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GinBoy2

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About GinBoy2

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    Bad Hombre
  • Birthday 02/10/1959

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    Rapid City/Khon Kaen

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  1. This a perplexing question, 'what if'. I just posted this graph over in the thread regarding Macron's comments. The mortality ratio is what you need to look at. I took US, France, Sweden and the UK. You can play with the data yourself and pull more countries. https://ourworldindata.org/mortality-risk-covid?country=USA~FRA~SWE~GBR
  2. Maybe I should have phrased it; 'Perplexed by the 'current' response!' Obviously looking back over time when mortality was in the ~15% range, yeah drastic measures had to be taken. But now, maybe 3-5%, are draconian measures really justified? And remember this is a ratio. Granted infections may be increasing in certain regions, but the mortality rate is still that 3-5% of those increasing infections, not the 15% of earlier in the spring
  3. So I'm getting increasingly confused by data. In no way am I underplaying how infectious the virus is, but what I am now questioning, is the chaos countries response to it is worth the economic devastation it's created. The WHO reports the actual death rate from seasonal flu versus COVID, is markedly different; Mortality for COVID-19 appears higher than for influenza, especially seasonal influenza. While the true mortality of COVID-19 will take some time to fully understand, the data we have so far indicate that the crude mortality ratio (the number of repor
  4. I'm still amazed at how much leniency they have allowed, almost open discussion about constitutional issues affected the institution. It does make me wonder if the elite/military may be re-addressing that fundamental tenant of how they retain power. That relationship has been a fundamental of the whole power structure for decades. But you would be an idiot not to recognize that the current institution doesn't quite provide the reverence that the previous one did They will do whatever it takes to hold on to power, so it'll be interesting to see who gets jettisoned, or wh
  5. Sometimes when I get depressed about the Trump reality TV show, I read a Brexit story. Never fails to lighten my mood about the nonsense in the US! LOL
  6. Thing is, the adulation doesn't come from the average Thai, who don't really like the Chinese. The adulation and pandering comes from that elite Sino Thai population, who actually see themselves as a different race to most Thai's. It's a strange country!
  7. Same with us, sold the rentals but kept the house for annual vacations. Like you this year is obviously a bust, and in truth we're probably not going to go back in 2021 either, since we want to wait until my wife gets US citizenship
  8. Best thing me and my wife ever did was selling up our rental condo's in Bangkok back in 2018. I'm not usually good at selling stock at the best time, but with the condo's pretty sure we got out just in time. Even before all the current chaos started we were worried about the over build in Bangkok. We did OK over the years with our rentals, but it certainly wouldn't be an investment I'd get into today
  9. Regardless of what you think or believe, just VOTE! Many of us have already voted so it's done, no point pontificating any more, just let the chips fall where they may.
  10. I must admit I'm totally amazed how openly they are discussing the 'issue' knowing full well the consequences of lese majeste. I hope this actually does, this time, result in real change and move Thailand past that Feudal roadblock in which it's been stuck for so long. My wife however is a lot more pessimistic, believing that the lock between the institution and the elite is such a strong self serving alliance it's almost impossible to break. I hope I'm right and she's wrong. But marriage teaches you that you are rarely right and your wife is nearly alw
  11. Which is the interesting, and rather remarkable thing in my eyes. The kids are actually talking about that unmentionable topic, which if you think about it, until that is addressed nothing will fundamentally change. That wave of discussion is being reported in overseas press which I'm sure terrifies the second tier of this house of cards. You can close your eyes to it, and we will never be able to openly discuss it on TVF, but it's the elephant in the room, which until someone puts a bullet to it, will haunt Thailand forever!
  12. I struggle with any extremist religious ideology, especially when they think killing is in the name of religion. Now I'll fess up I'm a pretty avid Catholic, so it's not like I'm anti religion. But this Islamic fanatical resurgence is like something from the middle ages of the Inquisition When will this ever end? In some ways it almost makes me question my own faith if this is what religion results in.
  13. Well thats another interesting point. Thai, compared to reading Mandarin, which I struggled with, is easy so long as you get tones, since unlike Mandarin, it is an alphabet, albeit a complex one. Thai has 44 consonant symbols, 16 vowel symbols which combine into at least 32 vowel forms and four tone diacritics This why in Issan they simply transliterate Lao using Thai script into how they hear the words
  14. In learning any tonal language its, Tones, Tones, Tones! Try not to be sucked into the idea that if you learn a word, without understanding the tone it will get you anywhere. I learned that lesson many years ago when I was learning Mandarin. If you don't 'get' the tones then even if you think you are pronouncing a word perfectly it may well be unintelligible. It's always hard for anyone who speaks a non tonal language to get it, since for us tones merely provide emphasis or emotion, whereas in a tonal language it provides meaning
  15. One of the issues, and I thought about this last night as we watched C3 news, was the fact that domestic TV is reporting the facts, but very little comment. Now I have been rather amazed I must say at some of the editorials in the Bangkok Post for one, which I never believed I would read in my lifetime. But compared to a report I saw on NBC news last night which gave a rather good analysis of the reasons behind the protests and underlying issues, that you are never probably see within Thailand. Well at least until there is true structural reform, and that I fear I
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