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Soi Dog Foundation expands canine sterilisation, vaccination programme

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Soi Dog Foundation expands canine sterilisation, vaccination programme

By The Nation

 

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KOH SAMUI: -- The Soi Dog Foundation on Friday started its canine sterilisation and vaccination programme in Koh Samui, Koh Tao and Koh Phangan to prevent further unwanted dogs being born, eliminate rabies, create a smaller, healthier and more sustainable population of dogs, and improve the environment for both animals and humans. 

 

The programme will target a minimum of 80 per cent of the dog population in the islands, estimated to be around 10,000 animals, and will take a minimum of nine months to complete. 

 

All funding will come directly from Soi Dog Foundation, which earlier this week mobilised a core team of two veterinarians, three vet nurses, four dog catchers and a manager. The team will target sterilising and vaccinating around 50 dogs per day, and will work systematically through each island, starting in Wat Bo Phuttharam in Samui. The Samui programme will take in seven districts and 39 villages

 

John Dalley, president and co-founder of Asia’s largest animal welfare organisation specialising in the welfare of street dogs and cats, said: “We had received a number of requests from people based in Samui over the years asking for us to conduct a mass sterilisation and vaccination programme there.

 

Up until now we simply did not have the resources to help out. Sterilisation and vaccination remains the only known sustainable and ethical way to reduce stray populations over time, and it is at the very heart of Soi Dog. Given time and resources, we intend to carry out such programmes right around Thailand, which is home to over 8 million street dogs alone. This alone indicates the nature of the challenge we are facing”.

 

Since Soi Dog Foundation started sterilising and vaccinating street dogs and cats in Phuket, back in 2003, the organisation has now achieved over 165,000 sterilisation operations, mainly in Phuket, Khao Lak, Phang Nga, and Bangkok. As a direct result of their work in Phuket, the island province is the only officially canine rabies-free province in the country. 

 

Earlier this year, Soi Dog embarked on the daunting task of sterilising and vaccinating in the Bangkok metropolitan area, home to over 640,000 free roaming dogs. Three mobile teams are currently operating in tandem, and will move systematically from khet to khet around the city until a minimum of 80 per cent of the strays have been sterilised.

 

Further teams will be added as resources become available. The target is to sterilise over 100,000 animals per year. The programme is expected to take between seven to 10 years to complete, and is being part-funded by Dogs Trust, the UK-based animal welfare charity.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30326133

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-09-08

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Good job and kill those that are sick and feeble (the dogs not the owners - although both options are tempting sometimes).

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Kudos to the Soi Dog Foundation!

 

This is a kind thing to do for all the animals that I see everyday. Further, it is action that can actually achieve concrete results with Samui being an island.

 

I'll be buying those people a cold Coke if/when I see them working on the roads. And if I see a donation box, I'll be putting my contribution in.

 

Well Done!

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Was able to sleep well at night because all of our animals were fixed.  We would also pay to have other neighborhood cats and dogs fixed as well.  Next time I am back in Thailand, will have have to stop by Soi Dog and make a donation.  

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Although this is admirable, I wonder whether this will ever make more than a temporary dent in the number of strays.

If 80% are sterilised, how long will it take the remaining 20% to fill the gap?

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Good Job !

Would just like to send them over to some TV members as well ...

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On Samui we have dog and cat rescue Samui .

They have been doing this continuously since 1999.

 

100% of dogs on our street is vaccinated and fixed already thanks to them.

 

 

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1 hour ago, loong said:

Although this is admirable, I wonder whether this will ever make more than a temporary dent in the number of strays.

If 80% are sterilised, how long will it take the remaining 20% to fill the gap?

 

I thought that your question was a good one, so I did a quick search on-line for an answer. Unfortunately, I did not find a clear answer regarding the effectiveness of these programs, and certainly no specific numbers/data.

 

In the various articles that I read, there are three items which seem to be needed for an effective program:

  • Catch/sterilize/release
  • Control of food supply (garbage)
  • Public education

I am not really sure what to say about these three items.

 

If they manage to achieve the 80% target (especially in females), then there should be a noticeable difference in a relatively short time. And logically, it will take a while to "fill the gap" again. Further, we are on an island, so the physical barrier will make this kind of thing much more effective; one article noted that some programs failed because (dogs especially) will roam far to find a bitch in heat.

 

Food supply/garbage. What can I say? We all see loads of garbage on the island, so I think there will be an adequate food supply for a long time. Perhaps if they fix the bloody incinerator sometime, that will help!

 

Public education. Again, what can I say? I think some Thais would be happy to have their pets spayed, but aren't willing to spend the money to do so. And, some don't seem to care if their pets get knocked up. Public attitudes will be hard to change.

 

In spite of the above, I think this is a great program and needs to be done, even if there will need to be a return visit by the Soi Dog Foundation in a few years. We humans helped to create this situation, and we have a responsibility to help fix/mitigate it. 

 

Any members knowledgeable about these kinds of programs? Or any members better at finding answers on-line?

 

Cheers

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They should come to Pattaya and expand their services to include taxi drivers, ladyboy thieves, and beach vendors.

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Not this nonsense again, these people are not helping the situation. While they might stop a few hundred mating, a few million more are shelling out puppies daily. It's like trying to stop a flooding boat from sinking by using a spoon to bale out the water. Extermination on a massive scale is what is needed to solve the problems these pests create.

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46 minutes ago, Orton Rd said:

Not this nonsense again, these people are not helping the situation. While they might stop a few hundred mating, a few million more are shelling out puppies daily. It's like trying to stop a flooding boat from sinking by using a spoon to bale out the water. Extermination on a massive scale is what is needed to solve the problems these pests create.

I suggest you read the article, and do some research on how 'extermination' doesn't work 

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4 hours ago, loong said:

Although this is admirable, I wonder whether this will ever make more than a temporary dent in the number of strays.

If 80% are sterilised, how long will it take the remaining 20% to fill the gap?

Between 3 & 5 years judging by the last time this kind of action was undertaken.

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I think they, and similar organisations (Koh Samui Animal Sanctuary etc.) do a great job! Years ago these "soi" dogs were a real pest, especially when in  packs, but the situation is now a lot better, especially in beach areas. I think it is mostly due to the  sterling work done by these organisations and every time I have a few baht loose change in my pocket, I put it in the "doggie box on the bar"!

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3 hours ago, Samui Bodoh said:

 

I thought that your question was a good one, so I did a quick search on-line for an answer. Unfortunately, I did not find a clear answer regarding the effectiveness of these programs, and certainly no specific numbers/data.

 

In the various articles that I read, there are three items which seem to be needed for an effective program:

  • Catch/sterilize/release
  • Control of food supply (garbage)
  • Public education

I am not really sure what to say about these three items.

 

If they manage to achieve the 80% target (especially in females), then there should be a noticeable difference in a relatively short time. And logically, it will take a while to "fill the gap" again. Further, we are on an island, so the physical barrier will make this kind of thing much more effective; one article noted that some programs failed because (dogs especially) will roam far to find a bitch in heat.

 

Food supply/garbage. What can I say? We all see loads of garbage on the island, so I think there will be an adequate food supply for a long time. Perhaps if they fix the bloody incinerator sometime, that will help!

 

Public education. Again, what can I say? I think some Thais would be happy to have their pets spayed, but aren't willing to spend the money to do so. And, some don't seem to care if their pets get knocked up. Public attitudes will be hard to change.

 

In spite of the above, I think this is a great program and needs to be done, even if there will need to be a return visit by the Soi Dog Foundation in a few years. We humans helped to create this situation, and we have a responsibility to help fix/mitigate it. 

 

Any members knowledgeable about these kinds of programs? Or any members better at finding answers on-line?

 

Cheers

Very good post, and may I suggest that you check out  "Koh Samui Animal Sanctuary" and "The  Dog Rescue Centre, Samui" They also do good work!

P.S. You are spot on about the incinerator!

 

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1 hour ago, sambum said:

P.S. You are spot on about the incinerator!

 

  Water content would be high so cheaper to bury them.

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