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Jimjim1968

Online Teaching

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The main point is you are allowed to teach, most online teaching is not for Thai students, it is for Chinese students, You are working under contract as a freelance tutor. It is your responsibility to declare if required under the law of the country you are in. You are not breaking any Thai laws unless the money is paid to you direct to Thailand, which it is not. Money you transfer into Thailand is legal and should be declare in the country bank account you keep it. Transferring for personal use is not taxable if it is under a certain each month and you then do not have to confirm where your money is coming from as it will be from income from savings. Simple don't teach online to Thai students unless the company is will to fulfill the legal requirements for teaching Thai's

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5 hours ago, phetpeter said:

The main point is you are allowed to teach, most online teaching is not for Thai students, it is for Chinese students, You are working under contract as a freelance tutor. It is your responsibility to declare if required under the law of the country you are in. You are not breaking any Thai laws unless the money is paid to you direct to Thailand, which it is not. Money you transfer into Thailand is legal and should be declare in the country bank account you keep it. Transferring for personal use is not taxable if it is under a certain each month and you then do not have to confirm where your money is coming from as it will be from income from savings. Simple don't teach online to Thai students unless the company is will to fulfill the legal requirements for teaching Thai's

 

In any other country your reasoning might be flawless.  However, it is regarded as working without the required visa and thus is unlawful- wouldn't you know!  Luckily, the authorities aren't bothered.

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5 hours ago, phetpeter said:

The main point is you are allowed to teach, most online teaching is not for Thai students, it is for Chinese students, You are working under contract as a freelance tutor. It is your responsibility to declare if required under the law of the country you are in. You are not breaking any Thai laws unless the money is paid to you direct to Thailand, which it is not. Money you transfer into Thailand is legal and should be declare in the country bank account you keep it. Transferring for personal use is not taxable if it is under a certain each month and you then do not have to confirm where your money is coming from as it will be from income from savings. Simple don't teach online to Thai students unless the company is will to fulfill the legal requirements for teaching Thai's

 

You clearly have NO clue about Thai labour law. Stop giving incorrect information.

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21 hours ago, mommysboy said:

 

In any other country your reasoning might be flawless.  However, it is regarded as working without the required visa and thus is unlawful- wouldn't you know!  Luckily, the authorities aren't bothered.

You must be one of the old dinosaurs people talk about on TV.  Two days ago in Chiang Mai, they just had another huge conference for the digital nomads there where Immigration and the Thai Labor Office spoke. As long as you aren't overstaying your visa (no matter what visa you are on) and they money isn't coming from a Thai company it's legal. 

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6 hours ago, diddygq said:

You must be one of the old dinosaurs people talk about on TV.  Two days ago in Chiang Mai, they just had another huge conference for the digital nomads there where Immigration and the Thai Labor Office spoke. As long as you aren't overstaying your visa (no matter what visa you are on) and they money isn't coming from a Thai company it's legal. 

Try reading the whole thread: we discovered that by the letter of the law it is unlawful.  There are various factors that are taken in to consideration.  Tellingly, the official interviewed in Chiang Mai described online teaching without a visa as technically illegal, but also went on to say that it was tolerated as it caused no concern.  The scale of operation, the venue (home), and the extent to which Thai resources are used are factors.

 

The new directive is aimed at larger scale investors, and tech innovators.

 

I am glad it does not appear to be illegal.  On balance I feel it is not under Thai jurisdiction.

 

 

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9 hours ago, mommysboy said:

Try reading the whole thread: we discovered that by the letter of the law it is unlawful.  There are various factors that are taken in to consideration.  Tellingly, the official interviewed in Chiang Mai described online teaching without a visa as technically illegal, but also went on to say that it was tolerated as it caused no concern.  The scale of operation, the venue (home), and the extent to which Thai resources are used are factors.

 

The new directive is aimed at larger scale investors, and tech innovators.

 

I am glad it does not appear to be illegal.  On balance I feel it is not under Thai jurisdiction.

 

 

Working with or without a visa is not the point. The point is that there is not a visa or work permit to cover such work. Therefore, there is no law to govern this and that appears to be why the officials are tolerating it.

 

Being a digital nomas in Thailand has been a grey area long before the apparent boom of online teaching.

 

There was a question asked earlier on this thread "Who is going to go to immigration or labour office and admit to online teaching?"(or words to that effect). My question would be "Who would go to immigration and labour office to apply for an extension of stay and work permit, based on online teaching, if in fact there was one?"

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1 hour ago, youreavinalaff said:

Working with or without a visa is not the point. The point is that there is not a visa or work permit to cover such work. Therefore, there is no law to govern this and that appears to be why the officials are tolerating it.

 

Being a digital nomas in Thailand has been a grey area long before the apparent boom of online teaching.

 

There was a question asked earlier on this thread "Who is going to go to immigration or labour office and admit to online teaching?"(or words to that effect). My question would be "Who would go to immigration and labour office to apply for an extension of stay and work permit, based on online teaching, if in fact there was one?"

Try this

 

http://www.mol.go.th/sites/default/files/downloads/pdf/WORKING_OF_ALIEN_ACT_2551_DOE.pdf

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2 hours ago, youreavinalaff said:

Working with or without a visa is not the point. The point is that there is not a visa or work permit to cover such work. Therefore, there is no law to govern this and that appears to be why the officials are tolerating it.

 

Being a digital nomas in Thailand has been a grey area long before the apparent boom of online teaching.

 

There was a question asked earlier on this thread "Who is going to go to immigration or labour office and admit to online teaching?"(or words to that effect). My question would be "Who would go to immigration and labour office to apply for an extension of stay and work permit, based on online teaching, if in fact there was one?"

I think you have become a little abstracted.

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1 hour ago, Loaded said:

That is the exact same act that the officials are saying does not cover the matter of digital nomads. Clearly it needs to be amended to accommodate such work. 

 

It really does not bother me either way. I am just trying to put a different angle on matters rather than half saying a definite "yes" and half saying a definite "No". This is grey, not black and white.

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33 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

That is the exact same act that the officials are saying does not cover the matter of digital nomads. Clearly it needs to be amended to accommodate such work. 

 

It really does not bother me either way. I am just trying to put a different angle on matters rather than half saying a definite "yes" and half saying a definite "No". This is grey, not black and white.

 

The other thing is that the letter of the law is only the half of it.  It is really more a case of someone at a higher level deciding whether it is legal or not.  Then, as I said, it's about activity, scale, feasibility, etc.

 

Only one poster insists it is a black and white issue.

 

 

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33 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

That is the exact same act that the officials are saying does not cover the matter of digital nomads. Clearly it needs to be amended to accommodate such work. 

 

It really does not bother me either way. I am just trying to put a different angle on matters rather than half saying a definite "yes" and half saying a definite "No". This is grey, not black and white.

It covers 'aliens' working in Thailand.

 

Your argument that because online teaching to China isn't mentioned so it's not covered is silly.

 

Online teachers break a number of employment related laws. There does seem to be widespread tolerance of this lawbreaking. However, online teaching is getting bigger and bigger and eventually the authorities will notice and act. 

 

Blocking the URLs and the Thai government making official protests to China would kill the industry.

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40 minutes ago, Loaded said:

It covers 'aliens' working in Thailand.

 

Your argument that because online teaching to China isn't mentioned so it's not covered is silly.

 

Online teachers break a number of employment related laws. There does seem to be widespread tolerance of this lawbreaking. However, online teaching is getting bigger and bigger and eventually the authorities will notice and act. 

 

Blocking the URLs and the Thai government making official protests to China would kill the industry.

They may be breaking a number of laws.  I don't think it is certain at all.  You could get away with probable.  Just the one as far as I can see.

 

As you say, there is widespread tolerance and, as another pointed out, it could be that they don't give a toss because absolutely no harm is being done.

 

Why would it be banned?

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41 minutes ago, Loaded said:

It covers 'aliens' working in Thailand.

 

Your argument that because online teaching to China isn't mentioned so it's not covered is silly.

 

Online teachers break a number of employment related laws. There does seem to be widespread tolerance of this lawbreaking. However, online teaching is getting bigger and bigger and eventually the authorities will notice and act. 

 

Blocking the URLs and the Thai government making official protests to China would kill the industry.

If you read what you quoted, you will see I am talking about being a digital nomad. Not just teaching in China.

 

Protests from Thailand to China killing the industry....that's funny. Not only would China likely laugh it off, there are digital nomads all over the world working with clients all over the world.

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Loaded seems to equate online teaching with criminal activity- frankly, that's mental!

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