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Monomial

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About Monomial

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  1. But you have to admit it is an interesting system... MP's are considered to be representatives, and are afforded the opportunity to vote their conscience, even if it is different from their constituents. That is the basis of representative, rather than direct democracy. The people's option if they disagree is to vote them out at the next election. On the other hand, the Prime Minister is elected by the parliament, but for some reason those same principles don't apply. The difference, of course, is that parliament is allowed to make laws, where the people are not. Not saying this is right or wrong, but there is definitely a noticeable hypocrisy in the system. It is interesting that parliament expects the people to accept representative democracy, but then they demand direct democracy for themselves. Isn't there an argument that Boris, being the elected Prime Minister, be allowed to serve in that capacity according to his consicience, and that parliament should simply vote him out with a vote of no confidence if they disagree with his actions? After all, that is the law they apply to themselves and their constituents...
  2. According to Bloomberg, he has now stated clearly that he intends to break the law and leave on the 31st, even without a deal. Whether he will actually do this or not is still anyone's guess, but he definitely needs the EU to believe this is case if he hopes to win any concessions from them. The second half of October should be very interesting, especially if the October 19 deadline passes and he really doesn't send the letter. I suspect if there is a deal, it will be negotiated in those final days after Oct. 19. High stakes game of chicken.
  3. Crossy gave you the location. Go there all the time. The market itself is huge, but the area for each individual fruit or vegetable is well defined so you can find what you are looking for, and only about a third of the market is actually for fresh produce. The rest consists of warehouses and small shops. I have never seen an export company there. I would not be surprised to find an export company has a depot there, but you would need to find the export company first, who would then direct you where in the market to drop off your product. There certainly aren't any signs advertising for export. This is very much geared at the Thai domestic market.
  4. Remain was also ahead in the polls in 2016 when Leave won. There is an interesting phenomenon that occurs in polling where people are biased towards the status quo. It is the same thing that causes people to respond "I'm fine" in social conversations, when they are anything but. But that bias vanishes when the curtain is closed on the polling booth and they are forced to make a choice. It's not a big bias, but it is enough that you can't discount it entirely when numbers are this close. What is driving Brexit at the core is that many are fed up with the status quo. They want something else, even if that something else is worse. And the more you hammer home how bad that something else is, the more they simply repress their true feelings...right up until the curtain closes on the polling booth. Because people vote with emotions, not with their head. I haven't seen anything that leads me to believe the situation is better for the majority in the UK, so I am distrustful of a poll that says otherwise. My prediction is that if you had another vote today, you would see almost exactly the same result as 2016. Those that are benefitting from the status quo are still benefitting. Those that are marginalized are still marginalized. For all the bluster by the political establishment, there has been almost no change.
  5. Ahh...the religion of progress. The world's most popular contemporary religion. It dwarfs Christianity in size, but is just as much based in faith as any of them. Just because we have evolved consciousness because it is better adapted to our current environment, does not imply that we are better or improving vs. the past. There is no inherent direction to adaption. Over millenia the environment will likely change, and it is very possible that consciousness and this simian form we inhabit today could actually become a liability. Our species might then die out, being less well suited to the environment. and maybe rats will rule the world. There is no such thing as a direction of evolution. It is just constant change that always adapts to its environment. There is no reason to believe tomorrow will be better or worse, just different. Progress is a short term illusion, just like believing the stock market will continue to go up because it has in the recent past. You are correct that everything is relative, but there is no guarantee that things have to advance. It foolish to think that we will ever be able to travel to this new planet except in our imagination. It might happen for our descendants, but it very well might not. The question of why something like this matters is well worth asking. and there is no guarantee that it will benefit anyone. The truth is, as a curious species, we simply want to explore for exploration sake, and it may very well be an incredible waste of resources and "no big deal" as Bert says. I think going to a church on Sunday is useless, but millions of people still expend resources doing it. Any attempt to make science more than that is hubris, and is no different from any other kind of religious fundamentalism. Maybe Bert is right and we shouldn't be wasting tax money on it. Do we waste tax money on other religions? Something to think about...
  6. ACH is still working for me as of Sep. 11. Just received an ACH transfer yesterday.
  7. I see a franchising opportunity for someone to sell cheap, inexpensive single use plastic bags on the street in front of every 7-11. I'm sure the law will only prohibit their use by retail chains. Otherwise garbage bags will be illegal. Since a typical plastic bag costs 30 satang, I would imagine a budding entrepeneur can make quite a good living selling bags for a baht each. Kind of like the copy shops at every government office. Ring up your purchase and "please go outside and buy a bag". Problem solved.
  8. Does anyone on this forum know how to locate large abattoirs for pigs near northern Bangkok? Specifically around the Talat Thai area? I am trying to source a large number of a specific gland from the neck of pigs. These are not traditionally used as food and are not available at the market. Talking with the vendors at the market, the glands we want are removed before they receive them. So I need to find out what happens to them and if the slaughterhouse would be willing to sell them. I need to purchase a couple of kg of glands per day, but the actual size is quite small...only around 25 - 30g per pig. So this means I need several hundred pigs per day. Is anyone familiar with this part of the industry? How can I find a local abattoir to speak with? The market vendors are unwilling to disclose where they get their product so I can follow the chain back to the source. Thanks for any assistance.
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