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Awa Shuen

Visit Srisaket next week!

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Plenty of computer stores in Thailand and routers.   Just don't advertise that you do work in Thailand even online.   There are work permit and tax issues.  I don't know all but I'm concerned about this for myself as you can be deported immediately.      It will be interesting to hear how you like your trip.    I think I enjoy up country more than BKK but I'm not sure about 1:15 mins from ubon ratchathani.  Or  major city.   

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4 hours ago, Awa Shuen said:

 

Thanks Elkski your concerned, I know i'm still young so whatever i saied is just too early for now. All the time I'm keep thinking if i'm really suitable to live in a super village life...... so much stuff I need to face to, not easy to get any modern stuff, like if my computer is broken, where the hell I can go fix it? where to buy a router.... etc. I will be VERY VERY READY before I move to there. More, i won't expect much (but I'm a very simple man, I born in a wrong country, HK is too much for everything), i think the thing bother me the most is the computer stuff, but worst case i just fly back to HK and buy everything i need then come back. other than that, I can pop back to the field and help her family on the farm. In HK computer-related work is my primary, but if I move to there, it will be just a secondary job. I know the life will be huge difference but I'm a very active person so I guess I'm ok with all those physical work. To me, i preferred physical work then brain work, I used my brain too damn much,  I hate to hear "Awa give me a design of this and that" with no reference and instruction. in farm, weather control your outcome, but at least, you get what you work at, on a proportionally scale. in HK, i work like a fxxk , they make good profit from my work but pay me a little (ok its not only in HK, I mean generally we called it capitalism), labours are cheap assets. My mom sent me to AU spent so much on me just hope I can get a better job for living, but I don't get a fair living. This place has some problem, if you google it, HK is not a place for human being, but a heaven for bankers. All expats working in hk, only a few jobs they can do: English teacher, investment consultant(banker), thats all.

When I look at thailand, I just need to figure out how I can maintain my current work + the farm work and study, earn cheap but spend cheap, I think I'm kinda rough guy (never buy new clothes or smartphone), thats why i want to move to a jungle (Srisaket, LOL).

Although I have a great passsion to ready for this, probably after the visit next week, I come back here and crying to your guys "EHHH damn i better stay in HK" LOL. Let's see, I don't want to be too confident to something I never tired. i already assume Issan maybe a very shitty place for me, but I also be ready to adapt to it coz I don't believe anywhere can be worse than HK (I think you guys know what I mean, good or bad doesn't related to the country is developed or not, South Korean is well developed but they have the highest suicide rate, so you know my definition). A city with no soul and future.

Tonight I just dinner with my mom, she said pretty much the same thing like you guys, and more she missed me she don't want me to leave to a far place, all I can do is telling her thai is not far from HK so I can come back anytime, she never been to other country but keeps telling me thailand is not cool like I think, mom I know its not cool, but HK is even worse, Hk is part of China now. British forgot us already.

You will find most of everything you might need (computer, doctor, dentist...) in Ubon city, not in Sisaket city however...there is a big difference in development and wealth between both cities.

 

As far as living in a remote village is concerned, it is first and foremost a matter of taste and personality.

I visited Hong Kong, which I hated like I hated Monaco, because I don't feel good in a concrete jungle.

But for other people, it is the opposite...they hate nature.

 

By the way, you will see that most Isaan villagers are not nature friendly at all: they use massive quantities of pesticides, fertilizers, cut trees without replacing them and kill all the wild animals they can, and would gladly cover most of the land with cement.

 

While in Kantharalak, you might enjoy to visit the Asoke Community which is still living in the traditional Thai way, while being much more productive than the farmers around.

 

Your capacity to live and stay in an Isaan village will depend on how much you can live alone...I personaly spend months at a time without speaking to a foreigner, since there are none in my area...and that doesn't bother me, I never think about it.

 

Yet, do not expect to have with local villagers the kind of conversation you can have in Hong Kong, not only because of the language, but mostly because of the content which may seem rather childish to many foreigners...for example, they will talk for hours about the lottery results, twice a month, and how they played number 47 while the winning number was 57, which was not so far...then they will move on to the ghost that a neighbor just saw last night, and so on.

 

 

 

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You will find most of everything you might need (computer, doctor, dentist...) in Ubon city, not in Sisaket city however...there is a big difference in development and wealth between both cities.

 

As far as living in a remote village is concerned, it is first and foremost a matter of taste and personality.

I visited Hong Kong, which I hated like I hated Monaco, because I don't feel good in a concrete jungle.

But for other people, it is the opposite...they hate nature.

 

By the way, you will see that most Isaan villagers are not nature friendly at all: they use massive quantities of pesticides, fertilizers, cut trees without replacing them and kill all the wild animals they can, and would gladly cover most of the land with cement.

 

While in Kantharalak, you might enjoy to visit the Asoke Community which is still living in the traditional Thai way, while being much more productive than the farmers around.

 

Your capacity to live and stay in an Isaan village will depend on how much you can live alone...I personaly spend months at a time without speaking to a foreigner, since there are none in my area...and that doesn't bother me, I never think about it.

 

Yet, do not expect to have with local villagers the kind of conversation you can have in Hong Kong, not only because of the language, but mostly because of the content which may seem rather childish to many foreigners...for example, they will talk for hours about the lottery results, twice a month, and how they played number 47 while the winning number was 57, which was not so far...then they will move on to the ghost that a neighbor just saw last night, and so on.

 

 

 

So true. I always say, when they are not eating, they are talking about eating!

OP, don’t worry about being without essentials in SSK/Ubon.

Things are moving fast and most things are available in shops or by online purchasing. Things that are not, can be sent from Bangkok in a day or 2. It might take you a while to adapt but it’s not impossible. Just go with the flow and keep a very ‘tight reign’ on your finances, is my recommendation. Beware of the ‘get rich quick’ schemes as something that seems too good to be true usually isn’t.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Brunolem said:

You will find most of everything you might need (computer, doctor, dentist...) in Ubon city, not in Sisaket city however...there is a big difference in development and wealth between both cities.

 

As far as living in a remote village is concerned, it is first and foremost a matter of taste and personality.

I visited Hong Kong, which I hated like I hated Monaco, because I don't feel good in a concrete jungle.

But for other people, it is the opposite...they hate nature.

 

By the way, you will see that most Isaan villagers are not nature friendly at all: they use massive quantities of pesticides, fertilizers, cut trees without replacing them and kill all the wild animals they can, and would gladly cover most of the land with cement.

 

While in Kantharalak, you might enjoy to visit the Asoke Community which is still living in the traditional Thai way, while being much more productive than the farmers around.

 

Your capacity to live and stay in an Isaan village will depend on how much you can live alone...I personaly spend months at a time without speaking to a foreigner, since there are none in my area...and that doesn't bother me, I never think about it.

 

Yet, do not expect to have with local villagers the kind of conversation you can have in Hong Kong, not only because of the language, but mostly because of the content which may seem rather childish to many foreigners...for example, they will talk for hours about the lottery results, twice a month, and how they played number 47 while the winning number was 57, which was not so far...then they will move on to the ghost that a neighbor just saw last night, and so on.

 

 

 

 

20 minutes ago, DILLIGAD said:

So true. I always say, when they are not eating, they are talking about eating!

OP, don’t worry about being without essentials in SSK/Ubon.

Things are moving fast and most things are available in shops or by online purchasing. Things that are not, can be sent from Bangkok in a day or 2. It might take you a while to adapt but it’s not impossible. Just go with the flow and keep a very ‘tight reign’ on your finances, is my recommendation. Beware of the ‘get rich quick’ schemes as something that seems too good to be true usually isn’t.

 

 

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Oh ya...... lottery again.

Seems it's a big thing to them, they talk about it all the time. Always come ask me HEY AWA GIVE ME A NUMBER. Luckily my gf doesn't really into it, she buys lottery sometime but just buy it then leave it and never talk about it.

 

I don't talk so much with people but indeed I need friends sometime. Thats why I join this forum ;-)

It's cool to make friend with Isaan locals but all we know its not so easy.

 

DILLIGAD yes I will keep a very "tight reign" on my money. Once I moved to there I won't make as much money as now.

 

Good to hear I get get most of the modern stuff from Ubon, silly me just worry too much.... 2 more days later I will be in Srisaket and feel the place.

 

 

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I’m an occasional visitor to Kantharalak and it’s hinterland. I’ve enjoyed reading the contributions here and the good humour of Awa and the commenters. 

 

I hadnt heard of the Asoke Community in the Kantharalak area. Is it easy to find when you’re there?

 

cheers all

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Oh ya...... lottery again.
Seems it's a big thing to them, they talk about it all the time. Always come ask me HEY AWA GIVE ME A NUMBER. Luckily my gf doesn't really into it, she buys lottery sometime but just buy it then leave it and never talk about it.
 
I don't talk so much with people but indeed I need friends sometime. Thats why I join this forum ;-)
It's cool to make friend with Isaan locals but all we know its not so easy.
 
DILLIGAD yes I will keep a very "tight reign" on my money. Once I moved to there I won't make as much money as now.
 
Good to hear I get get most of the modern stuff from Ubon, silly me just worry too much.... 2 more days later I will be in Srisaket and feel the place.
 
 

As already said pop in to met Norbert at Pizza4u, Kanthralak or Frank in Living in the past,SSK and they will both help you, I’m sure (as would ‘Bergan’who posted above)


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9 minutes ago, Ashto said:

 

 

I hadnt heard of the Asoke Community in the Kantharalak area. Is it easy to find when you’re there?

It is easy to find as long as you are on the right road, the 221.

 

From the road 24, you turn left or right (depending on where you come from) to join road 221 in direction to Kantharalak city.

 

Then you drive about 10km and you will find the main entrance to the community on the right side...there is a big sign...along with the supermarket where they sell parts of their products.

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12 minutes ago, DILLIGAD said:


As already said pop in to met Norbert at Pizza4u, Kanthralak or Frank in Living in the past,SSK and they will both help you, I’m sure (as would ‘Bergan’who posted above)


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If you mean me, - not Bergan - you assume right!

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On 2/7/2018 at 7:02 PM, Awa Shuen said:

Her village name is Kantaraluk (maybe wrong spelled...), really no idea where it is, but we found her sister's house nearby on Google map.

Screen Shot 2017-07-07 at 7.21.02 PM.png

Kantharalak i one of the biggest districts from Sisaket and  about 65 Km from Sisaket town. Internet is not a big problem for more info drop in to Pizza4you, Mr. Norbert. The best pizza in a circle from 100 km

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5 hours ago, Brunolem said:

You will find most of everything you might need (computer, doctor, dentist...) in Ubon city, not in Sisaket city however...there is a big difference in development and wealth between both cities.

 

As far as living in a remote village is concerned, it is first and foremost a matter of taste and personality.

I visited Hong Kong, which I hated like I hated Monaco, because I don't feel good in a concrete jungle.

But for other people, it is the opposite...they hate nature.

 

By the way, you will see that most Isaan villagers are not nature friendly at all: they use massive quantities of pesticides, fertilizers, cut trees without replacing them and kill all the wild animals they can, and would gladly cover most of the land with cement.

 

While in Kantharalak, you might enjoy to visit the Asoke Community which is still living in the traditional Thai way, while being much more productive than the farmers around.

 

Your capacity to live and stay in an Isaan village will depend on how much you can live alone...I personaly spend months at a time without speaking to a foreigner, since there are none in my area...and that doesn't bother me, I never think about it.

 

Yet, do not expect to have with local villagers the kind of conversation you can have in Hong Kong, not only because of the language, but mostly because of the content which may seem rather childish to many foreigners...for example, they will talk for hours about the lottery results, twice a month, and how they played number 47 while the winning number was 57, which was not so far...then they will move on to the ghost that a neighbor just saw last night, and so on.

 

 

 

I'm not sure what time you been in Sisaket ? I live here for nearly 20 years and I have no idea what you couldn't find in Sisaket (computer, doctor, dentist...). All we need is available here and some of our specialists get their patients tranfered from Ubon to Sisaket Including eye specialists and eye clinic in Goverment Hospital.

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25 minutes ago, fishbone said:

I'm not sure what time you been in Sisaket ? I live here for nearly 20 years and I have no idea what you couldn't find in Sisaket (computer, doctor, dentist...). All we need is available here and some of our specialists get their patients tranfered from Ubon to Sisaket Including eye specialists and eye clinic in Goverment Hospital.

I don't know much about public hospitals, which I don't use for myself...so I cannot comment on that.

 

For the rest, I would say that looking for something is generally more easy in Ubon than in Sisaket, especially for someone used to big city life.

 

Ubon has its shopping centers, like Central or Sunny, with floors dedicated to all things electronics, which makes it easier for prospective customers, than roaming the city streets in search of a small shop here or a small shop there.

 

On top of that, as was mentioned by a member above, in Sisaket city one has to deal with a rather heavy traffic in narrow streets, and few parking places,...for drivers, Ubon is also more convenient...

 

 

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I would say, it’s the dangerous riders/drives are more a problem (especially after dark).


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If you mean me, - not Bergan - you assume right!

Oops, sorry my Viking friend, it’s been a while!
Dave.


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8 minutes ago, DILLIGAD said:


Oops, sorry my Viking friend, it’s been a while!
Dave.


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Maybe he lives inside Srisaket city but didn't know I'm going into a jungle.... but that's ok his info comforts me, I don't need to worry about getting modern stuff at there.

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Maybe he lives inside Srisaket city but didn't know I'm going into a jungle.... but that's ok his info comforts me, I don't need to worry about getting modern stuff at there.

No, the opposite, mate. He’s resort is out in the countryside near the disputed (Thai/Cambodian) temple


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