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BANGKOK 19 June 2019 18:34

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wanderluster

alcoholics - anyone else having problems trying to get semi sober

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14 minutes ago, jeab1980 said:

Time to leave this drivel now typical god fearing preachers getting there one and only lines in.

?? -- Man, did you eat some bad fish last night, or what ??

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1 hour ago, Neeranam said:

Rather convenient time as you avoid answering my questions.

 

As most know there are many reasons we can become "alcoholic" or at least behave like one. The AA movement has been a wonderful success around the world and saved many from destruction, it cannot be faulted. That having been said many members can be rather pedantic with "it's our way or no way."  My point is there are many reasons we start drinking out of control, one common reason is to forget and if we don't come to terms with the reason, the drinking won't stop, AA or not. In my case I had one damn good reason to forget and was set to kill myself with the stuff until my symptoms were recognized and I came to terms with the problem. This was all done without the aid of AA. I for one had been an AA member for years but the underlying reason was never addressed thus my eventual falling back into my old drinking pattern.

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10 minutes ago, PeCeDe said:

As most know there are many reasons we can become "alcoholic" or at least behave like one. The AA movement has been a wonderful success around the world and saved many from destruction, it cannot be faulted. That having been said many members can be rather pedantic with "it's our way or no way."  My point is there are many reasons we start drinking out of control, one common reason is to forget and if we don't come to terms with the reason, the drinking won't stop, AA or not. In my case I had one damn good reason to forget and was set to kill myself with the stuff until my symptoms were recognized and I came to terms with the problem. This was all done without the aid of AA. I for one had been an AA member for years but the underlying reason was never addressed thus my eventual falling back into my old drinking pattern.

 

How did you get sober & stay sober?

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Then they outlined the spiritual answer and program of action which a hundred of them had followed successfully. Though I had been only a nominal churchman, their proposals were not, intellectually, hard to swallow. But the program of action, though entirely sensible, was pretty drastic. It meant I would have to throw several lifelong conceptions out of the window. That was not easy. But the moment I made up my mind to go through with the process, I had the curious feeling that my alcoholic condition was relieved, as in fact it proved to be.
    Quite as important was the discovery that spiritual principles would solve all my problems. I have since been brought into a way of living infinitely more satisfying and, I hope, more useful than the life I lived before. My old manner of life was by no means a bad one, but I would not exchange its best moments for the worst I have now. I would not go back to it even if I could. A.A.'s

 

 

Twelve Steps are a group of principles, spiritual in their nature, which, if practiced as a way of life, can expel the obsession to drink and enable the sufferer to become happily and usefully whole.

 

These little studies of A.A. Twelve Steps now come to a close. We have been considering so many problems that it may appear that A.A. consists mainly of racking dilemmas and troubleshooting. To a certain extent, that is true. We have been talking about problems because we are problem people who have found a way up and out, and who wish to share our knowledge of that way with all who can use it. For it is only by accepting and solving our problems that we can begin to get right with ourselves and with the world about us, and with Him who presides over us all. Understanding is the key to right principles and attitudes, and right action is the key to good living; therefore the joy of good living is the theme of A.A. Twelfth Step.

 

For if an alcoholic failed to perfect and enlarge his spiritual life through work and self-sacrifice for others, he could not survive the certain trials and low spots ahead. It was the end of a perfect day, not a cloud on the horizon.

 

 

Daily Reflections October 7

Daily Reflections October 7 - LINK

 

Resentment is the number 1 offender.  And then there is 2 stepping, “ I am an Alcoholic and I can help you” Well what about all the steps in between?

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10 minutes ago, superglue said:

 

How did you get sober & stay sober?

Thanks for the question. Here's a brief recap. I was in the military (Vietnam) but after the war I moved to Canada in disgust over what had happened, then tried to forget. Which consciously I did, but of course you never forget hence my drinking. 30 years later I was in such a mess I had to go to the only person who would help, my sister in the UK. There I accidentally saw a retired British Military Doctor who asked if I'd ever been in the military to which I replied No. He then gave me a questionnaire to fill out, which I scored 100%. Bluntly he told me he thought I was lying. He enrolled me in a UK military PTSD group, that's when the memories started to flood back and after all the years of denial I felt free of the need because the cause had been dealt with.

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Just a quick note. What I went through is absolutely not for everyone and AA is a great place to start the process. If you think you have PTSD symptoms there's very good tests on the net. Since my diagnosis I've used lot's of VA resources to great effect, here's a great place to start, 

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/apps/decisionaid/how-can-this-help.aspx

 

I take an SRI religiously. I thank my version of God I found that UK Doctor, both he and my Sister saved my life. So there's always a first step and it has to be you that takes it.

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On 09/10/2017 at 12:56 PM, PeCeDe said:

As most know there are many reasons we can become "alcoholic" or at least behave like one. The AA movement has been a wonderful success around the world and saved many from destruction, it cannot be faulted. That having been said many members can be rather pedantic with "it's our way or no way."  My point is there are many reasons we start drinking out of control, one common reason is to forget and if we don't come to terms with the reason, the drinking won't stop, AA or not. In my case I had one damn good reason to forget and was set to kill myself with the stuff until my symptoms were recognized and I came to terms with the problem. This was all done without the aid of AA. I for one had been an AA member for years but the underlying reason was never addressed thus my eventual falling back into my old drinking pattern.

Sounds like a typical case of going to AA for the wrong reasons. Make sure you are an alcoholic, and not an alcohol abuser, there's a world of a difference.

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On 09/10/2017 at 1:27 PM, Wilson Smith said:

Resentment is the number 1 offender.  And then there is 2 stepping, “ I am an Alcoholic and I can help you” Well what about all the steps in between?

One alcoholic helps another to recover, having had a spiritual awakening, as a result of working all 12 steps. 

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