Jump to content

True and Proper Buddhist teaching


Recommended Posts

I guess Buddhism is only a path like any other that one can choose to follow or not.
Hiding behind any theology does not excuse inhumane action.
We do live in a relative world where others may or may not share our sense of right or wrong. In fact under certain circumstances we all can stray, hence the term regret.
Unfortunately it is hard to fight guns with only prayer.

Coincidently I am writing this at Bodhgaya and one hour ago I was sitting under the Bodhi tree at the
Mahabodhi Temple.
Was crowded but peaceful.



Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect




Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • Replies 154
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

At a high level, the main reason why correct Buddhism isn't being practiced by the general Thai population is that all Beings, bound in the state of Samsara, are afflicted by the three poisons.  

I believe that the true and proper Buddhism is not being practiced in Thailand. I wonder why the Sangha(the highest authority on Buddhism in Thailand)  is not doing anything to change the situation.

There is Thai Buddism and Thai ancestor worship, feudal system, superstition, Idolatry, class system and everything in between. Its not so much the non-practice of Buddhism, but the practice of the ot

Posted Images

Most religions have their exoteric versions for the common man and their esoteric versions for their initiates, and there are reasons for it. Often things are said said using analogies so that two people at different levels will see a different meaning. Thailand has its own version of Buddhism and as most know it also involves animism and other modifications.

 

It is indeed ironic watching those praying at temples for material acquisition, something completely contrary to Buddhism. Even in Tibet there are many sects and views, in fact sexual tantras are often practiced, and endorsed by surprising people, hardly something most would associate with pure Buddhism. The ideas behind Buddhism have been around for a long time, even before Gautama Buddha.

 

Regardless, Thais at least are closer to the truth than those that practice many other religions. Nirvana of course is not an easy path, however each positive step we take in any life moves us closer to that ideal. Nirvana is not necessarily the end end of the journey, some do choose to renounce it for later.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...

Is it OK to kill to protect Buddhism?

 

What an interesting question.

 

I think Buddhism only has 5 precepts and one of them is not killing. As far as I know there is no precepts on the importance of protecting Buddhism by killing people.

 

Buddhism is just a body of knowledge. Very useful and valuable knowledge but just a body of knowledge.

 

What is there to protect? Buddhism doesn't even exist according to Science. According to Science for something to exist it much have energy or contain matter. Buddhism has neither and but by that definition Science also doesn't exist as Science too has no energy and contain no matter. Anyway energy also cannot be created or destroyed but can just change from one form to another.

 

Buddhism is knowledge like the knowledge of gravity. If all the books on gravity is lost, one day someone sitting under a tree and an apple will drop on his head and he will go Ahh lets call that gravity.

 

So if all the temples and books on Buddhism was destroyed all knowledge lost, one day someone sitting under a tree and going into meditation will go wow that meditation has something to it. 

 

And if his name is John Smith or Joe Bloggs that we will have a new body of knowledge called Smithism or Bloggism.

 

Anyway Buddhism has something to do with less ego and I guess the ultimate act of the ego is to kill someone. And the ultimate act of less ego is to give your life to save someone else. 

 

So killing someone seems to me couldn't be more opposite to Buddhism as Buddhism is like loving kindness or something like that.

 

Its like someone eating only meat and telling everyone they are vegetarian.

 

It really couldn't be more opposite.

 

😀

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess as Buddhism and killing is so opposite there must numerous funny examples.

 

I think Buddhism believe in rebirth so what good is killing anyone?

 

They will just get reborn and come back again.

 

What a waste of effort. Instead of preaching all that killing they should try some of that meditating stuff.

 

😀

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Laza 45 said:

...The Sangha is the Buddhist community.. not the highest authority..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sangha

 

You can attach to the literal meaning of the word "Sangha", or you can have awareness of those in power.

 

I suspect the meaning of the word "Sangha" and the reality of how the "Sangha" functions in the world are not synonymous.

 

It's not like the Buddhist community (all of them) have regular meetings where they discuss and vote on issues.

 

That leaves those at the top of the hierarchy who end up calling the shots.

 

And, finally, is Buddism about democracy, or is it about awareness of what there is to be aware of???

Edited by rockyysdt
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rockyysdt said:

You can attach to the literal meaning of the word "Sangha", or you can have awareness of those in power.

 

I suspect the meaning of the word "Sangha" and the reality of how the "Sangha" functions in the world are not synonymous.

 

It's not like the Buddhist community (all of them) have regular meetings where they discuss and vote on issues.

 

That leaves those at the top of the hierarchy who end up calling the shots.

 

And, finally, is Buddism about democracy, or is it about awareness of what there is to be aware of???

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_Patriarch_of_Thailand

 

..Oh.. it is spelled Buddhism... 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

In my opinion the most difficult part of any spiritual practice is the inner work. The sincere prayer, and the hours spent in contemplation and meditation. 
 

Regardless of the religion, the masses are simply unwilling to devote themselves to this. And the Thais are particularly ill suited to contemplation and meditation, as it requires one to look within for the source of the problem and to introspect. 

 

So, it is far easier to simply practice exterior rituals, never do any of the far more important inner work, and convince yourself that you are a devout soul. That is what the vast majority of the world's so called religious people do. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, spidermike007 said:

In my opinion the most difficult part of any spiritual practice is the inner work. The sincere prayer, and the hours spent in contemplation and meditation. 
 

Regardless of the religion, the masses are simply unwilling to devote themselves to this. And the Thais are particularly ill suited to contemplation and meditation, as it requires one to look within for the source of the problem and to introspect. 

 

So, it is far easier to simply practice exterior rituals, never do any of the far more important inner work, and convince yourself that you are a devout soul. That is what the vast majority of the world's so called religious people do. 

I tend to agree. It's all a matter of personal priorities. If there's strong evidence that regular exercise will help you live longer and be healthier, why isn't everyone doing it? Probably because other activities, such as cooking meals, cleaning the house, watching one's favourite program on TV and movies, checking all one's emails regularly, and/or posts on Facebook and Twitter, and constantly answering messages on one's iPhone, are considered to be more important. No time for an hour's walk or a jog in the park every day.

 

Same applies to meditating, which is basically sitting down and doing nothing for a period of time, with iPhone switched off. 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are interested in Buddhism in Thailand a good place to start is with the history of SE Asia..  Thai Buddhism is a product of that history.  In ancient times a diverse animist culture prevailed and still does in some ethnic groups and some animist beliefs and practices survive in Thailand's Theravada Buddhism today.    Hinduism which began approximately 1500 BCE prevailed over virtually all of SE Asia and Indonesia from the 1st to 5th centuries CE. Buddhism is considered an offshoot of Hinduism developed by Ashoka (268 to 232 BCE) and entered SE Asia in the 1st 2nd and 3rd centuries CE.. While Hinduism prevailed during this period Buddhism gradually took over.  What is now Thailand was dominated by the Khmer empire which initially was Hindu.  In some Thai Wats you will still see representation of the Hindu deities such as Ganesh,Hanuman, Vishnu & Phra Mae Thorani ..the water goddess... amongst others. 

 

 'True and proper Buddhism' in Thailand  cannot be considered without consideration of this history.  It is not a tidy and easily defined and packaged commodity.  It is what it is and contains many aspects that someone with a purist illusion would find incompatible.   Much like Christianity really...

 

It is a very complicated history and my potted version here does not do it justice.  For anyone interested there are many links to be found with simple Google searches..  Here are a few that have interested me..

https://www.google.com/search?q=Ashaoka+when+did+he+live&rlz=1C1GGRV_enTH748TH748&oq=Ashaoka+when+did+he+live&aqs=chrome..69i57.6928j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_in_Southeast_Asia

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism_in_Southeast_Asia

 

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Laza 45 said:

If you are interested in Buddhism in Thailand a good place to start is with the history of SE Asia..  Thai Buddhism is a product of that history.  In ancient times a diverse animist culture prevailed and still does in some ethnic groups and some animist beliefs and practices survive in Thailand's Theravada Buddhism today.    Hinduism which began approximately 1500 BCE prevailed over virtually all of SE Asia and Indonesia from the 1st to 5th centuries CE. Buddhism is considered an offshoot of Hinduism developed by Ashoka (268 to 232 BCE) and entered SE Asia in the 1st 2nd and 3rd centuries CE.. While Hinduism prevailed during this period Buddhism gradually took over.  What is now Thailand was dominated by the Khmer empire which initially was Hindu.  In some Thai Wats you will still see representation of the Hindu deities such as Ganesh,Hanuman, Vishnu & Phra Mae Thorani ..the water goddess... amongst others. 

 

 'True and proper Buddhism' in Thailand  cannot be considered without consideration of this history.  It is not a tidy and easily defined and packaged commodity.  It is what it is and contains many aspects that someone with a purist illusion would find incompatible.   Much like Christianity really...

 

It is a very complicated history and my potted version here does not do it justice.  For anyone interested there are many links to be found with simple Google searches..  Here are a few that have interested me..

https://www.google.com/search?q=Ashaoka+when+did+he+live&rlz=1C1GGRV_enTH748TH748&oq=Ashaoka+when+did+he+live&aqs=chrome..69i57.6928j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism_in_Southeast_Asia

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism_in_Southeast_Asia

 

 

 

All that is fine and accurate, but it does not answer why the vast majority of the Thai people completely reject the core of Buddha's teaching, when they totally refuse to engage in contemplation, meditation, introspection, self analysis, penance, modesty, and anything more than rote and very brief prayer.

Edited by spidermike007
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, spidermike007 said:

All that is fine and accurate, but it does not answer why the vast majority of the Thai people completely reject the core of Buddha's teaching, when they totally refuse to engage in contemplation, meditation, introspection, self analysis, penance, modesty, and anything more than rote and very brief prayer.

 

My thoughts are that it's quite clear why the majority of Thai people (and indeed all people), completely reject the core of Buddha's teaching, when they totally refuse to engage in contemplation, meditation, introspection, self analysis, penance, modesty, and anything more than rote and very brief prayer.

 

It relates to expending effort and altering ones life habits and beliefs.

 

"Habits" are like approaching the event horizon of a black hole.

It's extremely difficult to overcome the pull towards ones acquired habits and beliefs.

Some psychologists are saying that one's habits remain with us for life and the only known way of breaking from them is by creating new habits which are stronger.

 

The three afflictions are Greed, Aversion, & Delusion.

So, with Thais (as with us all), it will be one or all of these.

 

 

Edited by rockyysdt
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

 

My thoughts are that it's quite clear why the majority of Thai people (and indeed all people), completely reject the core of Buddha's teaching, when they totally refuse to engage in contemplation, meditation, introspection, self analysis, penance, modesty, and anything more than rote and very brief prayer.

 

It relates to expending effort and altering ones life habits and beliefs.

 

"Habits" are like approaching the event horizon of a black hole.

It's extremely difficult to overcome the pull towards ones acquired habits and beliefs.

Some psychologists are saying that one's habits remain with us for life and the only known way of breaking from them is by creating new habits which are stronger.

 

The three afflictions are Greed, Aversion, & Delusion.

So, with Thais (as with us all), it will be one or all of these.

 

 

Good point. And good habits could be referred to as discipline. Alot of people are somewhat revolted by the idea of maintaining personal discipline within their own lives.  Those same people rail against others who are not behaving as they think they should. But, to look within? To take responsibility? Heaven forbid. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The most admirable quality of Buddhism that I've noted is its lack of the overbearing dogmatism that dominates the religions of the West. 

I would not arrogate to myself the authority to tell others how they should relate to and practice Buddhism. That path leads to the madness of inquisitions, mass forced conversions on pain of death, and organizations such as the Taliban, al Qaeda and ISIS. 

Buddhism is almost always merged with local cultures, customs and mores. 

Why would I force my idea of Buddhism upon those who think and believe differently than I do?

Isn't the whole idea behind Buddhism a leaving of attachment. Yet, now we advocate for an attaching to dogma and ideology. 

I feel the same way about those who rail against Buddhist tattooes and the like. The "Buddha is not your ornament." mentality.

I call these folks The Budiban. They would persecute those who disagree with them. The whole idea is anathema to everything that I've read about the Buddha, Buddhism and the Way.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...