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webfact

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  1. Most Bangkokians don't use ride-hailing apps, study finds By The Nation A survey by Assumption University has found that one-third of Bangkokians have never tried a ride-hailing app as consumers are looking for options, the institution said in a press release issued on Friday. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084523-most-bangkokians-dont-use-ride-hailing-apps-study-finds/
  2. Most Bangkokians don't use ride-hailing apps, study finds By The Nation A survey by Assumption University has found that one-third of Bangkokians have never tried a ride-hailing app as consumers are looking for options, the institution said in a press release issued on Friday. Assumption University’s Institute for Research and Academic Services in collaboration with GET, an app for two-wheeled ride-hailing, courier and food delivery services, conducted a research in November 2018 to survey the satisfaction and perception of users and service providers of Bangkok’s two-wheeled ride-hailing industry. According to the survey involving 1,234 Bangkokians and 605 legitimate motorcycle taxi drivers, the majority of consumers and motorcycle taxi drivers never tried a ride-hailing application for motorcycle taxi booking and they are looking for new and more applications to allow them to have more choices, healthy competition for better prices and services and to eliminate monopolisation. According to the survey, 79 per cent of Bangkokians use motorcycle taxi to commute. Females use the service more than males and younger generations use the service more than older ones. When inquired those who use motorcycle taxi service, 68 per cent of them use the service more than once a week and 23 per cent use it almost daily. The problems commonly found are long queue in rush hours, no service available in nearby areas, customer rejection, and no service during early morning and late night. At the same time, the study found Bangkokians would like to see improvement on safety, driver behaviour, and standardisation in price for motorcycle taxi. In the modern days when technology has stronger presence on everyday lives, 72 per cent of Bangkokians are aware of motorcycle taxi booking applications. However, despite the awareness that such applications can help make life more convenient, as high as 65 per cent of the people have never tried the service. The survey points out that if there’s a new application available in the market, most of Bangkokians up to 65 per cent are willing to try. Most of the interviewees provided the reasons that more choices in the market will benefit users as it will provide users with more options, competition will result in better prices and promotions and it can help improve the service. The main reasons to attract Bangkokians to an application are fares, speed, easy-to-use experience, insurance, good service and others. On the supply side, almost all of motorcycle taxi drivers, 96 per cent, are aware of motorcycle taxi hailing applications. But only 15 per cent have joined an application or applications. The reasons for not joining were there’s nothing attractive and they don’t know how to use an application and their jobs are already good. From the survey, a number of motorcycle taxi drivers thought that more applications in the market could be good for them as it would offer them more choices to join, eliminate monopolisation, encourage competition to help drivers gained more income and better benefits, as well as help expanding the market to get more customers. Good income and reliability are what drivers want in an application. The reasons to convince a driver to join an application are good income, reliability, life and accident insurance, and other factors like bonus or incentives and good treatment for drivers. Pinya Nittayakasetwat, GET Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, said: “GET has carried out various studies and surveys in order to truly understand Bangkok riders and drivers and how we can fulfil their needs. The survey conducted by AU Poll helped reaffirm many of our hypotheses. Ride-hailing application adoption here is growing but not as fast as it could due to a lack of choice in the market. Our arrival will help expand both the demand and supply side and promote healthy competition that will benefit both riders and drivers here in Bangkok. “Since our beta launch in December, we have proven that licensed ‘win’ drivers are eager to partner with a company that understands their needs. We are operating in 29 districts in Bangkok with many win drivers and our fleet continues to grow. We’re excited to fully launch in Bangkok within the coming weeks as we seek to provide another choice and make life easier for both riders and drivers in Bangkok.” Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30364200 -- © Copyright The Nation 2019-02-15
  3. Annual closure of the Gulf of Thailand - Feb 15-May 15 CHUMPORN, 15th February 2019 (NNT) – The Fisheries Department has announced the central area of the Gulf of Thailand will be closed until May, affecting Prachuapkirikan, Chumporn and Surat Thani, to allow for a regeneration of marine life. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084521-annual-closure-of-the-gulf-of-thailand-feb-15-may-15/
  4. Annual closure of the Gulf of Thailand - Feb 15-May 15 CHUMPORN, 15th February 2019 (NNT) – The Fisheries Department has announced the central area of the Gulf of Thailand will be closed until May, affecting Prachuapkirikan, Chumporn and Surat Thani, to allow for a regeneration of marine life. The announcement was issued by Assistant to the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives Niwat Suthimeechaikul, at a ceremony in Chumporn province. The closure is to last from February 15 to May 15 and is an annual recognition of essential marine life breeding, egg-laying and rearing in the Gulf of Thailand. The closure limits the types of fishing equipment that can be used in the central area of the Gulf of Thailand, covering a 27,000 square kilometer zone. Violation of the closure can incur fines from 5,000 to 30 million baht depending on the type of fishing equipment used and the value of marine life affected. Large hauls may result in criminal charges. -- nnt 2019-02-15
  5. Why is Thailand so popular for medical tourists? By The Thaiger Considered to be one of the most popular destinations for contemporary medical tourism, Thailand continues to see a surge in patients seeking top quality, affordable care. From Bangkok to Chiang Mai and the beaches of Phuket, thousands visit annually, combining luxury travel with first-rate quality care, for the ultimate medical tourism holiday. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084518-why-is-thailand-so-popular-for-medical-tourists/
  6. Why is Thailand so popular for medical tourists? By The Thaiger Considered to be one of the most popular destinations for contemporary medical tourism, Thailand continues to see a surge in patients seeking top quality, affordable care. From Bangkok to Chiang Mai and the beaches of Phuket, thousands visit annually, combining luxury travel with first-rate quality care, for the ultimate medical tourism holiday. It appears convenience is one key component as to why patients keep returning for invasive and non-invasive treatment. Several international airports service this South East Asian hub with non-stop flights to locations across Thailand including Phuket, Koh Samui, Chiang Mai and Pattaya. Low-cost internal flights mean travelling around is cheap and easy. But this is only scratching the surface. Significant financial injections from the Thai government has led to a genuine medical boom with major boosts to the country’s healthcare infrastructure. Full story: https://thethaiger.com/thai-life/why-is-thailand-so-popular-for-medical-tourists -- © Copyright The Thaiger 2019-02-15 
  7. U.S. Mission Thailand to Retirees: Retirement Planning U.S. Mission Thailand to Retirees: Why You Should Have a Will You are retired and content, living alongside tens of thousands of U.S. citizens who call Thailand home. Have you given thought to the last piece of the puzzle: having your final wishes carried out? Every year, the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, and U.S. Consulate in Chiang Mai, assist hundreds of bereaved families whose U.S. citizen relatives pass away in Thailand. We have seen the peace of mind that comes from them knowing what their loved ones wanted – and the hardship that comes from confusion and lack of preparation. Below, we share hard-earned lessons to help you care for your heirs and have your wishes met. Above all, this means writing a will and ensuring someone knows you have one. Notifying Loved Ones – Help Us Help You When we learn of a U.S. citizen’s passing, we endeavor to find the next of kin and help them work with Thai authorities on next steps like cremation or burial. Though Thai law governs this process, Thai police and hospital representatives frequently rely on the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate for confirmation and to relay instructions from the next of kin. Sometimes U.S. citizens do not have close family members who can serve as legal next of kin. Your will should clearly designate who you wish to act on your behalf, so we can make sure your wishes are followed quickly. The emergency contact you designate on passport renewals or in your STEP registration should also have this information. Do You Want to be Cremated, Buried, or Sent Home to the United States? When you pass away, do you wish to be cremated, or buried? In Thailand or in the United States? Or elsewhere? Who will pay for the funeral arrangements? In our experience, decisions on funeral arrangements are among the most difficult, emotionally fraught, and frustrating for friends and family. Death overseas adds another layer of complexity. Frequently, the deceased’s remains are held in a hospital morgue in Thailand pending directions from the next of kin or the decision maker designated in the will. This individual may be asked to pay storage fees, or costs associated with final medical care, before their loved one’s remains are released. They must then arrange for cremation or burial, and it gets more complex (and expensive) as they contemplate repatriating the remains to the United States. (The U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate can provide information and help to coordinate with local hospitals and police, but has no funds to assist with funeral arrangements or repatriation of remains.) You can help your family or other designee by indicating your wishes and setting aside sufficient funds to cover any necessary arrangements. Most importantly, make sure they can access those funds by providing them with a power of attorney. Who Will Inherit Your Assets in Thailand and in the United States? Thai and U.S. probate processes are separate and are governed by the laws in each country; your will should address both. Are you separated or estranged, but not divorced? Do you have a long-time boyfriend or girlfriend, but aren’t married? Do you have multiple children, or numerous siblings? Are you the last living relative? If you die without a clear primary next of kin, there can be long delays in the settlement of your estate. Worse still, your intended beneficiaries may find they have no recourse if Thai or U.S. law points to a different next of kin and you have not indicated your wishes in a will. And remember, a Thai partner in a “common law” marriage with a U.S. citizen is not recognized by the United States as next of kin – unless he or she is specified in the will. Do They Know What You Have? It is also very important you make a detailed list of your possessions and how you want them to be disbursed. While we have found the probate process in Thailand is typically sufficient to safeguard real property (land, condos, houses, etc.), it can be very difficult to account for other items between the time of death and notification of next of kin. This includes bank book information, cash and jewelry, and objects of sentimental value. The U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate can serve as provisional conservators for your estate if your loved ones are not in Thailand, but we are limited in our ability to immediately secure your possessions. Thai authorities can and frequently do assist at our request, but the surest way you can guarantee your loved ones receive what you bequeath to them is to spell it out in a will. You may wish to have the will translated into Thai and share it with Thai friends, as well. Who Will Ensure Your Will is Recovered? Once you have a will, have a strategy for making it known. Thai officials, the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate, and loved ones must all make consequential decisions immediately after a U.S. citizen passes away. Even when we make contact with friends or family members, they frequently do not know if the deceased U.S. citizen had a will. Make sure your will is stored in a safe, secure, and readily accessible location – such as filed with a law office – and that friends and family, especially the designated administrator, know where it is. You should give them an electronic copy and ensure they know to contact the U.S. Embassy. Time Now to Sit Back and Enjoy Thailand has long been a welcoming and gracious host to U.S. citizen retirees. We at the U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate are committed to serving your community and helping you to enjoy your well-earned retirement. We hope that you will take the time to ensure your final wishes are articulated and your loved ones are cared for afterwards. Peace of mind, after all, is the goal of the Third Chapter in Life. This article was drafted by the American Citizens Services unit of the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, part of an advice column for U.S. citizens permanently living in Thailand. For more information that could assist you in planning for your family’s future, please visit our website: https://th.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/death-of-a-u-s-citizen/. U.S. citizens resident in Thailand are subject to Thai law, including for issues related to bereavement. The U.S. Embassy cannot assist in drafting or witnessing a will. This is not professional legal advice. You may wish to consider contacting a legal service provider: https://th.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/local-resources-of-u-s-citizens/attorneys/. U.S. Embassy homepage: https://th.usembassy.gov/
  8. Mahidol University and CPF to develop liquid food for patients By The Nation Mahidol University Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital and Charoen Pokphand Foods (CPF) have signed a cooperation pact for "a food development project", for people who are ill and their caretakers. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084512-mahidol-university-and-cpf-to-develop-liquid-food-for-patients/
  9. Civil court cases now arranged, tracked online By Kesinee Taengkhieo The Nation Citizens can now file requests online for a Civil Court order to assign estate administrators and set court dates via a video call. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084510-civil-court-cases-now-arranged-tracked-online/
  10. Mahidol University and CPF to develop liquid food for patients By The Nation Mahidol University Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital and Charoen Pokphand Foods (CPF) have signed a cooperation pact for "a food development project", for people who are ill and their caretakers. In a press release issued on Friday, Professor Piyamitr Sritara, MD, Dean of Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, said: "The food development project is our innovation for society. We, together with CPF, set out to produce safe food for patients and offer convenience to patients and their relatives. “We have fed in-patients with our product and the patients satisfactorily gained strength. Under the cooperation, we will first launch Smart Soup-branded chicken soup with pumpkin and egg, which was the formula of Ramathibodi Hospital's nutrition department. The product will be available to anyone, for the benefits of ill persons and their caretakers." Driving the cooperation was constraints involved with the preparation of liquid food for the hospital's in-patients who need liquid food or tube feeding. The preparation process was time-consuming and the output could not meet demand. Meanwhile, "food with full nutrients for patients" is a key in quickly restoring patients' strengths. The university thus sought help from a private company which has capacity in producing safe food, and technology and innovation that can extend product life cycle. Both parties conducted a joint research to bring the project to life, which reduced the food preparation process for patients' greater convenience. Associate Professor Surasak Leela-Udomlipi, MD, Director of Ramathibodi Hospital, added that liquid food is generally imported. Aside from the high price, it comes in powder form which must be dissolved with water. In contrast, the chicken soup with pumpkin and egg that the hospital invented jointly with CPF contains all nutrients necessary for patients' recovery and costs at a much cheaper price. Convenience is also an attractive point, as the soup is ready to eat or load to the feeding tube, which reduces a chance of contamination to some extent. Another point is the hospital's liquid food has a life as short as 24 hours: it must be stored at 2-6 degrees Celsius at all time. CPF's innovation allows the storage at room temperature and the product can last 12 months. It cuts short the hospital's food preparation process. Meanwhile, patients and relatives can stock up the food without making frequent visits to the hospital. The soup will be first available at Ramathibodi Hospital's health shop and then at other hospitals of Mahidol University. Sukhawat Dansermsuk, CPF's Chief Executive Officer (CEO) for food business and Co-President, said that CPF is an internationally-recognised safe food producer. Its research team is capable of inventing health food to address the demand of all groups of consumers. CPF took pride in joining hands with Ramathibodi Hospital to develop products for patients, as this project is deemed a social product that benefits patients, their relatives, physicians and the public health as a whole. To produce good and safe food for society in a sustainable manner, CPF will utilise its advanced production technology in this project. For example, retort technology is applied to extend the soup's life cycle. Source: Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30364191 -- © Copyright The Nation 2019-02-15
  11. Civil court cases now arranged, tracked online By Kesinee Taengkhieo The Nation Citizens can now file requests online for a Civil Court order to assign estate administrators and set court dates via a video call. Court of Justice secretary-general Sarawut Benjakul said the service of convenience called the Electronic Filing for Appointment of Estate Administrator Motion, officially launched on Thursday, is part of the Thailand 4.0-inspired “D-Court” policy designed to digitise all court procedures by 2020. D-Court – implemented initially in Bangkok but soon to go national – is expected to provide good-standard services with faster links to information about ongoing cases, he said. Citizens should be able to determine the progress of cases involving political officeholders in three days instead of the customary 45 days. The service is available at www.civil.coj.go.th. Visitors fill in the information required on an electronic form, print out a court fee invoice to pay fines via a bank within three days, enter the payment slip in the system, choose a court date and confirm the motion submission. On the chosen date, the court session would be held via video call and the court would mail the order to the contact person. Full story: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30364188 -- © Copyright The Nation 2019-02-15
  12. Motorbike driver dies after his head crushed in Udon Thani, truck driver flees By The Thaiger A motorbike driver has died after his head was crushed by a truck and trailer yesterday. The trailer diver fled the scene in Udon Thani. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084507-motorbike-driver-dies-after-his-head-crushed-in-udon-thani-truck-driver-flees/
  13. Motorbike driver dies after his head crushed in Udon Thani, truck driver flees By The Thaiger A motorbike driver has died after his head was crushed by a truck and trailer yesterday. The trailer diver fled the scene in Udon Thani. The accident occurred in Kudjab Road in Mueang Udon Thani, North East of Thailand. Police and emergency responders arrived to find the body of Thai man, later identified as 39 years old Sutin Ngonchalee. Nearby they found his damaged motorbike. Full story: https://thethaiger.com/news/north-east/motorbike-driver-dies-after-his-head-crushed-in-udon-thani-truck-driver-flees -- © Copyright The Thaiger 2019-02-15
  14. Pollution improves, but Chiang Mai braced for more By The Nation Chiang Mai International Airport The haze situation in urban Chiang Mai had improved by Friday morning but remained hazardous enough in some areas that vulnerable groups – small children, the elderly and the infirm – were still being advised to wear facemasks while outdoors. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084490-pollution-improves-but-chiang-mai-braced-for-more/
  15. "Ya Dong" seller beats drunk customer to death for kicking his four year old Picture: Thai Rath Poh Teck Tung rescue foundation who were called to a "Ya Dong" (herbal liquor) stall in Bangkok found a 39 year old Surin man had been beaten to death. Full story: https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/1084489-ya-dong-seller-beats-drunk-customer-to-death-for-kicking-his-four-year-old/
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