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madusa

True and Proper Buddhist teaching

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Rocky pretty much summed it up.
We are all governed by filters and external influences and Thailand has its share as all countries do.
All this even confused The Buddha until he reached a point of seeing it. Doh, the lights went on. Our paradigms change from within ( our view) and they are cemented in stone until they change again even if inaccurate again. They are the only logic until they change again. I would describe enlightenment partly as the realization and admission that these temporary and evolutionary views are usually inaccurate, subjective and filtering the truth.
555 now the amigdula.... that’s another interesting story.


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Hi
Good posts.
Actually Samatha is practiced by all sectors of Buddhist meditation practices.
Perhaps you meant Theravada?

As you said “be still” is the entry point where Samatha practice enables us to to see more clearly the intensity and power that our “monkey mind” imposes upon us.
That is meditative 101 and not easy to accomplish effectively.
With practice we see how while although seemingly powerful, they quickly fade and are replaced by yet another thought. In time most of these thoughts become paper tigers and their affects on us are diminished.




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Re vipassana

The Buddha was said to have practiced it and it was later brought back to us by Sri Goenka who is largely responsible for it thriving today.

Samatha is the 1st step to a successful vipassana experience.

 

I do believe the Tibetans focusing on Vajrayana practice have taken “practice” and “result of practice” to even higher levels.

 

Although Theravada remains the necessary root, vajrayana involves very different practices and the resulting “awareness”.

 

The Buddha tought about what he did and what he “realized”.

Perhaps some of the confusion stems from the fact that he varied his explanations based on the students’ capacity to understand. He did not teach what I would consider dogma.

 

 

 

 

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Re vipassana
The Buddha was said to have practiced it and it was later brought back to us by Sri Goenka who is largely responsible for it thriving today.
Samatha is the 1st step to a successful vipassana experience.
 
I do believe the Tibetans focusing on Vajrayana practice have taken “practice” and “result of practice” to even higher levels.
 
Although Theravada remains the necessary root, vajrayana involves very different practices and the resulting “awareness”.
 
The Buddha taught about what he did and what he “realized”.
Perhaps some of the confusion stems from the fact that he varied his explanations based on the students’ capacity to understand. He did not teach what I would consider dogma.
 
 
 
 
Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect
 




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Hi
Good posts.
Actually Samatha is practiced by all sectors of Buddhist meditation practices.
Perhaps you meant Theravada?

As you said “be still” is the entry point where Samatha practice enables us to to see more clearly the intensity and power that our “monkey mind” imposes upon us.
That is meditative 101 and not easy to accomplish effectively.
With practice we see how while although seemingly powerful, they quickly fade and are replaced by yet another thought. In time most of these thoughts become paper tigers and their affects on us are diminished.




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No I meant Samatha. Becoming still is not 101. It's 999. It's the most advanced practice possible. All the Jhanas unfold from that.
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Re vipassana
The Buddha was said to have practiced it and it was later brought back to us by Sri Goenka who is largely responsible for it thriving today.
Samatha is the 1st step to a successful vipassana experience.
 
I do believe the Tibetans focusing on Vajrayana practice have taken “practice” and “result of practice” to even higher levels.
 
Although Theravada remains the necessary root, vajrayana involves very different practices and the resulting “awareness”.
 
The Buddha tought about what he did and what he “realized”.
Perhaps some of the confusion stems from the fact that he varied his explanations based on the students’ capacity to understand. He did not teach what I would consider dogma.
 
 
 
 
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Buddhadasa Bhikkhu states in his book 'Handbook For Mankind' that the Buddha did not teach Vipasanna meditation, and that there is no mention of it in the Tipitaka.
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Vipassana has Hindu roots. Long before Buddha “awoke”. he was a Hindu after all and lived for many years as a Sadu.
I would venture that Vipassana ( I have only done Goenka 10 day) involves more “dogma” as it follows the precepts and their conduct rules. Samatha and insight meditation tend to discourage rules and “judgement” to tap deeper into our “Buddha nature” as a moral guide


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Vipassana has Hindu roots. Long before Buddha “awoke”. he was a Hindu after all and lived for many years as a Sadu.

I would venture that Vipassana ( I have only done Goenka 10 day) involves more “dogma” as it follows the precepts and their conduct rules. Samatha and insight meditation tend to discourage rules and “judgement” to tap deeper into our “Buddha nature” as a moral guide

 

 

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What I wanted to add is that you cannot actually practice vipassana in the same way that you cannot practice success. Vipassana is the result of connecting with and becoming established in awareness.

 

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