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Awa Shuen

Visit Srisaket next week!

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51 minutes ago, isaanbanhou said:

https://goo.gl/maps/RFMWjyfagSy

 

here is where it is located

Ah yes - the "Priests Camp Site". Have been intrigued by that descriptor on Google Earth for some time and have had Ban Krachaeng on my exercise/walk mental list for a while now. Thanks to Bergen too.

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12 hours ago, Brunolem said:

If you don't mind, I have a few questions...just out of curiosity...

 

How can you both enjoy living in a place like Hong Kong and in a place like Sisaket, which are so different?

 

Then, could you elaborate a little bit on your farming activities?

 

I find it difficult to answer your first question because I find that the diversity of the two cultures a challenge and relish the diversity, whereas your question implies that it is an obstacle. My farming activities consist of rice farming (my main income), a pineapple farm, citrus grove and cashew orchard.

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11 hours ago, bergen said:

 

The Asoke community is about half way down the 221 from the 24 to Kantharalak. Turn right at the "gated" entrance to Ban Kratchang Yai, and the community is on your right hand side after a couple hundred meters.

Thanks for confirming what I was saying...

 

If Santisuk want a few photos, I can post them...after I fetch them...

 

 

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9 hours ago, SantiSuk said:

Ah yes - the "Priests Camp Site". Have been intrigued by that descriptor on Google Earth for some time and have had Ban Krachaeng on my exercise/walk mental list for a while now. Thanks to Bergen too.

I think that "priests camp" is not a good description.

I spent some time here with my wife, invited by the village chief (poo yai baan).

They closely follow the Buddhist teachings, yet they are not a sect praying all day long.

There are some monks and a nice temple, clearly separated from the rest of the community.

There is a school with regular teachers, not monks.

All in all, the feeling is more "zen" than traditional Thai Theraveda...the teachers made me think of sensei in martial arts...discipline is strong and enforced with the end of a stick.

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2 hours ago, pnustedt said:

I find it difficult to answer your first question because I find that the diversity of the two cultures a challenge and relish the diversity, whereas your question implies that it is an obstacle. 

Not an obstacle, but more of a contradiction as in "it's either...or...".

 

Generally, people are either "city people" or "country people"...people living in New York wouldn't want to move to a farm in Montana, and farmers in Montana wouldn't want to move to New York...that is unless there was some constraint to do so, of course.

 

 

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2 hours ago, pnustedt said:

My farming activities consist of rice farming (my main income), a pineapple farm, citrus grove and cashew orchard.

I imagine you have a very large farming area, in order to get a significant income from rice and pineapple with their depressed prices.

 

The only guy in the village who makes some money with rice has about 80 rai.

My wife's best friend has 50 rai and don't make any money.

All that is after deduction of production costs and after the family (often the extended version) got their fair share of the crop...

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Thanks everyone for marking the location of the Asoke Community. I’ll visit next time I’m there. 

 

Apologies, Awa, for briefly trolling your OP! ??????

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I imagine you have a very large farming area, in order to get a significant income from rice and pineapple with their depressed prices.
 
The only guy in the village who makes some money with rice has about 80 rai.
My wife's best friend has 50 rai and don't make any money.
All that is after deduction of production costs and after the family (often the extended version) got their fair share of the crop...

I believe he does far more than just grow rice. He owns a number of harvesters and The like.


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27 minutes ago, DILLIGAD said:


I believe he does far more than just grow rice. He owns a number of harvesters and The like.


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Which would mean a very large exploitation, in order to recoup the money invested in machinery...

 

My neighbour, with one old harvester, manages to harvest 800 rai (not his) in one month during the rice harvesting season, in november-december...

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Not an obstacle, but more of a contradiction as in "it's either...or...".
 
Generally, people are either "city people" or "country people"...people living in New York wouldn't want to move to a farm in Montana, and farmers in Montana wouldn't want to move to New York...that is unless there was some constraint to do so, of course.
 
 

Maybe people are not clear-cut as you suggest, if they are from differing countries/cultures or very well traveled?


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3 hours ago, DILLIGAD said:


Maybe people are not clear-cut as you suggest, if they are from differing countries/cultures or very well traveled?


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People having worked in a big city and retiring upcountry are common...many of them are actually in Thailand, including myself.

Yet, working age people moving from working in a big city to farming are not that common.

 

As far as I am concerned, even though I don't like much big city life, I'd prefer working a well paid office job in some metropolis, rather than getting involved in large scale farming in Isaan! 

But that's only me...

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On 2/10/2018 at 10:09 AM, Brunolem said:
Not an obstacle, but more of a contradiction as in "it's either...or...".
 
Generally, people are either "city people" or "country people"...people living in New York wouldn't want to move to a farm in Montana, and farmers in Montana wouldn't want to move to New York...that is unless there was some constraint to do so, of course.


DILLIGAD  Maybe people are not clear-cut as you suggest, if they are from differing countries/cultures or very well traveled?

 

     Spot on, Dilligad, I had the same thoughts regarding this statement. Not trying to split hairs now, but what people who're living in New York want and what farmers in Montana wouldn't want is a strange example/ Plenty of farmers from Montana might be much happier to live in New York, of course having the right job/ friends, etc...

 

        Not all farmers are simple people who couldn't live in a big city. And that's the same in Thailand. A lot of people with the right skills for a particular job who find a decent job in Bangkok, might fall in love with the city life and stay there forever. And then it's hard for them to go back to their rural life. It's sad that most people in Isaan don't have factories to work in,  so there're not too many possible jobs just because the government doesn't care about the little ones. 

 

 Unfortunately, does the little man not have the chance to read different stuff on the internet that would open their eyes. But they're getting there, just a matter of time. 

     

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I lived in Manhattan for 6 years, 5 E 22nd St, right in the belly of the beast.  I love Isaan and the quiet life.  Funny what thirty years does to your energy level

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On 2/10/2018 at 10:09 AM, Brunolem said:

Not an obstacle, but more of a contradiction as in "it's either...or...".

 

Generally, people are either "city people" or "country people"...people living in New York wouldn't want to move to a farm in Montana, and farmers in Montana wouldn't want to move to New York...that is unless there was some constraint to do so, of course.

 

 

Can rednecks settle in NY nowadays - what is the world coming to? Nobody would want to move to a farm in Montana. your analogy is incongruous.

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