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Hi from France

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  1. so your argument is that the internal market bill is just a bluff, like a big knife, and in fact reneging on a treaty had no impact because it's not effective yet? Based on data, not just posts without arguments or tabloid-based, please How do you think this "knife in the pocket" strategy turned out, JonnyF? I'm supposed you can comment on the fact that beside fishing and level playing field as a condition for accessing the EU market, there is now a third blocking point in negociations: what Barnier politely calls "governance". In other words, "how to enforce a d
  2. Get ready for Brexit they say.. https://news.sky.com/story/a-portable-cabin-and-google-translate-life-on-the-brexit-haulage-frontline-12143243
  3. ah I think I see what you mean : the IBM is just for laughs?
  4. Sorry I hope other posters can And for the other thing that you do not know about https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_Market_Bill
  5. By the way (and although negociations will still last years and years) Barnier was the single negociator for the EU, but the UK had successive chief negociators Let's rank them (EU point of view). David Davis was considered "a tourist" by the EU: the guy arrived with his hands in his pocket and thinking the UK had the upper hand. Very little was achieved under his watch and a lot of precious time was lost. Olly Robbins was the best: serious, competent. Led the british team like a trustworthy professional, got things done. Do not forget britain, is if not the
  6. Barnier is really top notch the most remarkable work he did was unite the 27 nations in this negociation. This is really a huge huge achievement. His weakness is he is close to retirement and would like to end his career with a sucess, maybe too much. So, some in the EU fear he is "too nice" with the UK. The risk is to strike a deal, which then would not be ratified by the UE parliament or would be blocked later... Frost using twitter to complain publicly he was "disappointed" was perceived in the EU as en un-diplomatic rookie mis
  7. My opinion on that is that this is completely false, and your adversarial vision of what a international negociation is is very, very far from reality. and if we move up the scale to Frost's boss : as far as BJ is concerned, he makes the job a middle-ranking diplomat negociating with a stronger party even harder....
  8. If anything Barnier as any top diplomat, is polite, more about Barnier more about Frost In other words, Frost is a very low-caliber diplomat in comparison, the best post he ever had was Ambassador to Denmark... Senior British diplomats (Alexandra Hall, Peter Ricketts, Kim Darroch, Richard Moore and of course Ivan Rogers) who are really up to par with Barnier and can negociate "Eye to Eye" have resigned or been fired. Believe me, you can make Frost a Baron and make him National Security Adviser, but that will
  9. Well its true this is not a negotiation between equals, but it won't be between equals when you deal with the USA or with China... even Mexico takes advantage of the position of weakness of the UK. And the Japan deal is crappy. I'm sure you realize the prominent place of the UK in the EU has been lost, now it is harder to negotiate internationally. And international negotiations of this kind worth billions and thousands of jobs are no joke. Now with a competent negotiating team and honest politicians at the helm, the UK could do much much better. You have neither : th
  10. I'm as often, quite impressed by the British parliament. I have shared here the work done by the commissions, which is also of very high quality. Is quite sad some posters here rely on Tabloid journalism with outrageous claims in capitals instead of the high quality work of their their own parliament.
  11. I'm not very knowledgable in matters related to the Commonwealth, but as I understand it, India's huge market would never be opened if immigration rules to the UK are not relaxed. "A few poles" triggered quite a huge "take back control" reaction, I not sure how acceptable millions of indians would be https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/jun/24/ease-migration-rules-for-indians-to-win-post-brexit-deals-say-mps
  12. You can't change the immediate future, and of course not the past, but YES things might have been different: right now a fringe of extreme brexiters have 100% power in the UK, the reality of public opinion the UK is much more balanced, with a majority now thinking brexit was a mistake in the first place. See image/video below In the long game the old brexiters retirees will die and simple demographics will bring the UK in close association with Europe again. I read an interesting term above: "rejoiners"
  13. You can't change the immediate future, and of course not the past, but YES things might have been different: right now a fringe of extreme brexiters have 100% power in the UK. In the long game, the old brexiters retirees will die and simple demographics will bring the UK in close association with Europe again. I read a new term reading this thread "rejoiners".
  14. The BoE said much more than this : not just long lasting, but bigger These are the cost estimates Another interesting indicator in the next months and years will be the Brexit + Covid-19 combo effect. Now you all probably know what Boris Johnson think about that : "<deleted> business"
  15. ... About these "unsatisfactory", conditions: after the test in Kent, there was another trial of post-Brexit checks https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/nov/24/trial-of-brexit-border-checks-causes-five-mile-lorry-queues-in-kent This is not even the fabled WTO system in action, but rather the "best case scenario of 70 seconds" and no checks yet on food, drink and agricultural products Get ready for the portaloos, and the Japanese factories selling to the EU will move the continent, even without the 10% t
  16. While this thread is obsessing about fish, (with English fishing licenses already sold anyway) there are mounting rumors Nissan will close Sunderland (and this is from the Torygraph, a brexiter newspaper) https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2020/11/24/nissan-dismisses-sunderland-plant-closure-rumours/ In other words there are bigger fish to fry ... And EU money is getting back to the EU https://www.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN28421B
  17. I disagree on why the UK blocked EU defense initiatives (not because it thought they would be inefficient, but because they feared they would be effective), we can probably agree the UK is now unable to block them. And that's what matters, whatever the reasons for blocking in the first place. For me that's even if NATO will remain the main military alliance in spite of its shortcomings (Turkey, A return of Trump in power in 4 years), the European defense spending payed by the EU citizens must be made in the UE and bring jobs to the EU, as well as make sur
  18. Trump style you say? Who is melodramatic here? And dont' start writing in capitals, please. .. and yes repeat : the UK is diverging strongly from the UE in defense matters the end of cooperation on Galileo is the most spectacular event, but by no means the only one. Granted the Lancaster House Treaties have not been canceled and NATO remains a UK priority, but EU-wise, I call this diverging. Maybe you can just take my arguments one by one and examine them (or maybe you just can't). .
  19. AFAIK the UK has refused to sign a defense agreement with the EU... And when the UK was a member, it blocked European defense initiatives for years and years. Now, I looked it up and the UK is still a major defense player even though it largely pulled out of the EU peacekeeping missions and left the European defense industry framework, the most remarquable move being leaving the Gallileo European Satellites program (and go for a Cummings - inspired moonshot) . The Galileo Security Monitoring Centre had to leave England for Madrid. https://www.instituteforgovernment.or
  20. AFAIK the UK has refused to sign a defense agreement with the EU... And when the UK was a member, it blocked European defense initiatives for years and years. Now, I looked it up and the UK is still a major defense player even though it largely pulled out of the EU peacekeeping missions and left the European defense industry framework, the most remarquable move being leaving the Gallileo European Satellites programme https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/explainers/future-relationship-defence-security-cooperation
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