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True and Proper Buddhist teaching

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20 hours ago, jamesc2000 said:

How do we know if what we do and say is motivated by ego?

 

If we see people not practising true Buddhism and we say he is not practising true Buddhism and we shake our heads and she is not practising true Buddhism and we shake our heads

 

and think only I practice true Buddhism is that words and action motivated by ego?

 

No danger of that from me. I know so little about Buddhism I cannot say this is true Buddhism and that is not so true Buddhism.

 

😀

 

Surely if we feel only we practice true Buddhism and others do not, that must be ego.

 

Ego creates separation and superiority and feelings of smugness.

 

If there is I and others there must be ego involved.

 

I was thinking hard how to diminish ego and I thought anything that makes us feel annoyed, angry, slightly miffed must be due to ego.

 

If there is no ego there is nothing to break our equanimity.   

 

I guess being happy and cheerful is the best antidote to ego.

 

Basically our Ego is a construct.

 

It is our personality and it's who we think we are.

A personality can have good, neutral and bad attributes, but is essentially impermanent.

Most anchor themselves on this ego which has no foundation.

 

One of the benefits of daily Mindfulness is to observe ones ego and the tricks it plays, to observe ones ego impartially/neutrally.

Eventually with practice there'll be 2 James, the Ego, and that which observes the ego.

Over time, that which observes the ego will grow in strength while that which is being observed will dimish.

 

One of the benefits of Sitting Meditation is that when one slips into "consciousness without thought" (this initially can be a shallow state and can deepen), one begins to experience an egoless state. 

 

The reason why I suggested you observe yourself, apart from beginning an important piece of Buddhist practice, is to gauge what your ego is up to.

 

For example, things such as, "why does your ego post"?

 

Understanding your ego's motives will be an indicator of how far your ego will allow you to go with worthwhile practice.

 

 

Edited by rockyysdt
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"I want to be enlightened."

 

"I want to achieve nirvana."

 

"I want to give up women and alcohol."

 

"I want to read up all the sutras."

 

"I want to redouble my efforts."

 

So many "I"s but cannot see.

 

😀

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3 hours ago, rockyysdt said:

 

Basically our Ego is a construct.

 

It is our personality and it's who we think we are.

A personality can have good, neutral and bad attributes, but is essentially impermanent.

Most anchor themselves on this ego which has no foundation.

 

One of the benefits of daily Mindfulness is to observe ones ego and the tricks it plays, to observe ones ego impartially/neutrally.

Eventually with practice there'll be 2 James, the Ego, and that which observes the ego.

Over time, that which observes the ego will grow in strength while that which is being observed will dimish.

 

One of the benefits of Sitting Meditation is that when one slips into "consciousness without thought" (this initially can be a shallow state and can deepen), one begins to experience an egoless state. 

 

The reason why I suggested you observe yourself, apart from beginning an important piece of Buddhist practice, is to gauge what your ego is up to.

 

For example, things such as, "why does your ego post"?

 

Understanding your ego's motives will be an indicator of how far your ego will allow you to go with worthwhile practice.

 

 

Thank you very much for your question.

 

The answer is not me, not mine, not I.

 

"why does your ego post"? Its not my mine.

 

your ego's motives - its not mine.

 

how far your ego will allow you to go - There is no me to go any where.

 

I am not sure why you rather talk about me that do not exist and not a subject like Buddhism which is so much more interesting.

 

But feel free to ask anything else you like.

 

I worry that you might not like my answers and I am sure this is not the case.

 

But if you really do not like "my" answers then you have to ask who is the "you" that is doing the not liking.

 

Today I saw a cute dog and I said to myself cute dog and then I ask myself is there such a thing as an ugly dog?

 

And my reply was if there is no ego there is no ugly.

 

If there is no ego there is no food I like or food I don't like, its all good.

 

No ego no beautiful or ugly people they are all people.

 

No ego means we can never be annoyed by another person's post.

 

The bigger the ego the more annoyance.

 

A post that is infuriating that must be a really big ego.

 

😀

 

The credit is yours as without your posts I would not have learned so much. 

 

Thank you very much.

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19 hours ago, jamesc2000 said:

"I want to be enlightened."

 

"I want to achieve nirvana."

 

"I want to give up women and alcohol."

 

"I want to read up all the sutras."

 

"I want to redouble my efforts."

 

So many "I"s but cannot see.

 

😀

You've got an uphill battle on your hands.

Changing ones habits can be close to impossible, particularly as you age.

 

I liken it to the pull of gravity as you approach the event horizon of a Black Hole, such is the pull of habit/conditioning.

 

Studying Buddhism has its positives.

The trap is that you can spend years learning doctrine (which can be debatable).

You can end up becoming an expert, but be light on with practice.

There are many Buddhist experts who can quote the Sutta's but remain anchored in Samsara.

 

If you're keen to get going and don't want to waste time, I recommend you learn the core practices and then schedule daily practice.

 

1. Read about Buddhism and get involved with discussion, forum or otherwise.

This will encourage you and give you reason to continue.

Here is a good resource:

https://www.dharmaseed.org/

 

 

2. Practice Sitting Meditation daily.  

   I recommend practicing Anapanasiti which includes the 16 steps to Awakening.

   Two excellent guides by Ajahn Buddhadasa (he was a serious follower of the Buddha)

 

    a.  Anapanasiti (Mindfulness of Breathing) by Buddhadasa Bikkhu

    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/anapanasati.pdf

 

     b.  Anapanasiti (Mindfulness with Breathing) by Buddhadasa Bikkhu  (for serious beginners)

     https://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikkhu_Buddhadasa_Anapanasati_Mindfulness_with_Breathing.htm#

 

3. Introduce Daily Mindfulness practice.

     Basically create a neutral Observer (positioned roughly towards the rear top of your head).

     From when you awake, until when you fall asleep, the end game is to have the Observer constantly observing you.

     Concentration may last only a few seconds, but over time you can develop Mindfulness, for longer and longer periods.

     Observe, ones breath, ones body, ones thoughts, ones feelings, and the world around one.

     I recommend  Mindfulness in Plain English  Bhante Henepola Gunaratana

    

4. Attend Meditation Groups and/or Retreats.

For your vacation try to attend a live in retreat.

This will give you the feel of the task ahead of you and how strong a hold your ego has with your life.

 

If you live in Thailand a good retreat catering for Westerners is Wat Suan Mokkh.

10 day retreats beginning on the first day of each month.

Here you will live life in silence with sitting and walking meditation, concrete bed with wooden pillow, no internet contact, vow of silence and celibacy, and towards the end, one meal a day.      https://suanmokkh-idh.org/

 

 

My focus for you revolves around "practice".

Without "practice" everything is just academic, or ego massaging.

 

If you practice on your own initially, then look for literature which focuses on posture or the sitting position.

In my opinion, getting your sitting correct can be half the battle towards successful meditation.

Full lotus can be extremely difficult for Westerners and counter productive.

There is much opinion and controversy over the correct way to sit, but if you're getting on in years I find nothing wrong with a low back chair, but you may explore other things such as a zafu cushion, meditation stool or other. I also recommend contacting a rubber supplier to buy furniture grade foam with which to create a sitting area, a flat 1.6metre square area to protect your legs, knees and ankles, and a raised section for your bottom.

I recommend:   Will Johnson  The Posture of Meditation.

 

My main recommendation is, not to become a Buddhist expert, but to expertly develop your skills of practice.

Doing rather than thinking is the way.  🙂

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4 hours ago, rockyysdt said:

You've got an uphill battle on your hands.

Changing ones habits can be close to impossible, particularly as you age.

 

I liken it to the pull of gravity as you approach the event horizon of a Black Hole, such is the pull of habit/conditioning.

 

Studying Buddhism has its positives.

The trap is that you can spend years learning doctrine (which can be debatable).

You can end up becoming an expert, but be light on with practice.

There are many Buddhist experts who can quote the Sutta's but remain anchored in Samsara.

 

If you're keen to get going and don't want to waste time, I recommend you learn the core practices and then schedule daily practice.

 

1. Read about Buddhism and get involved with discussion, forum or otherwise.

This will encourage you and give you reason to continue.

Here is a good resource:

https://www.dharmaseed.org/

 

 

2. Practice Sitting Meditation daily.  

   I recommend practicing Anapanasiti which includes the 16 steps to Awakening.

   Two excellent guides by Ajahn Buddhadasa (he was a serious follower of the Buddha)

 

    a.  Anapanasiti (Mindfulness of Breathing) by Buddhadasa Bikkhu

    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/anapanasati.pdf

 

     b.  Anapanasiti (Mindfulness with Breathing) by Buddhadasa Bikkhu  (for serious beginners)

     https://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikkhu_Buddhadasa_Anapanasati_Mindfulness_with_Breathing.htm#

 

3. Introduce Daily Mindfulness practice.

     Basically create a neutral Observer (positioned roughly towards the rear top of your head).

     From when you awake, until when you fall asleep, the end game is to have the Observer constantly observing you.

     Concentration may last only a few seconds, but over time you can develop Mindfulness, for longer and longer periods.

     Observe, ones breath, ones body, ones thoughts, ones feelings, and the world around one.

     I recommend  Mindfulness in Plain English  Bhante Henepola Gunaratana

    

4. Attend Meditation Groups and/or Retreats.

For your vacation try to attend a live in retreat.

This will give you the feel of the task ahead of you and how strong a hold your ego has with your life.

 

If you live in Thailand a good retreat catering for Westerners is Wat Suan Mokkh.

10 day retreats beginning on the first day of each month.

Here you will live life in silence with sitting and walking meditation, concrete bed with wooden pillow, no internet contact, vow of silence and celibacy, and towards the end, one meal a day.      https://suanmokkh-idh.org/

 

 

My focus for you revolves around "practice".

Without "practice" everything is just academic, or ego massaging.

 

If you practice on your own initially, then look for literature which focuses on posture or the sitting position.

In my opinion, getting your sitting correct can be half the battle towards successful meditation.

Full lotus can be extremely difficult for Westerners and counter productive.

There is much opinion and controversy over the correct way to sit, but if you're getting on in years I find nothing wrong with a low back chair, but you may explore other things such as a zafu cushion, meditation stool or other. I also recommend contacting a rubber supplier to buy furniture grade foam with which to create a sitting area, a flat 1.6metre square area to protect your legs, knees and ankles, and a raised section for your bottom.

I recommend:   Will Johnson  The Posture of Meditation.

 

My main recommendation is, not to become a Buddhist expert, but to expertly develop your skills of practice.

Doing rather than thinking is the way.  🙂

You are absolutely right.

 

If anyone said what's below then they would have an uphill battle.

"I want to be enlightened."

"I want to achieve nirvana."

"I want to give up women and alcohol."

"I want to read up all the sutras."

"I want to redouble my efforts."

So many "I"s but cannot see.

 

The reason its in " " is precisely its not me saying it. 

 

There is no me to fight any battles. If there is no ego there is no battles, there is no winning. Who wins?

 

Anyway up hill, down hill if no ego no difference. Do you think down hill is good and up hill is bad? Its the ego that says one is good and one is bad and the ego wants the down hill and dislikes the up hill.

 

If you always want to win and never want to lose its only because of ego.

 

If no ego winning and losing is the same and either wouldn't bother you. If you feel good about winning and bad about losing is because of ego.

 

You really give me too much credit. I have no aim to be a Buddhist expert.

I never read the sutra or any other holy books and no intention to. 

That would be like riding an ox and looking for one.

 

😀

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If we only like the people that practice

 

and we only like people that don't drink alcohol, don't womanise and don't eat lots of fatty food

 

and only like people that get their sitting position correct.

 

Then how can you open your heart to people that never practice

 

and drink lots of alcohol and womanise and eat lots of fatty food

 

and worse of the worse don't have a correct sitting position?

 

😀

 

Its the ego that splits up people that we think is on the correct path and people on the wrong path.

 

If there is no ego there is no difference to how we see them.

 

If there is no ego spaghetti and custard taste wonderful.

 

Its all good. 

Edited by jamesc2000

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18 hours ago, rockyysdt said:

You've got an uphill battle on your hands.

Changing ones habits can be close to impossible, particularly as you age.

 

I liken it to the pull of gravity as you approach the event horizon of a Black Hole, such is the pull of habit/conditioning.

 

Studying Buddhism has its positives.

The trap is that you can spend years learning doctrine (which can be debatable).

You can end up becoming an expert, but be light on with practice.

There are many Buddhist experts who can quote the Sutta's but remain anchored in Samsara.

 

If you're keen to get going and don't want to waste time, I recommend you learn the core practices and then schedule daily practice.

 

1. Read about Buddhism and get involved with discussion, forum or otherwise.

This will encourage you and give you reason to continue.

Here is a good resource:

https://www.dharmaseed.org/

 

 

2. Practice Sitting Meditation daily.  

   I recommend practicing Anapanasiti which includes the 16 steps to Awakening.

   Two excellent guides by Ajahn Buddhadasa (he was a serious follower of the Buddha)

 

    a.  Anapanasiti (Mindfulness of Breathing) by Buddhadasa Bikkhu

    http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/anapanasati.pdf

 

     b.  Anapanasiti (Mindfulness with Breathing) by Buddhadasa Bikkhu  (for serious beginners)

     https://www.dhammatalks.net/Books3/Bhikkhu_Buddhadasa_Anapanasati_Mindfulness_with_Breathing.htm#

 

3. Introduce Daily Mindfulness practice.

     Basically create a neutral Observer (positioned roughly towards the rear top of your head).

     From when you awake, until when you fall asleep, the end game is to have the Observer constantly observing you.

     Concentration may last only a few seconds, but over time you can develop Mindfulness, for longer and longer periods.

     Observe, ones breath, ones body, ones thoughts, ones feelings, and the world around one.

     I recommend  Mindfulness in Plain English  Bhante Henepola Gunaratana

    

4. Attend Meditation Groups and/or Retreats.

For your vacation try to attend a live in retreat.

This will give you the feel of the task ahead of you and how strong a hold your ego has with your life.

 

If you live in Thailand a good retreat catering for Westerners is Wat Suan Mokkh.

10 day retreats beginning on the first day of each month.

Here you will live life in silence with sitting and walking meditation, concrete bed with wooden pillow, no internet contact, vow of silence and celibacy, and towards the end, one meal a day.      https://suanmokkh-idh.org/

 

 

My focus for you revolves around "practice".

Without "practice" everything is just academic, or ego massaging.

 

If you practice on your own initially, then look for literature which focuses on posture or the sitting position.

In my opinion, getting your sitting correct can be half the battle towards successful meditation.

Full lotus can be extremely difficult for Westerners and counter productive.

There is much opinion and controversy over the correct way to sit, but if you're getting on in years I find nothing wrong with a low back chair, but you may explore other things such as a zafu cushion, meditation stool or other. I also recommend contacting a rubber supplier to buy furniture grade foam with which to create a sitting area, a flat 1.6metre square area to protect your legs, knees and ankles, and a raised section for your bottom.

I recommend:   Will Johnson  The Posture of Meditation.

 

My main recommendation is, not to become a Buddhist expert, but to expertly develop your skills of practice.

Doing rather than thinking is the way.  🙂

So are you saying sitting meditation is the only way?

 

If you cannot do it, you are screwed or remain anchored in Samsara in this life and every life after that forever and ever and ever?

 

Is there no alternative, is there no other path, is this the one and only way?

 

😀

 

If its the only way then I am screwed, Sammy boy I am with you all the way, let join to each other at the waist cos I am never going to leave you.

 

Not that I don't want to its just there is only one path and its the path not everyone can take.

 

Of course there are other paths if there wasn't I would be happily writing this post.

 

I would be getting to know Sara better as we will be together for a very long time, a very very long time.

 

If you have to be stuck to someone might as well get to know them and get along better.

 

Now I don't believe we will all get stuck in Samara forever and ever I think the opposite, karma keep presenting us with learning opportunities to see things as it really is.

 

To see ourselves as we really are and to know not only who we are but more precisely what we are.

 

If we can see things as they really are then its bye bye Samsara. I am leaving you and I ani't never coming back.

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18 hours ago, jamesc2000 said:

So are you saying sitting meditation is the only way?

 

If you cannot do it, you are screwed or remain anchored in Samsara in this life and every life after that forever and ever and ever?

 

Is there no alternative, is there no other path, is this the one and only way?

 

😀

 

If its the only way then I am screwed, Sammy boy I am with you all the way, let join to each other at the waist cos I am never going to leave you.

 

Not that I don't want to its just there is only one path and its the path not everyone can take.

 

Of course there are other paths if there wasn't I would be happily writing this post.

 

I would be getting to know Sara better as we will be together for a very long time, a very very long time.

 

If you have to be stuck to someone might as well get to know them and get along better.

 

Now I don't believe we will all get stuck in Samara forever and ever I think the opposite, karma keep presenting us with learning opportunities to see things as it really is.

 

To see ourselves as we really are and to know not only who we are but more precisely what we are.

 

If we can see things as they really are then its bye bye Samsara. I am leaving you and I ani't never coming back.

 

You are looking at it in the wrong way.

 

The initial retreat where you are isolated is only a kick start.

 

Perfecting your practice may take years.

 

Obviously Mindfulness allows you to interact, so you can continue your loving kindness.

 

Sitting Meditation might begin once or twice a day for 30 minutes and develop from there.

The aim being to build on your concentration and proficiency.

 

What happens from there will develop of its own accord.

If you are travelling well you will find yourself meditating for longer periods.

 

The Buddha developed Monkhood because he knew practice leading to Awakening for most is a full time job.

 

So, don't worry.

There is much time for loving kindness in the initial part of your journey.

The other side of opening your heart is that once Awakened you can teach others with their journey.

What better way to demonstrate open heart than by practically assisting others.

 

It seems your ego is lazy and wants the pot of gold through nothing more than empathy and good will to others.

 

Yes, you are screwed, and further, although eventually you may expend your kharma and get over the line, this will probably take just short of infinity number of lives.

 

 

The key thing here is the present.

 

You can only live in the present.

The past i history, learn from it but don't anchor yourself to it.

The future doesn't exist, but you can plan for the future.

 

Mindfulness and Meditation assists you to be truly in the present, and to allow you to be, and see.

 

Anything short of this and you will continue to wallow in your conditioned state.

Even your motives are self.

You want to save yourself, and the way you've planned to do this is to live with an open heart.

The true open heart person does this without reward.

Having an open heart for reward automatically closes the heart.

 

Sorry my friend, serious practice must be included in your quest, for without it you will lack awareness.

 

You must expend EFFORT.

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44 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

The future doesn't exist, but you can plan for the future.

I need to elaborate on this. 

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53 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

serious practice must be included in your quest, for without it you will lack awareness.

In the "Do you believe in God" topic there is one poster claiming that the only way to find happiness and serenety is by medidating.

 

That is opinion about the matter has more value because he is practising daily and thus know about what he is speaking. 

 

At 71+ I am happy and serene by accepting things as they are, not trying to find an explanation for everything, enjoying the terrestrial pleasure. 

 

It seems for him that this can not be the right way. 

 

Are there not different paths to reach a goal? 

Or;

Are there "higways" and "secondary ways" to reach the goal? 

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21 minutes ago, luckyluke said:

In the "Do you believe in God" topic there is one poster claiming that the only way to find happiness and serenety is by medidating.

 

That is opinion about the matter has more value because he is practising daily and thus know about what he is speaking. 

 

At 71+ I am happy and serene by accepting things as they are, not trying to find an explanation for everything, enjoying the terrestrial pleasure. 

 

It seems for him that this can not be the right way. 

 

Are there not different paths to reach a goal? 

Or;

Are there "higways" and "secondary ways" to reach the goal? 

The only way to ever know, or potentially ever know, is to practice on building ones awareness to know.

 

Mindfulness, and Meditation are simply tools with which one facilitates awareness.

 

We all age and slowly deteriorate, some faster than others.

Unfortunately, we are all impermanent.

 

The body has a host of mechanisms and systems which are capable of retarding the aging process and getting the best out of what you've been given.

It isn't a coincidence than Monks eat only once a day.

In the West we eat ourselves to death.

Not only with processed products, but over consumption.

We can barely go 3 hours without consuming the rubbish we call food.

 

In nature we intermittently fasted, through circumstance.

If one practices intermittent fasting, consuming natural foods, regular exercise, mindfulness practice, and meditation one can turn things around.

Around from acceptance of ones plight towards discovering what always, that which we were always blind from.

 

The serenity you mention, does it come from surrendering to ones plight?

Or is there a true serenity waiting to be discovered?

 

 

Edited by rockyysdt

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5 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

The serenity you mention, does it come from surrendering to ones plight, or is there a true serenity waiting to be discovered?

Why is that important to know? 

It may be important for you, not necessarily for me. 

What is important for me is what I rescent, not how I rescent it. 

I will never claim that I rescent "more" "better" than someone else. 

It may be "different" perhaps, but how to know? 

I know what I rescent, not what another rescent. 

The poster on the other topic pretend he does. 

That's of course an opinion, and thus unmeasurable. 

It seems that there are more people believing their way is the only right way. 

I leave them in their belief to think so. 

However they seems a bit 

pretentious, even intolerant to me. 

But that's of course only an opinion, so no intrinsic value. 

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1 hour ago, luckyluke said:

Why is that important to know? 

It may be important for you, not necessarily for me. 

What is important for me is what I rescent, not how I rescent it. 

I will never claim that I rescent "more" "better" than someone else. 

It may be "different" perhaps, but how to know? 

I know what I rescent, not what another rescent. 

The poster on the other topic pretend he does. 

That's of course an opinion, and thus unmeasurable. 

It seems that there are more people believing their way is the only right way. 

I leave them in their belief to think so. 

However they seems a bit 

pretentious, even intolerant to me. 

But that's of course only an opinion, so no intrinsic value. 

No personal attack on you Lucky.

More a reflection of where I'm at and my attempts to make sense of this world.

In terms of age, we are both pretty close.

 

Why is that important to know? Its not so much that it's important to know, but more so it is there to experience.

If it's there waiting to experience, isn't this part of your unfulfilled potential?

 

Does the Buddhas teachings have validity?

Those un Awakened may never know.

For me, apart from killing time, and doing the same thing each day, only with different people and different locations offers no fulfilment.

We are dying in tiny steps.

 

But the state one can achieve whilst in deep meditation (timeless consciousness without thought), even for short periods has given me only a taste of our potential. A state that excels any state that I have had in my entire life.

 

By the way, what does "rescent" mean?

Edited by rockyysdt

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18 minutes ago, rockyysdt said:

for me, apart from killing time, and doing the same thing each day, only with different people and different locations offers no fulfilment.

We are dying in tiny steps.

 

But the state one can achieve whilst in deep meditation (timeless consciousness without thought), even for short periods has given me only a taste of our potential. A state that excels any state that I have had in my entire life.

 

By the way, what does "rescent" mean?

That's very fine for you, each of us is doing the best he think is for him, in a way which suit him the best.

 

The important thing being, although in my opinion,  is to do good as much as possible, and not bad intentionally. 

 

I am Belgian and  sometimes think in Flemish or French and than translate it.

 

"Rescent" is a wrong translation of the French word "ressentir", the right translation is "feeling/perceive".

 

 

 

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