Jump to content
BANGKOK 24 March 2019 16:16
Jimjim1968

Online Teaching

Recommended Posts

I think that if you are knownly teaching online to Thai students while based in Thailand you could fall foul of something, But, only if you are trying to get a visa to stay in Thailand, There are several,visas.. B visa for work, O married which entitles you to work, and business visa, all would be requiring certain-restrictions etc to to be permitted for visa. and work permit. The easier one is the married Visa, but funds may be required and the correct legal paperwork. Now if you are teaching on line for a company registered in another country and teaching students not in Thailand, plus payment is made in another country and those funds are then transferred to your account yourself in Thailand, You should declare income on your tax return here,  and then you will stay illegal,  I earn extra 150 to 300,000 per year online teaching, and by the time I declare for wife, child, grandparents and self 2000 baht tax ...not a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, phetpeter said:

I think that if you are knownly teaching online to Thai students while based in Thailand you could fall foul of something, But, only if you are trying to get a visa to stay in Thailand, There are several,visas.. B visa for work, O married which entitles you to work, and business visa, all would be requiring certain-restrictions etc to to be permitted for visa. and work permit. The easier one is the married Visa, but funds may be required and the correct legal paperwork. Now if you are teaching on line for a company registered in another country and teaching students not in Thailand, plus payment is made in another country and those funds are then transferred to your account yourself in Thailand, You should declare income on your tax return here,  and then you will stay illegal,  I earn extra 150 to 300,000 per year online teaching, and by the time I declare for wife, child, grandparents and self 2000 baht tax ...not a problem.

Shouldn't be that much. My allowances come to more than 300,000.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Johnniey said:

I mean the boss in the provincial ministry of labour, not the Minister of Labour :)

 

Yes, I'm friendly with the head policeman of 7 provinces in northern Isarn. I have taught his staff in the CSD, and his daughter. I think his title is actually assistant commissioner in English.

 

It's very important to make friends in high places if you live in Thailand for a long time. Join the local clubs, tennis, rotary etc.

 

Sorry about your low self-esteem. I know how it feels to not even get on the Thai hierarchical ladder, as an English teacher, believe me - I was there for many years.

Newbies like you often think that we are stuck at some lowly level. It is just not true, we can rise! 

 

The link you showed, the betting was made in Thailand.

 

 

It is easy to get a siege mentality in Thailand- it all starts with the basic visa situation regarding teaching, and soon it seems everything is frowned upon.  

 

You are quite right about the example of the gambling syndicate- not only was it illegal, but it was clearly being run from Thailand and not Korea.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2018 at 9:56 PM, Scott said:

So, is it illegal if you don't have a work permit?   Yes.  

Nobody is claiming it isn't illegal, but it is of no consequence if it is illegal or not if there is no enforcement of the law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, phetpeter said:

I think that if you are knownly teaching online to Thai students while based in Thailand you could fall foul of something, But, only if you are trying to get a visa to stay in Thailand, There are several,visas.. B visa for work, O married which entitles you to work, and business visa, all would be requiring certain-restrictions etc to to be permitted for visa. and work permit. The easier one is the married Visa, but funds may be required and the correct legal paperwork. Now if you are teaching on line for a company registered in another country and teaching students not in Thailand, plus payment is made in another country and those funds are then transferred to your account yourself in Thailand, You should declare income on your tax return here,  and then you will stay illegal,  I earn extra 150 to 300,000 per year online teaching, and by the time I declare for wife, child, grandparents and self 2000 baht tax ...not a problem.

I think revenue earned outside Thailand is not under the Thai jurisdiction. If any tax is due it would be in the originating country. It would be almost impossible to prove anyway,

 

The letter of the law is only the half of it- there is context, and interpretation.  Thus, teaching in an office surrounded by computers might be illegal, whereas sitting in your studio flat might not be, if only because of privacy.  It's about not being seen to be breaking the law really.

Edited by mommysboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like with most things there is a scale but illegal is illegal.  If I was an I/O I could bag people all day I see blatantly posting on public FB groups about jobs they want or services offered.  From chefs to translators, photographers, tour guides, charter captains, nannies, home cleaners, tattoo artists to guy running a second had shop from home buying up all the second hand stuff than marking it up for resale, I see it all.  Let's face it, you can't claim you are on the internet making money and not think a government will want a piece of the action.  Digital nomads loopholing the system and worse yet, thinking it's legal, ain't gonna last for ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ThaiWai said:

Like with most things there is a scale but illegal is illegal.  If I was an I/O I could bag people all day I see blatantly posting on public FB groups about jobs they want or services offered.  From chefs to translators, photographers, tour guides, charter captains, nannies, home cleaners, tattoo artists to guy running a second had shop from home buying up all the second hand stuff than marking it up for resale, I see it all.  Let's face it, you can't claim you are on the internet making money and not think a government will want a piece of the action.  Digital nomads loopholing the system and worse yet, thinking it's legal, ain't gonna last for ever.

 

It's not illegal!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Johnniey said:

I mean the boss in the provincial ministry of labour, not the Minister of Labour :)

 

Yes, I'm friendly with the head policeman of 7 provinces in northern Isarn. I have taught his staff in the CSD, and his daughter. I think his title is actually assistant commissioner in English.

 

It's very important to make friends in high places if you live in Thailand for a long time. Join the local clubs, tennis, rotary etc.

 

Sorry about your low self-esteem. I know how it feels to not even get on the Thai hierarchical ladder, as an English teacher, believe me - I was there for many years.

Newbies like you often think that we are stuck at some lowly level. It is just not true, we can rise! 

 

The link you showed, the betting was made in Thailand.

 

 

You gotta be kidding calling Loaded a newbie. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2018 at 12:51 PM, Loaded said:

The two threads your cite are from 2014 when internet teaching didn't exist.

 

Digital Nomads were/are usually foreigners using a blog to make a little extra cash from clicks from Google Adwords linked to their websites.

 

Teaching is a profession and is controlled by a whole swathe of rules and regulations.

 

There's a difference.

Oh please, I developed online graduate courses at Thunderbird School of Global Management in 1994.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2018 at 8:08 AM, Loaded said:

Most online teaching in Thailand is illegal.

 

The teacher works in Thailand without the required non-immigrant visa and work permit. The teacher doesn't declare their income to the Thai tax authorities.

 

The Chinese company earns income from their overseas operations in Thailand. They fail to provide the required visas and work permit for their staff. They avoid Thai tax on their revenues. They don't have a Thai school license. I could go on.

 

It won't continue for much longer once the Thai government realizes what's happening under their noses.

 

 

It's not illegal at all. The immigration just held a seminar in Chiang Mai for all the digital nomads there. If you are not working for a Thai company and you aren't overstaying your visa it is completely legal. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2018 at 8:08 AM, Loaded said:

Most online teaching in Thailand is illegal.

 

 

Most of THAILAND is illegal.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4. A foreigner sits in his apartment in Chiang Mai and teaches Chinese students online via Skype.

The verdict: " Officially, work, however it is not a main concern to our office now, so we allow the foreigner to do this without a work permit. "

This verdict considers the scale of the work and the environment.

 

hat is said below is for Chiang Mai. It could be difference in other parts of Thailand. The answer is from an interview March 1 2018 "   You find the interview, with more examples at http://www.chiangmailocator.com/wiki-can-digital-nomads-legally-work-in-thailand-p177

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A follow-up question to the first in this matter is of course, If you should pay tax, does it follow the same rules as for Thai? No tax if the annual fee is lower then 150 000 baht and benefits of some social advantages.

Edited by Parsve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being circumspect: we all know of the injustice suffered by the humble TEFL teacher in Thailand, so if a rule actually falls in their favour.....then I say they deserve a bit of luck.  And if some perfectly good teachers are taken out of the Thai system because of it then perhaps there needs to be a rethink of this shoddy policy- at the moment some good talent is overlooked.

Edited by mommysboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Parsve said:

4. A foreigner sits in his apartment in Chiang Mai and teaches Chinese students online via Skype.

The verdict: " Officially, work, however it is not a main concern to our office now, so we allow the foreigner to do this without a work permit. "

This verdict considers the scale of the work and the environment.

 

hat is said below is for Chiang Mai. It could be difference in other parts of Thailand. The answer is from an interview March 1 2018 "   You find the interview, with more examples at http://www.chiangmailocator.com/wiki-can-digital-nomads-legally-work-in-thailand-p177

That's a great posting.  Read in to it what you will, but it appears to me that at this stage they are not bothered because it is doing no harm and would in any case be very difficult to enforce.  Anybody who knows Thailand will also be aware that visibility is a key issue too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...