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BANGKOK 21 July 2019 20:26

SometimezaGreatNotion

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About SometimezaGreatNotion

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  1. Yes I will try again for the marriage extension. The Chang Mai office seems less chaotic now that it has moved back from the various offices it had at Promenada Mall to the government building near the airport. Thanks for the information about getting a 1-year multiple entry marriage visa initiated from Savannakhet or Ho Chi Minh City. It is good to know there is a nearby backup in case some parameter goes awry in applying for the marriage extension here in Chiang Mai. My wife keeps telling me no problem, everything will be easy. But it wasn't the first time, and she should know better since she is a retired government officer!
  2. My first 1-year extension ends in December, and I'm thinking of changing it from retirement to marriage. Can anyone summarize the advantages / disadvantages of a "multi-entry Non-O marriage visa" compared to a marriage extension? And how is the process of getting "multi-entry Non-O marriage visa"? I married a Thai woman two years ago (legal Thai marriage), and last year after retiring and moving here, my first effort at getting a marriage extension was a torturous Kafkaesque nightmare for me at the time (was still adapting with a bit of physical and cultural shock, and we had unlucky draw of a young lady IO who seemed clinically obsessive-compulsive; for example, she spent more than 15 minutes arranging things on her desk and cleaning the floor under her desk before meeting applicants). That experience, plus the looming insurance requirement changes for O-A and possibly also visa extensions, have me fishing for a retirement Plan B to start edging toward the front burner. For example, the World Health Organization rates Columbia's health care system 22nd most efficient in the world, compared to Thailand 47th rank (United States 37th). ["Measuring overall health system performance for 191 countries."]. Additionally, Columbia makes it easy to qualify for a 3-year retirement (provide evidence of only $750 per month social security, or similar other private pension, etc.). And the "...premium for public health insurance is only $75 per month, and co-pay for lab tests, prescription medications, and other services is only $4" [https://internationalliving.com/the-best-places-to-retire/]. I like it here much more than living in the United States, and don't know if my wife could tolerate being away from her Thai relatives and her comfortable house, but I am more seriously looking at alternatives now.
  3. I think it's cool to have some non-pervasive, limited cultural rules based on a theoretical non-violent spiritual tradition. Hell, I didn't even mind living in Riyadh for a couple of years. One can always brew homemade vino from wild yeast! Just glad to be away from anything-goes Western liberalism, which seeks to apply some "natural" based metric system morality to everyone. Good luck with that! How are those cultures working out?
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