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Samui Bodoh

SIX MONTHS Smoke Free!!!!!!

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WhooHooo!

 

I have been smoke-free for six months! Half a year!

 

Ladies and Gentlemen, I am a believer in the old adages of "pride goeth..." and "modesty becomes...", but right at this moment I am so outrageously proud of myself that I don't care. If any members are reading this on the island and see a guy with such a huge grin on his face that he needs to enter a door sideways, that would be me.

 

Okay, I am calming down a bit...

 

What's my story? I am happy to share it here because I can do it anonymously; in the real world I lie like a rug. I was a smoker for about 35 years, I smoked about two packs a day, and despite telling people that I wanted to quit, I never really did. More accurately I never really believed that I could quit, so I didn't even try as I was too embarrassed. What did I get in return? Nothing. Nil. Nada. Zip. Zero. Absolutely nothing at all. I think that this is a point that really needs to be stressed; I got NOTHING in return. Nothing. Nothing. Nothing.

 

How have I been doing it? I have been using the "Cold Turkey" method; six months ago I decided to stop and just did. Period. I knew that this was the only way that could work for me; I have tried "cutting back" or "slowly cutting down" on the number of smokes a day and it never even remotely worked. However, although this has been working for me, I think whatever works for you is the route to follow; some people use drugs, some people can slowly cut down then quit, some people use hypnotists, etc, etc, etc. A tip for members which really helped me was putting a clear jar on my desk and everyday I would put in the exact amount of money that I would have spent on cigarettes. The first day it was meaningless, but by day 4-5 it really helped (Yes, I am cheap, but I am not smoking, so...) to be able to visualize all the money wasted.

 

What is important is stopping, not how you stop. 

 

What are the benefits? I ride my bicycle every day for about 20 KM (have for years) and now when I get home I do not have the 'chest burn' or 'lung burn' (smokers know what I am talking about) anymore. Honestly, I have been paying close attention to this for the last several days and I can actually notice a difference on the amount of oxygen that I pull into my lungs now. I don't stink of smoke. I have not wasted around 31,500 Baht (2 packs a day/87 Baht a pack/180 days). I taste food and drink soooooo much more now; I have always loved Thai food, but it is like I am tasting it for the first time again! Absolutely <deleted>' delicious!

 

The most important thing, coincidentally the most difficult to describe easily, is that I feel 'free'. When I was smoking, I was always at the mercy of cigarettes. If it was late at night and I ran out of smokes, I would take off my pajamas, get dressed again and go out to a store to buy more. I am from a cold, snowy country, so I would go out in a blizzard to get smokes! When I would have a smoke around my non-smoking friends, I always felt the need to step away from them; now I don't have to anymore. If I was doing something in "nature', I no longer feel the need to ensure that I have enough smokes "just in case". You all see the pattern; I was tied to them and considered them in everything that I did; now I don't. And I am MUCH happier that I am not tied anymore. 

 

Hmm...I have just re-read the above paragraph and I think I have not been clear enough; EVERYTHING that I did, all day every day, had an element of 'will I have enough cigarettes for this' to it. That is embarrassing to admit but it is true; perhaps that is the real meaning of addiction.

 

Is there a downside? Unfortunately, yes. I gained 8-10 Kilos. It seems to have peaked and ever so slowly (very, very slowly) I am losing the extra weight, but when you quit smoking it seems that you gain weight. I think it is a bit different for each person, but there it is. What can I say? Deal with it! It is MUCH better than smoking. I am turning my thoughts to seriously losing it now, and hopefully in my seven-month posting will have some results.

 

Am I a non-smoker now? No. I live in (terrible) fear that I will start again and I am utterly determined to NOT let that happen. I don't know what to say about this issue; I feel that if I have even ONE cigarette, I'll be back on two packs a day within twenty-four hours. That said, I am very, very conscious of this and forever vigilant against slipping. Perhaps one day I will consider myself a non-smoker, but I think that day is still far away.

 

Can YOU (the reader) quit? Yes. Should you quit? Yes. Do you need a kick in the ass to help you get started?

 

Kick! Kick! Kick! Kick! Kick! Kick!

 

Okay, I enjoyed that. The simple truth is that if you are a smoker and you clicked on several links to find your way to this post, you have an interest in quitting smoking. And, lets face it, it is difficult. It truly sucks a lot of the time. However, it is VERY, VERY, VERY worth it.

 

I know that in my post(s) at four months and five months, many members shared their stories, comments and gave their support (Thank You!). How is everyone doing? Still going strong? Any stumbles? I don't want to name anyone (or even a username) as I deeply appreciate the anonymity here.

 

So, a general "How's it going? Got something to say?"

 

PS I have some questions for those who have already quit; 

 

  1. Did you gain weight? How much? Did you subsequently lose it? Any special method? Was it different from the usual gaining of a few pounds? Any thoughts/advice?
  2. How long until you felt like a "non-smoker"? Was there any... indicator(s)/marker(s)/milestone(s) which made you think you had achieved that? Did you stop the first time or need a few attempts at it before you became a true non-smoker? Any thoughts/advice?

 

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I put on a shed load of weight when I stopped a year ago, hard to shift but do-able, after about 6 months  (now) you should start thinking about diet.

 

Keep up the good work.

 

I have a friend who was an inspiration to me when he quit, I could not go on smoking if he had quit...so I quit too.

 

Now a year on he is smoking again with an "I can give it up any time I like" attitude.

 

It bothers me but I have to be strong for myself..I never want to smoke again

 

YOUR LIFE -YOUR CHOICE

 

Good luck

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9 hours ago, ThaiPauly said:

I put on a shed load of weight when I stopped a year ago, hard to shift but do-able, after about 6 months  (now) you should start thinking about diet.

 

Keep up the good work.

 

I have a friend who was an inspiration to me when he quit, I could not go on smoking if he had quit...so I quit too.

 

Now a year on he is smoking again with an "I can give it up any time I like" attitude.

 

It bothers me but I have to be strong for myself..I never want to smoke again

 

YOUR LIFE -YOUR CHOICE

 

Good luck

Thanks for the kind words and wishes; they are truly appreciated.

 

I hear a sense of bitterness in your words regarding your friend (Er... you know what I mean...). If I may tell you something that you already know; your friend is the sole person who decides whether he smokes or not. I don't want to sound hard-hearted, but there isn't anything that you can do to help him if he goes down that path; did you listen when people told you to quit (I sure as hell didn't!)? Can I suggest a gentle "what the eff is the matter with you?" conversation, then leave it at that until he comes to his senses?

 

"...It bothers me but I have to be strong for myself..I never want to smoke again.."

 

Words to live by.

 

Stay strong, my brother!

 

Cheers

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What happened to all the people quitting smoking?

 

I'd love to hear from everyone... How's it going? What challenges are you having? What can you tell people thinking of quitting or just beginning the process?

 

Any/all thoughts welcome!

 

Cheers

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Coming up 4 years, and still fighting the urge on occasions. But otherwise very happy.

 

I was battling other issues at the time I quit smoking (and drinking), and so it was some time before I began to realise the magnitude of my decision. Like you, I went cold turkey after being told by my doctor that I had had a heart attack. Now that's not a bad incentive to quit, right? :smile: Anyway, as the months rolled by the realisation of what I had achieved came slowly, mostly triggered by going past beer bars and seeing the patrons indulging. As my health improved, I felt thoroughly satisfied with my smug self when my doctor told me that my lungs sounded very clear for the first time in years. Perhaps that was the most notable moment for me in quitting. Then I returned home and began charging around the place on a bicycle. Man! I felt complete. At 66, I feel quite happy with my lot, and I know that it's because I gave up the durries for good.

 

Sure, there are ageing problems, but I feel much more empowered in handling them. Cheers.

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54 minutes ago, Dexlowe said:

Coming up 4 years, and still fighting the urge on occasions. But otherwise very happy.

 

I was battling other issues at the time I quit smoking (and drinking), and so it was some time before I began to realise the magnitude of my decision. Like you, I went cold turkey after being told by my doctor that I had had a heart attack. Now that's not a bad incentive to quit, right? :smile: Anyway, as the months rolled by the realisation of what I had achieved came slowly, mostly triggered by going past beer bars and seeing the patrons indulging. As my health improved, I felt thoroughly satisfied with my smug self when my doctor told me that my lungs sounded very clear for the first time in years. Perhaps that was the most notable moment for me in quitting. Then I returned home and began charging around the place on a bicycle. Man! I felt complete. At 66, I feel quite happy with my lot, and I know that it's because I gave up the durries for good.

 

Sure, there are ageing problems, but I feel much more empowered in handling them. Cheers.

Congrats!

 

I find it a little... uncomfortable to hear that you still get the occasional craving four years later; they really are insidious, aren't they?

 

I too stopped drinking a long time ago (long before I stopped smoking). I wonder how much more difficult it is to stop smoking while still drinking? Anyone care to take a crack at that?

 

Great to hear of another guy on a bicycle; I cycle every morning. I truly can't think of a better way to start the day; if you can get up and go cycle 20 KM, everything else that you do that day is easier.

 

Cheers

 

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I still drink on average 3-4 bottles a night and think the majority of my weight gain is from that.

It's not easy carrying an extra 20-25 kilo's more than your used to.

Still there is no way i'm giving up my last vice:smile: in Thailand.

Early semi retirement was a breeze till i gave up smoking now some dedication is going to be required with exercise to lose that weight.( As i lay on a banana lounge writing this:saai:)  

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On 3/29/2018 at 12:28 PM, farmerjo said:

I still drink on average 3-4 bottles a night and think the majority of my weight gain is from that.

It's not easy carrying an extra 20-25 kilo's more than your used to.

Still there is no way i'm giving up my last vice:smile: in Thailand.

Early semi retirement was a breeze till i gave up smoking now some dedication is going to be required with exercise to lose that weight.( As i lay on a banana lounge writing this:saai:)  

It is a truly brave man who talks about dedication to exercise while lounging on a banana lounge having a beer...

 

:cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy:

 

That's panache...

 

I have some bad news for you (and it was a shock to me)... As I gained the pounds, I did research on how to lose it. Long and short of it is that exercise doesn't matter much in weight loss. Please don't misunderstand me; exercise is a VERY good thing, but unless you are doing a truly huge amount it doesn't really affect your waistline.

 

Time to eat right and better. And no more chips or cookies. Hmm... sorry, that is my advice for me!

 

Cheers

 

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Im so happy about that! I know its really really hard to quick smoking. I hope you will never get back to it. I would recommend you some pills on https://nootropicboost.com. They are really helpfull with that! They improve the cognitive abilities. Its really good!

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a job well done OP,  keep on not smoking

 

becoming a non-smoker you can't, but you can become previous smoker/smoke quitter/smoke stopper have your pick

 

I have quit twice,

first time after 20 years of smoking, stopped for 10 years then started again

then now the 2nd time after having smoked for 10 years

 

2nd time was this year - so I am also half a year free of smoke now

 

gained weight? YES

don't think it matters much if you drink or not, except on the kilos

 

what many say that food/drink tastes a lot better I have never experienced

I guess not everybody experience the same - we are different

 

but my smelling has improved a lot, and I myself smell better

 

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Congratulations,

 

Anyone who has quit deserves high praise as it's the hardest thing in the world to do, nothing else comes close.

 

It took me until I was 62 to finally do it after umpteen failures, in fact I still can't believe I did it. The guy that inspired me to quit (if he can do it then so can I ) is back to smoking 20 a day at 69 years old and I fear for him, but there is no telling him "I can quit when I want- I did it before remember?" is his mantra, I don't think he'll be able to quit again now unless a tragedy befalls him healthwise.

 

So well done, whatever happens never say yes to even one for there starts the downward spiral to that box that has your name on it, it will always be waiting, make it wait a lot lot longer.

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