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CMBob

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Posts posted by CMBob


  1. 56 minutes ago, cusanus said:

    Maybe she read this: http://www.khaosodenglish.com/news/2019/10/10/health-insurance-will-be-mandatory-for-retiree-visa-holders/. A friend of mine with an O-A has renewed twice and has never had to leave the country, so I don't believe you've got that one right.  Then there's this one: https://www.ttrweekly.com/site/2019/05/hefty-insurance-hovers-over-thai-visa/

    The first article you quote starts out:  "Starting Oct. 31, foreigners over 50 entering the country with an O-A visa must show that they have valid health insurance covering their period of stay, deputy public health minister Sathit Pitutecha said."  That clearly will be the rule for people who obtain an O-A visa after October 31, 2019 (or, perhaps, for those who obtained an 0-A visa prior to November 1, 2019, and first entered Thailand after October 31st, 2019).  I was referring to people already here before November 1, 2019, who are here on an O-A visa and are either going to grab a second year (by, let's say, hopping over to Burma and back) or who, at the end of their first or second year, apply for an extension based on retirement or marriage.  Do you happen to see anything promulgated by Immigration (Police) that indicates there will be any retroactive application of the new insurance rule to those people?  I'm not saying 100% that it won't happen (although, for people grabbing onto their second year by a border hop, it defies understanding how that will be enforced....is airport or border-crossing Immigration going to say you can't come in or get your second year without showing your new long-stay insurance?) but I've seen nothing that says it will happen to those already here prior to November 1, 2019.  

    What we agree on is that the new rule is clear that no Thai embassy/consulate in another country will apparently issue an 0-A visa to one of their citizens after October 31st unless the citizen provides as part of their application proof of the new "long-stay" insurance.  Starting next week, perhaps we might start getting reports from people who have already been here on an O-A visa and we'll start to understand if any retroactive application is applied for those seeking extensions within Thailand.


  2. 4 hours ago, NancyL said:

    .......This week will be busy as people try to do their retirement extensions ahead of the October 31 deadline for health insurance.  

    I take it you believe that people holding an O-A visa issued before November 1, 2019, have to obtain the insurance to obtain something (which I would guess would be an extension based on retirement or marriage given the "second" year of the O-A visa is only obtained by doing a re-entry into the country).  Presuming that's what you're saying or suggesting, why do you believe that?

     


  3. Unless the internet is in error (e.g., see Bangkok Full Moon ), the actual full moon in November of 2019 is November 12th.  While perhaps different areas celebrate Loy Krathong on different dates, the opening ceremony here in Chiangmai is November 10th at Thaphae Gate and the big parade ("Grand Krathong Float Processions Contest") is on November 12th (and that's the end of festivities here in Chiangmai).  One can obtain the entire schedule of events here in Chiangmai at the municipal website (see  CM Municipal)


  4. 3 hours ago, NancyL said:

    I guess I used too many words in my posts.  Hubby's original visa was an O-A, mine was an O, both obtained in the U.S. over a decade ago.   Since then we've applied for yearly extensions due to retirement in Chiang Mai.  So, is he going to be required to have insurance and not me?

    In my opinion, neither of you will have to obtain the Thai long-stay insurance UNLESS the Thai authorities alter the rules to require those of us getting annual extensions (based on retirement or whatever) within Thailand to get it.  If that happens (which I see no reason to believe as it hasn't been suggested by Thai authorities so far), a whole bunch of us will be in the same lousy boat.


  5. 16 hours ago, NancyL said:

    .....So, does this mean that Hubby will have to show proof of health insurance, but I won't?  Incidentally, he just did his annual extension about 10 days ago.  It expires on November 15, but he applied early and nothing was said about insurance required since his expiration is after October 31.  He has 800,000 baht in a Thai bank as his financial proof, so maybe that had some bearing.

     

    My annual extension is due in mid-February and I hope they have all this sorted by then.  Incidentally, I have a monthly income in excess of 65,000 baht coming into a Thai bank, so I don't know if that will make difference in wanting proof of insurance, since I can't show a cash reserve in Thailand the way that Hubby can. 

    So far, the only health insurance requirement that's surfaced is one enforced by Thai embassies/consulates in one's home country....and, under the language of the police order, it's only to be applied to people who obtain an O-A Visa in their home country after October 31, 2019.  Unless that changes, I don't think either you or hubby have any concerns.

    [Some assert that there is one dicey area....where somebody, let's say, obtained an O-A Visa in their home country on October 15, 2019, but didn't first enter the country until after October 31, 2019; however, I personally don't buy that as those people weren't required to have the insurance when they got their O-A Visas and surely airport immigration will only see a proper O-A Visa in the passport and will stamp them in for their first year.]

     

    As far as I'm concerned, the only worry we (you, hubby, myself, and many others) might have in the future is if/when Thai authorities apply a health insurance requirement to those obtaining annual extensions in-country.  So far, there's no rule saying that will happen.

    • Thanks 1

  6. 3 hours ago, McTavish said:

    I didn't believe it either but a read thru of the law could be interpreted as including all extensions. 

    Section (6), of the relatively new police order, the only part that has any reference at all to health insurance, states:  "Only for an alien, who has been granted Non-Immigrant Visa Class O-A, must buy a Thai health insurance online..."    

     

    The language is fairly clear to me but perhaps you might advise as to how one can interpret the language in the police order to say/suggest/imply that the long-stay health insurance is a requirement for anybody who will obtain any annual extension.  


  7. 15 hours ago, davehowden said:

    What does this "bank letter" show/state, and how is it different to a "bank statement".

    The "bank letter" is simply a letter from the bank which, in Thai, verifies that you have the account and there is "x" amount in it.  So far, I've not heard anything about banks changing the format of their standard letter which they have on their computers (perhaps at some point they'll change the letter to discuss a bit more about the history of the account, e.g., that 800k baht has been in there for 60+ days or so).

    "Bank statements" (at least how most people are using that term) simply means photocopies of one's passbook (which, of course, like all copies, you must place your signature).


  8. 22 minutes ago, Dcheech said:

     .....3) “A copy of every page of my passbook which I updated on my way to CM IMM early, very early, in the morning.” ---- copy from tracyb-----

     

    That last one, I am not for sure exactly how I go about getting it. I have been told I need that done on the same day I submit my application/renewal docs.  Now just to be clear -  that is where you make a deposit or withdrawal on your account, showing activity (?) And then make copies of every page of the bank book. This is done on the same day I make my application??

     

    If that is so, I have to wait until the bank opens, and then make copies at a copy shop when it opens. This will put me at Immigration at about 930-10 o’clock in the morning. At the earliest.  

    My questions – Are all of the above steps correct for the 800K method? And regarding step 3. Is there any way to do that so I can get to immigration earlier than say 930??  I also realize I need to bring my updated bank book with me besides the copies to the IO.

     

    Any help, advice, directions, appreciated.

     

    Thank You.

    I keep the 800k in a dedicated account (term account...usually for 10-13 months per term) at Siam Commercial Bank and that passbook cannot be updated regardless of whether I or a bank teller sticks the passbook in the machine.  When I obtained the new-one year extension a few months back, I simply presented the bank letter and a copy of the passbook (which showed that the current term began in December of 2018) and there was no question or issue about any updating.

    However, from what I gather from some posts, some people have claimed that they've been required to update the passbook the day of application and I believe that most or all of these involve people who have kept their 800k in a regular savings account that is able to be updated (and able to be altered by small deposit or withdrawal) on the day of application.  If posters have personal experience with this issue at CM Immigration (please don't post here about Nakorn Nowhere), please advise.

    I'd also note that based on recent experiences of friends, you really don't need to get to Immigration early any more.  Some....even for annual extensions....have gone in the early afternoon and been out of there in less than an hour.  I arrived for my annual extension at 11:05 and was finished (including a new re-entry permit) at 12:25PM....not too shabby.  

    Based on some reports, you might want to avoid going out there on the day before or after a Thai holiday (one where Immigration is closed) as the office could be very busy. 

    • Like 1

  9. 3 hours ago, CMNightRider said:

    Thai Immigration is currently purging their country of western expats.  I don't believe the westerners are leaving fast enough so the Thai government decided to require forgeiners to purchase useless Thai Health Insurance plans to speed up the purge.  

    Your constant negative attitude is rather amazing and, presuming you live here, one wonders why you continue to do so.

    I don't agree at all with your premise.  Everybody I know here in Chiangmai finds CM Immigration requirements to be relatively easy to comply with.  As to your health insurance comment, nobody who is now in Thailand has to comply with it (it only applies to those who obtain an O-A visa in their home country after October 30th).

    • Like 2
    • Confused 1

  10. 17 hours ago, billsmart said:

    No, but you do have to file a TM.28. I'd suggest you go to the Chiang Mai Immigrations office to do that.....I don't know the answer to this one for Chiang Mai... 

    This is the Chiang Mai forum and, while people do try to be helpful, it would be most helpful if people would not pronounce that some immigration requirement applicable in another province is also required by CM Immigration. 

    No TM28 is currently required to be filed at Chiang Mai Immigration.  

    • Thanks 1
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  11. 16 hours ago, WaveHunter said:

    Thank you so much for your informative reply.  Actually I just decided to go over to Immigration in Jomtien and speak with an officer there to get some reliable fact-based information.

    Smart to double check the rules.  Compliance is actually fairly easy so long as you know how your particular provincial Immigration office applies those rules.

     

    You apparently were asking a Jomtien Immigration officer about TM30 rules that apply up here in the boonies (i.e., Chiang Mai).  While that officer might know something about that, I personally wouldn't trust it given the disparity of how the various provinces apply the various rules.  For example only, we've seen lots of posts involving some provinces requiring TM30 updating even for being gone from your registered address more than 24 hours in-country (not true in Chiang Mai) and many reports of the requirement to file TM28 forms (which, so far, isn't ever wanted in Chiang Mai).  Uniform application throughout the provinces probably makes sense overall but, on the other hand, my continued hope is that Chiang Mai stays the course with its current rules regardless of what other provinces do or don't.  

     

    • Like 1

  12. 2 hours ago, WaveHunter said:

    Regarding 1a, do you mean I do not have to go to Imm or I do have to go?

    As you say your condo office will file the TM30 for you, you do NOT have to go to Immigration relating to that.  But make sure your condo office gives you a printout of something that shows they did the TM30 for you and keep that with your passport.

    Now, when you go for an extension at CM Immigration, they likely will have you take that printout up to the third floor to be replaced with a smaller TM30 Receipt of Notification form that they'll staple in the back of your passport (similar to what they do with the 90-day address Receipt of Notification).  If and when you leave and re-enter Thailand, you or your condo office needs to "update" that TM30 Receipt of Notification.  So far, there's no need to do that if you're only traveling within Thailand.

    Your comments about the office across from Promenada relate to years' old posts. Now that Immigration here has moved to its new building, you get everything there (residence certificates are obtained on the second floor). 

    • Thanks 1

  13. Yes, if it is a fixed account (term account) where the term comes to the end, the banks switch the accounts at that time to a regular savings account (and then the fees periodically start for inactivity if the amount is below a certain level).  I am unaware that the banks even offer a fixed term account for amounts as low as 2,500 baht...but perhaps they do (my experience with fixed term accounts relates to the retirement extension requirements).

     


  14. 23 hours ago, stillhereandlovinit said:

    I landed back in Savanabhumi on Saturday morning, walked to the transfer desk to continue up to Chiang Mai, went through customs etc and did the TM30 in Thai Airways lounge while waiting for my connecting flight on the app. A 2 minute job.

     

    1 hour ago, stament said:

    You can do the TM30 stamp in BKK? Where is your TM30 place of registration, CM or BKK?

    He did it online (as he mentioned he did it "on the app.").

     

    I presume he's talking about the Section38 app.  I just registered for that yesterday and, after pushing the final submit button, got a "registration succesful" screen.  Then, within a minute, got an email which prodded me into clicking on a link to verify my email and whatever.  Then, within another minute later, got another email with my username and password for the system.  I don't intend to log onto the system until near the end of October upon returning from a short trip out of Thailand.....and that will be my big test to see if I can easily update the TM30 registration with my phone.

     

    Stillhereandlovinit:  A couple of questions: (1) You flew into BKK and continued via the transfer system but you say you went through customs in BKK? (I've done that too but the customs part always came at CNX).  (2)  When you say you used the app, do you mean you updated (versus filing any new TM30)?  No big deal but I'm curious why you updated while in BKK as you hadn't returned to your TM30 registered address in Chiangmai as yet.


  15. 9 hours ago, No1 said:

    Hello @emptypockets, I am inquiring about bar closing hours. It seems I have used the term "curfew" wrong. My apologies for the confusion.

    Nothing has changed in CM and your friend (mentioning extending bar trading hours to 2AM or later) is referring to a couple of articles in the paper where Thai authorities discussed the concept; however, unless I read those articles wrong, they were talking about only extending the hours in Pattaya and/or Bangkok.

    • Thanks 1

  16. In Chiangmai, you can renew your annual extension up to 45 days before the expiration date.  And, as others have stated, the date of renewal and expiration date will always remain the same regardless if you renew 1 day before or 45 days before.  Apparently some Immigration offices will only allow renewal up to 30 days prior to expiration (although there are a few reports of people being allowed to do it earlier than that if you'll be out of the country for that 30-day time period (and can show them proof of airline tickets or whatever). 

    • Like 1

  17. On 9/13/2019 at 5:24 AM, Mapguy said:

    There was one surprise in it for me:

     

    -A copy of every page in my passport that had information or a stamp on it, as requested.  

    It seems to vary year to year and officer to officer with respect to what documents they want for an extension based on retirement.  While most years they don't ask me for a signed copy of my passport page showing the original Non-O, a few times they've asked for a signed copy of that (which makes some sense as all annual extensions are based on that original Non-O).  A couple of years back, I presented all the normal documents and then the officer asked for a signed copy of every single filled-out page of my passport including pages with stamps from other countries (and the officer was rather surprised when I simply reached into my folder and provided same).

     

    The safe thing, it seems, is to take along with you a complete signed copy of everything in your passport just in case the given officer requests it.  


  18. 2 hours ago, EricTh said:

    The confusion comes when immigration allowed the 65k option for some applicants without embassy letter when the rules said it is necessary. 

     

    The rules only required a certain amount of monthly income; however, the requirement of an embassy/consulate affidavit to show/prove that was just how they applied it.  Heck, I thought it was quite nice of Immigration to lessen that requirement for those who could no longer get the embassy/consulate letter.  And, as you suggested before, it would be nice if they also lessened that requirement for those seeking the combo method.  Maybe they will (or won't). 


  19. 2 hours ago, EricTh said:

     

    Well, the other forummers have already tried the combo method without embassy affidavit and their applications were not accepted as reported in this forum.

     

    If you would have read the next sentence that paragraph in my post, you would have learned that's exactly what I said.

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