Jump to content
BANGKOK

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

soidog2

Fruit fly sticky trap

Recommended Posts

I recently found this fruit fly bait spray.

We hang empty plastic bottles; spray coat them; watch the flies get caught.

Works really well, if you grow fruit or fleshy vegetables it will save you a ton of chemical use.

Pictures attached.

IMG_0162.JPG

IMG_0163.JPG

IMG_0164.JPG

IMG_0165.JPG

IMG_0166.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you really getting significant control and reducing fruit infestation, or are you just trapping a lot of fruit flies?

 

From my experience with a mango orchard and support/advise from a Mae Jo University pomology ajarn, plus part time management help from my neighbor who was orchard manager for one of the biggest mango farmers in Thailand: sticky and phermone traps are good for detecting level of pest activity and timing for other treatments like bagging and spraying. It appears that you are trapping a lot of flies, but in reality it is a drop in the bucket of the amount of flies around and in the trees. 

 

What is your experience? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, drtreelove said:

Are you really getting significant control and reducing fruit infestation, or are you just trapping a lot of fruit flies?

 

From my experience with a mango orchard and support/advise from a Mae Jo University pomology ajarn, plus part time management help from my neighbor who was orchard manager for one of the biggest mango farmers in Thailand: sticky and phermone traps are good for detecting level of pest activity and timing for other treatments like bagging and spraying. It appears that you are trapping a lot of flies, but in reality it is a drop in the bucket of the amount of flies around and in the trees. 

 

What is your experience? 

His toms look pretty good, must be having some effect?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, drtreelove said:

Are you really getting significant control and reducing fruit infestation, or are you just trapping a lot of fruit flies?

 

From my experience with a mango orchard and support/advise from a Mae Jo University pomology ajarn, plus part time management help from my neighbor who was orchard manager for one of the biggest mango farmers in Thailand: sticky and phermone traps are good for detecting level of pest activity and timing for other treatments like bagging and spraying. It appears that you are trapping a lot of flies, but in reality it is a drop in the bucket of the amount of flies around and in the trees. 

 

What is your experience? 

So far so good, but too early for conclusive results, I will post further results after 90 consecutive days.

 

Other people asked:

The spray is not cheap B 550.00per.

Recommended: 1 sticky trap per 1 square meter.

 

Best regards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, soidog2 said:

So far so good, but too early for conclusive results, I will post further results after 90 consecutive days.

 

But is this the only pest control you are employing and will the results reflect true effectiveness of the sticky traps?  Or do you still load them up with abamectin as you mentioned once? 

 

In my work with customers or in my own garden, it's hard for me to attribute success to any one modality,  because for example my last veggie garden in California, I started early soil preparation with soil testing and prescription amendments, double digging according to Grow Biointensive method, incorporating the prescribed soil minerals, copious compost, humate ore, Azomite and kelp meal.  Then when my makua, tomatoes and strawberries went in (known for susceptibility to soil borne pathogens) I soil drenched with biological fungicide every month. When the corn, pole beans, cannabis, and other plants started to grow, I foliar sprayed every two weeks with neem oil, pyrethrins and biofungicide/bactericide to prevent known pests and fungal disease. I trapped gophers.  I fertilized with hydrolyzed fish fertilizer and kelp solution.  I had a pest and disease free garden, (even the cannabis, which is a caterpillar, broad mite and botritus mold magnet).  But what can I attribute that to?  Not to one product or method, but to the entire, strictly organic, preventive approach, especially soil building that enhances resistance. 

 

BTW, the toughest pests to control were gophers; be glad you don't have those here in Thailand. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't have the time or the resources available to you.

In my experience, this is the first time ever that a non-chemical (in Thailand) shows promise against fruit fly infestations.

Baits are manageable for my home garden but not for the farm. (too cumbersome & expensive)

I put them in my tomatoes and chilies; in season now, cut all other treatments to give it a fair shot. Will see after one or two fruiting cycles.

 

 

 

IMG_0206.JPG

IMG_0207.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...