Thai ladies marry foreigners added to make the story a bit spicy.

    Now that I can believe,

    but it cannot be extrapolated to cover the rest of Thailand,

    as any good university graduate or profesor should know.

    The data quoted by the professor is a statistical anomoly.

    My own, limited, experience says that only a very few Thai's are happily married

    to farangs.

    They are scattered around the country and the world.

    They are married to a wide variety of nationalities.

    Correct, a statistical anomoly.

    Some rather more representative statistics provided by the governor of Roi-et.

    Changwat Roi-et has 600,000 inhabitants. 1200 foreigners married to Thai woman. The majority are English followed by German, Swiss, Norwegian, French, Italian, American etc. A total of 32 nationalities married to Thai woman. Only 300 foreigners live in this Changwat. All the others are scattered around the world with their 900 Thai wifes.

    The place where I live outside Roi-et has 8000 inhabitants, 107 Thai woman married to foreigners from 18 nationalities. Only 3 foreigners live in this place.

  13. Since living in Thailand (about 18 months) I have yet to meet one single Thai girl/woman who wants to marry a Thai man.

    My wife and I personally know of at least 2 dozen girls/women who want European husbands.

    The reason's for this are all too obvious if you know anything of Thailand and Thai men who are generally piss poor fathers, piss heads, gamblers, womanisers, wife beaters, chauvinists, unreliable, untrustworthy.............shall I go on.

    This, by the way, is not my opinion its the opinion of my Thai wife (although knowing her father I agree with it 100%).

    My wife badgers me constantly to find a husband for 4 members of her own family - her sister, and 3 of her nieces - 2 of whom are "pure" as my wife puts it and are available for marriage if you have the necessary 500,000 baht.

    (absolute discretion assured)

    I wish I could find ANYONE I know who is in a position to take any of these women as a wife but I cant.

    For this survey to claim 110 women out of a population of 330 are married to or have non-Thai  partners either living in Thailand or out of Thailand is a statistical IMPOSSIBLITY as anyone with the capacity of logical thought would realize.

    As I stated earlier, it is much better to question the professor's study based on more knowledge of her methodology and actual research questions. Your claim that her numbers are statistically impossible is not correct, based on the reasons I stated in post #81.

    Both you and Roiet dismiss this study based on your own vague references and assumptions (not to mention your own biases). I am not arguing that her research or numbers are perfect - I cannot be that certain. But her hypothesis sounds probable, and on the basis of this argument, is not a statistical impossibility.

    Slim, all of your arguments seem to hinge on what you see or do personally. Just because you don't see many foreign men in the villages or when you shop, does not mean that there are no foreign marriages present. This is a huge assumption which leave gaping flaws in your own assessment. There are plenty of foreign men who do not shop, do not live in the village, or do not live with their wives most of the time.

    C'mon, this is a no-brainer, right? You are completely subjective in your own reasoning as to why this report should be dismissed. But hey, I'm glad your own marriage and work with your Thai family has made you a leading expert on the issue of poverty, culture, and gender dynamics in Thailand. I'm sure you have thought much more about it than me, and the hundreds of researchers who have studied it from both the domestic and transnational perspective, :o

    Kat

    Vague assumptions. No facts.

    Have you been to this village Baan Jarn which is in Changwat Roi-et. Did you interview the village chief ? :D

    The village chief said 66 woman from this village married Swiss man. He also said that 100 woman from this village married foreigners and only 2 Swiss man live in this village.

    I know this from first hand and I have more statistics on hand provided by the governor of Roi-et.

    So, 100 Baan Jarn woman married foreigners, 2 Swiss man live in this village.

    100 minus 2 equals 98 % woman married Swiss. Statistical error of ? ??? Deviation of how many % :D

    As said this story is published every few years and every time its published its twisted a bit more. The professor did not do survey in this vilage, the figures picked from some news publications, but which one

    PS: You want to pay a visit with me to the village chief ??

  14. The report findings show nearly 1 in 3 of 330 women aged 20-59, WHO RESIDE IN THE VILLAGE, are married to foreigners, of which 96% are Swiss men.
    Lek is not alone in her choice of partner. Of the 540 households in Baan Jarn, at least 100 can boast a foreign son-in-law, almost invariably living in Switzerland.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/3907581.stm

    According to the original BBC article these people reside in Switzerland. not in the village.

    You're as confused as the "professor", Kat, if you think that if you go to Baan Jarn you're going to meet 100 Swiss men.

    I heard that 50 years ago the first Thai teacher married a Swiss man. Later she introduced her sister to other Swiss men and in 50 years 100 foreigners married Thai ladies from this place. All introduced by family and relatives and friends over a period of 50 years. I believe the statistics are bit out of proportion, this story is already very very old and written over and over and 96 instead of 66 swiss man are the professors result etc Aged 20 - 59 is another bracketing error. Some of these Thai ladies went to Switzerland 50 years ago. Statistically seen the wealth in Baan Jarn is accumulated over 50 years. Again BBC and the professor made a big story. It seems that the income of the grandchildren staying in Switzerland now beeing 20 -30 of age is added to the money flow. I heard that only 2 Swiss live in Baan Jarn, all the others live happily with their Thai wifes and Swiss born children in Switzerland.

    Summary: This research and the BBC report is a copy of a very old story and really to much asumptions and extrapolation applied. Some general remarks about Thai ladies marry foreigners added to make the story a bit spicy.

  15. I work in the telecom industry and can inform you all that it is very easy for a service provider (e.g. AIS) to block all calls to its customers from competitors (e.g. Orange, DTAC).

    I sat in the car with my gf the other week and tried 8 times to call her unsuccessfully. When she tried to call me straight after she got through first time. Guess what, she is AIS and I am DTAC!

    Any further comment would be superfluous.

    Technically no problem to block number ranges of calls but I doubt AIS will block other service providers calls. In Thailand all the providers signed Interconnection agreements. AIS collects nice money :o for routing DTAC calls to AIS subscribers and vice versa. Besides that analyzers are installed on both sides of the gateways monitoring all the calls. Its just a planning and design matter. Some more DPN switches to set up, trunk capacity to increase, some redundancy to build for your 8 unsuccessful calls.

  16. I have a Fuji Fine Pix 402, with a 128 memory card which I purchased last year. When turning on the camera today, I got an error message "Card not intialized!". When I put another card in the camera, there is no problem. Now what has happened here, is the card f####d, can I do anything about it? Thanks in advance!

    Check the thiny read/write protect switch on the side of the card

  17. As far as I know (I have also a 30+30 lease) the only 'sure' thing is :

    1. As a non-Thai, you can never own or inherit land in Thailand.

    I believe that you actually can inherit land as a non-Thai. However you won't be able to keep the land, which will subsequently have to be sold. I have no idea about the process, but I would guess the land would be sold by the administrators of the estate before the estate is divided among the heirs.

    Sophon

    A Non Thais wife died and he had to sell her 30 rai land within 1 year (This according Thai law). He found no buyer and wanted to split the land for easier selling. This was not permitted and he had to handover the land to his 10 year old daughter (the only heir). If there is no heir the land will be transfered to the next inherritors in the family chain.

    True story.

    So 30 years leasing would be the only safeguard.

  18. I have been living in Bangkok and central Thailand for the last two years and have never ventured into Esan and think its time to check it out.

    I have a few questions and if anyone could answer all/any of them I would be forever in their debt.

    * I was planning to visit Roi-et and Si Sa Ket as I have heard they are the most friendly in Thailand, is this true?

    *Where else is worth a visit?

    *I will be travelling alone and can speak a fair bit of Thai but can't speak a word of the Esan dialect. Will this be a problem?

    *Any nightlife in Esan?

    *anything else I need to think about?

    Thanks in advance!!!!

    Come to Surin.....................................we'll have 28 isaan psycho's then.

    Tourist info :o ???

  19. Certainly much windier than i've ever known it here.

    Seen a few mini kind of tornadoes maybe fifty foot high this year,pulled quiet a crowd as it sucked up dust and paper.

    In Roi-et and east of Roi-et I have seen all kinds of very strong winds and low and high pressure clashes in the last years. But now these 10 meter high mini tornados happen every week once. Motorcycles blown around. Makes everybody scared.

  20. The problem of calling to Ais from Dtac hasn't gone away yet, but it's off the news focus already. Even Bangkok Post's Database hasn't mentioned it in their weekly "home review".

    Having to dial again and again and watch your phone it case it finally connects is annoying to say the least.

    Right, its off the news focus, but the DTAC customers phoning to AIS are still suffering . No connection, busy. Friends of mine changed from the always reliable DTAC to the the promotion loaded :D AIS. They all regret it, besides this I can not contact them for hours :o .

  21. Storm fells nearly 100 electricity pylons in Kalasin

    KALASIN: -- Electricity officials in Thailand's north-eastern province of Kalasin were today desperately trying to repair the damage after a fierce storm last night fell nearly 100 pylons carrying high-voltage electrical wires.

    As officials from the provincial disaster prevention and mitigation office rushed to the rescue of local residents, staff at the Kalasin branch of the Provincial Electricity Authority (PEA) mobilized forces to repair the pylons along the Kalasin-Roi Et Road.

    Several second-hand cars were also damaged in the storm when the tent in which they were being stored fell on top of them, shattering their windscreens, while a large number of advertising billboards were also brought down.

    --TRNA 2005-04-26

    Fierce Summer Storms are something new in this region according to old local people. 2 weeks ago a storm (rather a localised hurricane) destroyed 30 Thai houses. Of course these houses are not strong built type. But roofs blown off and 4 cars blown off the road. Never seen before

  22. I live outside Roi-et but go there whenever I can. The taxis here are called Tuk- Tuk and are a bit small dimensioned :o . The owner of White Elephant has all the connections and might find a car to hire :D

    The food found in good restaurants here tends to be Thai and not Isaan style. Holiday makers will not get lost.

    Thanks for that Roiet. I know what a tuk-tuk is and how big. I quite enjoyed blasting around in the things when I was in Bangkok. They were sort of `ruff as guts' in an exciting sort of way. Loved the stink and the noise, awesome.

    Do you know how I can get hold of the owner of the white elephant and please tell me where it is in Roi-Et. Also you spoke of the resort Sawalak in Phanomprai, where is Phanomprai? It is not on my map. Is it very close to Roi-Et center?

    As far as places to stay go, do you think it is better to book them through a travel agent ( in Thailand or at home before We leave ) or to deal with the hotel directly? It is just that I had an experience in Bangkok where I had booked a package deal with 4 nights included. I decided to stay 1 more night and they asked me if I wanted to go through my travell agent. I thought it would be cheaper to deal directly with the hotel but to my dismay when I came to leave they charged me double what I was paying through the agent and also charged me for 2 nights not 1. I got shafted but didn`t figure it out till much later. Go Thailand.

    Travel agents do not know about these places. Package deals do not exist for these places. The real beauty of Isaan is rather hidden. If you really want to experience the real Isaan take your time and the help of your wife. You could start from Roi-et city Hotel and then walk 50 meters to White Elephant, Tuk Tuk another 300 meters to the swimming pool, lake or KFC etc Enjoy your flexible travel planning

  23. Its good to see that some business men know the value of service. Most know the cost of everything and the value of nothing.  Talking of Roi Et ....."White Elephant with snooker, dart and free high speed Internet.. " It's a shame that some other 'expat' venues in the Issan do not offer the same.

    :o

    There are other expat venues around Roi-et knowing the value of service. Ponton Zoo free entry. Resort Sawalak in Phanomprai has free swimming in big pool for Bungalow visitors. Happy Resort in Selapum 4 days pay, Number 5 free.

    etc etc

    Its not only expats providing good service. In Roi-et you get that little extra from lots of business people.

  24. [/quoteThe locals call Roi-et the smiling city :D . Nice for holiday making and settle down if you want. Very nice lake and park in the centre of town. Recommended hotels are Roi et City and Petcharad Garden (swimming pool). 2 more swimming pools in the city. Golf place. Shopping Lotus and Makro with lots of falang food. KFC and Plaza Shopping for Falang size dresses. Best falang food at White Elephant with snooker, dart and free high speed Internet.. Some very good styled Thai restaurants with very friendly :D service. Elegant live music restaurants like 101 and the Glass House. Good styled bars. Airport etc etc

    Thanks for the info.

    I guess that you live around Roi-et. If we stay at Roi-et do you think that it would be any problem to hire a taxi for a couple of days so that we can visit the inlaws?

    Tell me, is the tom yum good there? I can`t stop eating the stuff and since the wife has been away I have had to pay for it at great expense.

    I live outside Roi-et but go there whenever I can. The taxis here are called Tuk- Tuk and are a bit small dimensioned :o . The owner of White Elephant has all the connections and might find a car to hire :D

    The food found in good restaurants here tends to be Thai and not Isaan style. Holiday makers will not get lost.

  25. This has been advertised for years in the back pages of local expat publications but lately seems to have received an influx of advertising money so maybe it will emurge from the nitch market.  I have not seen any real compairson with brick wall construction that is normal here (most people do not use hollow cement blocks for homes) so would be careful to investigate fully.  Have also seen no mention of surface finishing.

    I can't help but have the feeling if I punch it will it crumble like a rice cracker?  :o

    I have seen these Q-con styled houses in Southern Spain. They provide excellent heat insulation in dry and very hot climate. I do not know how Q-con reacts to high humidity. Usually no surface finish applied. The walls are designed 3x 3 meters to provide stability.

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