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Gecko123

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  1. I've gone back and re-read the OP no less than 10 times trying to see if I was missing anything. The only way I can find any humor is if the OP is treating it as a foregone conclusion that renting to blacks is ill-advised, and that he is only telling his wife that he will seek opinions from TVF because he knows in advance (wink, wink) what he is going to hear from forum members. The humor derives from the "inside joke" that we, too, all know in advance what the answer is going to be, right? If there's some other interpretation that's gone over my head, please feel free to enlighten me.
  2. Very, very disappointed in you Pravda. Raising this question implies racial discrimination may sometimes be warranted. You might want to reflect on the possibility that someday in the not so distant future people may start asking themselves the same question about white people. Think about it. Many white people don't seem to like anybody who doesn't look like them, be they be Chinese, Black, Hispanic, Indian, Arab, African, etc., etc. Who wants to be around people like that? Trust me, many people are starting to ask themselves questions like this. Perhaps be
  3. I've done quite a number of those longevity estimates. Most come up late 80's-early 90's for me. I must say that the process of waiting until age 70 to collect benefits (I'm still a few years out) does test one's resolve. It does take a measure of patience and an almost spiritual faith that it will all work out in the end. If you have a day where you start feeling your age, you can easily start second guessing your decision. I have several siblings who have collected far more than they've paid into social security, so I tell myself it wouldn't be the end of the world if I come up short and my
  4. Your point about people below the poverty line, etc., being the least likely to see a benefit cut is well taken, but I'm not so sure that would happen. Depends on who is in power if and when the program gets cut, right? Keep in mind that there is going to be a huge constituency of people who delayed collecting benefits who are going to be pretty upset if their benefits get slashed more simply because they delayed collecting benefits, which is why I think it will have to be an across the board cut rather than a progressive one. Also, most financial advisors advise that starting collecting benef
  5. If you're reasoning that someone who is already financially secure ought to start collecting SS as early as possible because it's just icing on the financial security cake, I would question how many financial advisors would agree with that. Maybe if you've got millions in liquid assets, but I think there are too many unknown variables for most people to cavalierly take that approach. I would also doubt how many Americans truly have the financial security required to adopt that approach. I base this assessment on the constant dire reports on the American public's dismal lack of fina
  6. Risks that need to be considered: future payouts will be cut due to US government's growing fiscal problems. (Were this to happen, would probably be an across the board percentage cut, so better to delay benefits so base subject to cut will be as high as possible) lower cost overseas destinations become untenable due to either climate change, geopolitical tensions, or socio-economic pressures you may be forced to repatriate to your home country for personal reasons (medical, family, divorce, etc.) medical and long-term care costs (whether overseas or in US) M
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