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Thai-Spy

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Posts posted by Thai-Spy


  1. As far as I know foreign exchange of the Ringitt has not been allowed, by Malaysia, since the meltdown 10 years ago.

    Ringgit to Baht and Baht to Ringgit exchanges can both be done easily in either country. The spread is almost always substantially smaller in Malaysia. To get Ringgit at BKK usually means a trip to several different exchange counters as not all of them handle the currency or have it at a given time.


  2. Assuming the buyer doesn't want it as a going concern, but just as an alternative to establishing a new company...

    Longer answer:

    If the company has no liabilities going forward (especially liens, loans, taxes and termination obligations to unwanted employees) and no assets, its value is only the difference in cost between a cold start-up and the cost to legally transfer its ownership, change directors, amend the charter or by-laws, etc., plus the slight benefits of having an operational history (esp. tax filings and annual audits) for prior years and the fact it may be grandfathered in for some other valuable considerations.

    Shorter answer:

    Unless there's something truly unusual about it, the formal structure of the company is likely worth 10's of thousands of baht, but not 100's of thousands of baht.


  3. zzz - dude i dont want to spend us80 for a freeking two month visa (mailers/visas) hence why i stopped applying in usa. 40us a month for privilage of holiday in thailnd - a bit rich no? thats why i started runnin'

    then i realized what it cost me even for two two-month visas incl a train to penang. way way too much. so i started running... at least there was a bottle of red and carton of smokes and viagra - which i could swap for a bottle of jwred. sweeeeet.

    i go home every year and honestly only spend about 6 months in thailand anyway. like i said - that love affair ended about 8 yrs ago.

    solution: three month visas. you can get two (or 3) at home and one abroad in any given year.

    braham: youre right fun is GONE, way gone.

    they spent 20-30 years building this huge tourism base with friendly attitudes, making people feel welcome, a fun enjoyable holiday destination with a minimum of hassles. on the present course, it's going to take them about 2-3 years to destroy most of that . it just seems to defy all logical explanation.

    That's one way to look at it. On the other hand that same system was too often abused by people becoming perpetual tourists often for purposes of working illegally. A correction of those vulnerabilities was long overdue.

    It's doubtful that there will be any large impact on tourism overall. The burden of compliance isn't that great and we're simply in an adjustment period while the new "wisdom" is disseminated around the world and Thailand itself gets up to speed on implementation.

    The central message remains that Thailand has gotten somewhat tired of being the world's flophouse. Money is no longer enough; Thailand wants people who show up, enjoy, spend and (above all!) go home, or those willing to make permanent connections to Thailand by marriage, business, retirement, etc.

    Very sorry for the well-intentioned and well-to-do under-50 bachelors, but you have to realize that you closely match the problematic demographic Thailand is seeking to control.


  4. Just speculating, but the creator of the video is likely of limited mental capacity and has had some traumatic experience related to Thailand, probably within the context of a romantic relationship. Unfortunately he's unable to separate the issues in his mind and heart and lashes out without thinking. We get this sort of crap in our corporate email from time to time, too; one even went so far as to Photoshop a juxtaposition of a Thai VIP, certain body parts of a woman and animal waste. It's sad but it happens and people who are that bent out of shape deserve pity as much as condemnation.


  5. I saw a nice comment today in The Nation by a reader who said, that nudity was the norm in Thailand prior to Victorian influence. The primary reason for nudity was the heat. I believe this to be true based on Thai artwork that I have seen that depicts Thai women topless. I suspect this may have the culture minister in a bit of a bind to selective pick what parts of Thai culture are acceptable. To be correct there should be no restriction on honoring that part of Thai history.

    There are any number of organizations in Bangkok and Chonburi that are active in preserving this aspect of cultural heritage, although the rock music and knee-high boots are a bit of an anachronism.


  6. P.S. I'm not, and never have been in the travel industry, and the forgoing is purely my opinion. Maybe the professionals out there would like to comment, and shoot me down in flames if I am wrong?

    Other than pretending that sex industry is not Thailand's biggest attraction, you've hit the nail right on the head! :o

    Well I'm not going to get into an argument over this, but I spent many years in the UK between 1983 and 2000, and I worked in the city. I can still recall literally dozens of people that I met/and or knew from all walks of life who, when they discovered I had Thai wife, would recount the wonderful holidays they had had in Thailand - many going for repeat visits.

    I can put my hand on my heart and honestly say that not a single person that I met had the slightest interest in the Thai sex industry; they were all married couples - some old, some young,some with children, and they had their holidays all over Thailand, from Bangkok, to Phuket, to Koh Samui, and even one young Irish couple who adored Pattaya, enjoyed the red light district, but certainly never indulged in the sex for sale. I had six adult members of my family over during new Year's and before that some other married couples from the UK. They all had wonderful holidays, without the need to partake in sexual pleasures.

    Yes, there is a particular section of the tourist industry who come for the sex, and it's unlikely that many of these will be put off by the current negative factors. If anything it might encourage them, in the belief that there may be even more girls available.

    How the sex tourists rate in their dollar spending compared to non- sex tourists' spending is anyone's guess.

    Your arguments are good and well-supported by other facts. We saw a study someone had done trying to quantify sex-tourism from Farangland and it was estimated at just 5-15% of all tourism by farang adults.


  7. Nothing is going to make the extra 90 day gap between arrival and departure dates disappear from the immigration computers, at least for the foreseeable future.

    Although it would be a blessing if immigration's computer system would access this data at the point of entry and calculate the "Admitted Until" date on the fly (rather than the tedious calculations by hand from stamps), as things currently stand it won't be checked electronically when he seeks to re-enter.*

    It's surprising that the traveler got away with it, but those are the breaks. So the problem becomes one of the old overstay possibly being detected on a future entry.

    The worst possible solution would be to remove passport pages or alter the stamps. It's illegal in both Thailand and the country that issued the passport.

    The safest solution is to replace the passport. Any other solution risks detection when he seeks to re-enter Thailand.

    Immigration would probably have the right to retroactively enforce the overstay fine. Whether they would also deny him entry at the checkpoint can only be guessed at, but the cost of a new passport can be viewed as relatively cheap insurance compared to the price of his air tickets (and perhaps the cost of a same-day one way ticket to repatriate him if he's denied entry).

    (*Note: There's always a remote risk the excess of days in conjunction with lack of an overstay has been noted somewhere and his record is flagged or he's on a Deny Entry list, but in practice it isn't very likely.)


  8. The OP may be referencing something that was posted on ThaiVisa several weeks ago, at least as regards possession of original passports. That post in turn may just have been the set up of a joke, but the first of the month (any month) and the first day of a calendar quarter would be a logical time to implement any new non-emergency policy.


  9. There is no absolute external indicator of a past pregnancy except perhaps a surgical scar from an episiotomy. Stretch marks can be caused by any rapid weight gain especially in conjunction with poor overall health or chronic vitamin deficiency, dehydration or genetic factors. Persistence of the linea negra is more common in dark-skinned Asians and can be due to hormonal factors not related to pregnancy. A scar similar to that from a Caesarian section can have other surgical causes.


  10. We made a few phone calls about this just this morning. It should be possible to use your own dongle, but there can be configuration issues.

    Assistance Centers are being set up, but we could only get a partial list: In Bangkok this will include Sukhumvit Soi 4, Sukhumvit Soi 23, and Suriyawongse Road. In Pattaya: Walking Street, Beach Road and Soi 6 adjacent to the Public Library. Experienced personnel in each location will be available to help you with your dongle although there will be a fee for the service.

    When using your dongle in certain interfaces and ports it's important that you keep the protective cover on it.


  11. The police detained Atu until Mr. Nerisio recovers so that they can negotiate and make an agreement over medical costs etc.

    This is the third news report I've read today that makes reference to detaining folks until they make restitution to their victims (the other two were accidents: a drunk farang on a motorbike on Beach Road, and the other a Thai motorist running a red light and crashing at Sukhumvit & Soi Chaiypruek), with no mention of any arrest.

    Is the arrest part of the story just not being mentioned, or are we experiencing a "kinder gentler" version of policing?

    The cops frequently get a piece of the action so they're often inclined to restitution rather than arrest.


  12. I hate to quote Trink, but this is an excellent time to remind yourself of "TIT".

    If you want a view, you better buy the view.

    And, can we all form a circle and do a joint communal " SMIRK " at politicians pretending that Thai beach resorts can appeal to really affluent people who'd frequent the Cote d'Azur the famous old world resort towns...

    Hint: those places have a legal & planning tradition that makes those actual top class locations.

    For investing in Pattaya..... Stick to that room+bathroom on Soi Bua Khao, it's about the level you can reasonably expect to have your expectations met.

    SMIRK... The "Smiling-Makes-It-Real Kingdom"? An apt acronym for the place where bureaucrats and nabobs make grand and self-congratulatory pronouncements that don't have a snowball's chance of becoming reality.


  13. Changing the landscape of Thailand? No. Nationwide the new regs aren't going to matter much. In places where the legitimate short-stay tourists go the new regs aren't going to matter much. But certain areas and business segments where the chronic visa runners were in a higher percentage are certainly going to start feeling it soon.

    It wouldn't be that surprising to see VE regs tightened even further, to perhaps 60 visa-less days per year. The vast majority of true tourists wouldn't even approach using up that quota. If the government likes extra money from selling extra tourist visas, what's to stop them? Any income they've seen so far has been diluted a bit by the appreciation of the baht, but there's still more out there to be made.

    Meanwhile watch more bars than usual go up for sale, more cheap apartments to stand empty, low-to-mid range restaurants shuttered, mostly in the farang ghettoes.


  14. The article as posted does not say the guilty party is of the Muslim faith.

    And while we support the death penalty in some instances, we have not (nor has anyone here) seen the evidence or testimony in the case. He was sentenced to die and then the sentence was commuted to life in prison. Nowhere does it say he was sentenced to be murdered in prison. Hoping for that sort of thing is not only distasteful, but undermines the very notion of and hope for a meaningful judicial process.

    To put it another way, if you ever got a prison term, would prefer the judge or the other inmates decide how your time was served? Mr. Arif's case is an extreme one, but if you accidentally killed someone, yet the court convicted you of murder, would you want to be at the mercy of a prison mob?

    Our sympathies in this matter are wholly with the Thongnarkthae family. But one of the hallmarks of civilization is how much civility it will show to the uncivilized.

    How many non-Muslims you have seen with the "Mohammad" as the part of the name? He is Pakistani and of course he is Muslim as his name suggests. :D

    By the way what is ur point in the post? :o

    Reason of edit: posted comments at wrong place.

    Pakistan is 3% non-Muslim. People in minority groups often give themselves or their children names from the dominant ethnic or religious group as protective coloration. Further, he may be apostate, just as there are Latin-American atheists named Jesus.

    The point of the post is to find out who gets the real points:

    1) Don't leap to conclusions based on one news article.

    2) Justice is a matter for courts not mobs (whether they''re imprisoned behind bars or keyboards).

    he cut the girl into pieces....if that doent deserve capital punishment i dont know what would...i dont think it was an accident he cut her up...

    It deserves, in the view of many, capital punishment, which is a judicial exercise reserved to the state alone and which should be a fairly clinical and dispassionate process.

    There is a huge leap downward in social values from approving of an execution to standing on the sidelines cheering on a mob to stomp someone to death.


  15. Or the imms are plainly brainless.

    We have a winner! Yes, they just don't know how to read their own rule book.

    Actually, it "seems" the OP should get a full 30 day stamp.

    1) He's got more than enough spare days to get back to his anniversary date, April 4, without breaking 90.

    2) Once he's reached it, he'll be shedding past days in-country at the same time he's adding new ones.

    So at no time would he ever go over 90 days out of 6 months, if he stayed through April 27 (March 28 +30 days).

    Unfortunately it doesn't seem like the regulations are written in a way that would make this easy to explain.


  16. 1) Is there any way to check under her name to see if there is any record of her giving birth to a child?

    Officially, no, not without a court order. In practice, yes.

    I guess it probably would have been in Bangkok but not sure.

    Location is irrelevant, it's at the national level.

    Is there a national registry of births or is it local to each city or do you have to check with each hospital?

    See above.

    We're not married so will they give out this information to a stranger not connected with the person who gave birth?

    Not likely, unless you do get married then you'd have a right to know.

    2) Is there any way to find out if she's been married before?

    Yes.

    What sort of records on marriages are a kept?

    Marriages and divorces both as well as marriages ended by death of one spouse. Always includes name of both parties, date and place of registration, identity numbers on both parties and if marriage ended often some data on why.

    Same sort of question as with the birth records. If I look at her ID card will that tell me if she was legally married before? I can't read any Thai so if anyone has some help about this I'd need to see a picture or a copy of the Thai words that distinguish between a married and unmarried person on the ID card.

    น.ส. ("nong sao") = Miss = Either never married or was once married, now not, and went through some hard steps to not be a "Mrs" anymore.

    นาง ("nang) = Mrs. = Has been married, may still be married, etc.

    3) If an unmarried Thai couple have a child, can the father even get legal custody of the child?

    Both lawful parents of a Thai child have equal rights of custody until a court says otherwise.

    I would have thought that the mother would automatically get custody unless they were married.

    No, although it would weigh against the father in a custody fight.

    The child is a boy if that is of any significance.

    No significance at all until a court gets involved, then only a little.

    If the mother wanted to get custody of the child, what would be involved and would it be expensive to do?

    If a court has already given custody to the father, that's that, unless there's a significant change in the status of either parent and a new court case is undertaken. If a court hasn't ruled, then she still has custody rights in full.

    Edited for clarity.


  17. When you're in a profession that requires you to be out in it during Songkran, it's not as much fun. For one thing there's the aforementioned road hazard. For another, you have to be so careful with phones, cameras, documents, etc.


  18. The article as posted does not say the guilty party is of the Muslim faith.

    And while we support the death penalty in some instances, we have not (nor has anyone here) seen the evidence or testimony in the case. He was sentenced to die and then the sentence was commuted to life in prison. Nowhere does it say he was sentenced to be murdered in prison. Hoping for that sort of thing is not only distasteful, but undermines the very notion of and hope for a meaningful judicial process.

    To put it another way, if you ever got a prison term, would prefer the judge or the other inmates decide how your time was served? Mr. Arif's case is an extreme one, but if you accidentally killed someone, yet the court convicted you of murder, would you want to be at the mercy of a prison mob?

    Our sympathies in this matter are wholly with the Thongnarkthae family. But one of the hallmarks of civilization is how much civility it will show to the uncivilized.


  19. I am sure that in the next month or so we will finally learn how immigration interprets the new rules - one thing is for sure it will not be consistent and unlikely to be fair.

    Indeed, tomorrow is the 181st day since 1 October 2006. The TV/VE angst should quickly grow to new heights.

    The fact that immigration checkpoints can't comprehend and uniformly implement what seems a very simple policy is sad. But given that any Thai government project quickly becomes a petty fiefdom, it's not at all surprising.

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