Jump to content
BANGKOK 21 March 2019 19:06
Jimjim1968

Online Teaching

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Loaded said:

The two threads your cite are from 2014 when internet teaching didn't exist.

 

California Virtual University opened in the late 90s.  MIT offered an open courseware project online in 2002.  Kahn Academy was founded in 2008.  By 2009, an estimated five and a half million students were taking at least one online course. By 2014, 98% of public colleges and universities were offering online learning.  From this graphic.

 

Distance learning is as old as the hills.  The only thing that has changed is the technology that supports it.  There have been correspondence courses for decades.  If a student in Japan participates in one of my correspondence courses, am I working illegally?  All we're doing is sending mail back and forth.

 

2 minutes ago, Loaded said:

Digital Nomads were/are usually foreigners using a blog to make a little extra cash from clicks from Google Adwords linked to their websites.

 

Teaching is a profession and is controlled by a whole swathe of rules and regulations.

 

There's a difference.

 

Whatever difference you are suggesting, immigration doesn't care about it.  Their job is to control the entry and exit of foreigners and set conditions on their behavior during their stay.  

 

The rules and regulations governing teaching apply to teachers (both foreign or domestic) working in Thailand for Thai people.

 

Until we get something more recent, those statements from 2014 are our best information on what immigration thinks about foreigners in Thailand employed by overseas companies and working for overseas clients.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The two threads your cite are from 2014 when internet teaching didn't exist."

 

We are discussing internet teaching in Thailand so I thought the context would be obvious. If it makes it easier for you, I'll rewrite:

 

""The two threads your cite are from 2014 when internet teaching in Thailand didn't exist."

 

Internet teaching existed in the US before 2014 - yippee!!!

The US isn't Thailand so Thai visa and work permit requirements were irrelevant.

 

It didn't exist, or was on a minuscule scale, in Thailand before 2014 - reality!!!!

but teachers need non-imm visas and work permits as they are conducting work in Thailand

 

 

Edited by Loaded
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Loaded said:

The two threads your cite are from 2014 when internet teaching didn't exist.

 

Digital Nomads were/are usually foreigners using a blog to make a little extra cash from clicks from Google Adwords linked to their websites.

 

Teaching is a profession and is controlled by a whole swathe of rules and regulations.

 

There's a difference.

I really think you're getting confused with concepts.  As you say teaching Thai students in Thai establishments is highly regulated, but this simply isn't the case with online teaching to other nationalities where having a TEFL certificate is enough and in any case is no real concern of the Thai authorities unless requested.  You have been provided with numerous explanations and examples but continue to assert a case that simply does not exist at present.

 

For my part, I think the attitude of the Thai authorities is likely guided by the type of activity- we can assume they do not place TEFL teaching in the same category as smuggling dodgy aircraft parts for instance, as one is legal and wholesome, while the other not.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ridiculous.  Do you really think that either immigration or the labor department would even entertain my applying for a permit to work for a company in another country?
That's the whole point. If you were working for a UK company in Thailand, you would still need a work permit. The UK company would need to partner with a Thai company or create a Thai company in order to process the visa and work permit.

That isn't happening with these Chinese companies. They are ignoring Lab or and Immigration law.

Sent from my CPH1701 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Loaded said:

That's the whole point. If you were working for a UK company in Thailand, you would still need a work permit. The UK company would need to partner with a Thai company or create a Thai company in order to process the visa and work permit.

That isn't happening with these Chinese companies. They are ignoring Lab or and Immigration law.

Sent from my CPH1701 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
 

You are getting lost in theory.  The reality is that it is not treated as against the law, and is any case is largely undetectable.  In addition, the activity concerned is not in any way shady.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are getting lost in theory.  The reality is that it is not treated as against the law, and is any case is largely undetectable.  In addition, the activity concerned is not in any way shady.
 
 
Not yet

Sent from my CPH1701 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Loaded said:

Not yet

Sent from my CPH1701 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
 

Well that is sheer speculation, and might be applied to just about anything we do in Thailand, as we have already seen with vaping for example.

 

I think the key point with online teaching is whether it is classified as working in or out of the Thai jurisdiction: out it seems, although that might be more a classification of convenience as it would be rather a  difficult problem to tackle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2018 at 4:56 AM, Scott said:

Sometime ago, I asked an immigration officer about computer work and whether it was a violation of the law.   Keep in mind this was several years ago, and online teaching was really not on the radar at the time.

 

What he told me is that immigration was not going to go after people for internet based work, UNLESS  they were working in a central location, such as an office where a number of people are employed.  

 

He also said that it was probably illegal, but it would be hard to prove they were working and that unless they had some very good reason to go after someone, it wasn't the type of thing they went looking for.  

 

So, is it illegal if you don't have a work permit?   Yes.  

It really has nothing to do with immigration. Try asking the Ministry of Labour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Johnniey said:

It really has nothing to do with immigration. Try asking the Ministry of Labour.

I am not going to get into a pedantic argument over it, but immigration certainly DOES have something to do with it.   Go ahead and get caught working on a retirement -- and see who sends you on your way out of the country or revokes your visa.    It won't be the Labor Ministry.  

 

Immigration makes periodic visits to our school.   Not very often, but they have.    There has never been anyone from the Ministry of Labor ever show up.  

 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many teachers do a bit of teaching on the side, at students' houses, or their own?

 

How many have ever been arrested for this? In 25 years, I've never heard of one.

 

I even taught the Klong Tan police before the Asian games here! I've taught the kids of the boss of the Ministry of Labour. I've been asked a few times to teach immigration officers.

 

In Thailand, there are ways around everything. It is a developing country, where corruption is rife.

 

I asked the deputy commander of police about online gambling. He said it was OK as the bets were not actually made in Thailand. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we can stop with the trolling and off-topic deflections.   The thread is about online teaching. 

 

Most people living in Thailand know the legal lay of the land.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Johnniey said:

How many teachers do a bit of teaching on the side, at students' houses, or their own?

 

How many have ever been arrested for this? In 25 years, I've never heard of one.

 

I even taught the Klong Tan police before the Asian games here! I've taught the kids of the boss of the Ministry of Labour. I've been asked a few times to teach immigration officers.

 

In Thailand, there are ways around everything. It is a developing country, where corruption is rife.

 

I asked the deputy commander of police about online gambling. He said it was OK as the bets were not actually made in Thailand. 

You taught the boss of the Ministry of Labor's kids and you are on personal terms with the Deputy Commander of Police - wow!!!!

 

Are you also in the SAS?

 

Getting back to your comment about online gambling:

 

"...The five have been charged with conducting illegal online gambling and working in the country without a permit."

 

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30328650

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Loaded said:

You taught the boss of the Ministry of Labor's kids and you are on personal terms with the Deputy Commander of Police - wow!!!!

 

Are you also in the SAS?

 

Getting back to your comment about online gambling:

 

"...The five have been charged with conducting illegal online gambling and working in the country without a permit."

 

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30328650

 

Online teaching need not be confused with running an illegal syndicate which conducts an activity known to be against the law.

 

Online teaching is either not illegal for a farang not having a work permit or is treated as such, and this we can clearly see happening.

 

It is predominantly an activity where most defining factors are not part of Thai jurisdiction, eg, the activity technically takes place at the registered address of the company.  The situation is different if one is servicing Thai students and working for a Thai company.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Loaded said:

You taught the boss of the Ministry of Labor's kids and you are on personal terms with the Deputy Commander of Police - wow!!!!

 

Are you also in the SAS?

 

Getting back to your comment about online gambling:

 

"...The five have been charged with conducting illegal online gambling and working in the country without a permit."

 

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30328650

I mean the boss in the provincial ministry of labour, not the Minister of Labour :)

 

Yes, I'm friendly with the head policeman of 7 provinces in northern Isarn. I have taught his staff in the CSD, and his daughter. I think his title is actually assistant commissioner in English.

 

It's very important to make friends in high places if you live in Thailand for a long time. Join the local clubs, tennis, rotary etc.

 

Sorry about your low self-esteem. I know how it feels to not even get on the Thai hierarchical ladder, as an English teacher, believe me - I was there for many years.

Newbies like you often think that we are stuck at some lowly level. It is just not true, we can rise! 

 

The link you showed, the betting was made in Thailand.

 

 

Edited by Johnniey
  • Like 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...