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free123

Thuja Brabant in Thailand available surviveable ?

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Hello..  I am new here in this section of thai visa... and i want to ask the garden experts here if the hedge thuja brabant is available in Thailand and if yes where to buy it and will it survive in such a hot climate... i want to fence the house with this thuja but could not find any relevant information on the net... all info i can get is about europe not Thailand...

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Welcome free123, You may want to know also about the Plants, Pets and Vets forum, which is a little more oriented to landscape plants, more so than farming. 

 

I have not seen the Thuja plants you ask about, but that doesn't mean they can't be found.  I encourage you to look at other possibillities for your hedge; plants that have been tried and true for local conditions.   It's always risky to create a mono-culture of plants of any kind, but to use an unknown species that haven't been established as suitable for the climate and local pest and disease conditions, is taking a big chance with your investment and possible disappointment. 

 

I don't know Thuja occidentalis 'Brabant' which appears to be a UK favorite, but I have worked with other Thuja varieties quite a bit in California USA, including the 'Emerald Green' cultivar of Thuja occidentalis , which appears similar. The parent species of both cultivars is native to eastern Canada and notheastern US, a temperate climate.  I would not expect them to do well here in a tropical monsoon climate. And you could find that they are susceptible to local pest and disease issues. Pest and disease management may require heavy use of pesticides. But I'm not sure. 

 

Even in California, the Emerald Green arborvitaes get a host of problems that I have been called on to try and control: 

Insect Pests

The cypress tip miner (Argyresthia cupressella) attacks "Emerald Green" arborvitaes on the West Coast where female moths lay eggs on the tips of branches. Larvae feed on the needles throughout winter, causing foliage to yellow and turn brown. The green color is generally restored during the growing season. Webs and cocoons on arborvitae, with silvery tan moths flying out when you shake branches, are evidence of the presence of this insect pest. Control by cutting out branches with heavy infestations or spray in springtime with an acephate-containing insecticide.

Canker Disease

Canker diseases cause foliage to wilt and turn yellow or brown. A resinous oozing from bark of infected branches is often present during canker attack. Cytospora canker causes reddish brown cankers and sunken places in the bark. Prune out diseased branches, cutting back to healthy tissue. Fertilize plants lightly to promote healthy growth, but avoid heavy fertilization, which can cause susceptibility to disease. You must destroy plants infected with cankers on the main trunk, as there is no treatment to restore the tree to health.

 

Rot Diseases

Fungal attacks of roots are called root rot, while attacks on the tree trunk just above the soil line are called butt rot. Root rot and butt rot both cause foliage of "Emerald Green" arborvitae to turn brown. Caused by several different types of fungus, but having the same result, affected trees die from these diseases. Avoid rot diseases by planting "Emerald Green" arborvitae in well-drained soil and do not overwater. Prevent injury to tree roots and trunk by mulching and protecting from mechanical damage from lawn mowers or other equipment.

Blight

Fungal pathogens attack young twigs and kill foliage or branchlets. Twig blight is caused by Kabatina thujae or Phomopsis juniperovora. Both of these diseases cause browning of twigs and the presence of small, fruiting bodies. Treatment includes mancozeb to protect foliage, and the application of thiophate methyl on new growth to prevent the spread of disease pathogens. Remove and destroy affected branches. Pestalotiopsis affects twig tips, evidenced by tiny, fruiting structures on twigs. Avoid stress due to drought or injury and apply copper to protect foliage when symptoms are present.

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14 hours ago, drtreelove said:

Welcome free123, You may want to know also about the Plants, Pets and Vets forum, which is a little more oriented to landscape plants, more so than farming. 

 

I have not seen the Thuja plants you ask about, but that doesn't mean they can't be found.  I encourage you to look at other possibillities for your hedge; plants that have been tried and true for local conditions.   It's always risky to create a mono-culture of plants of any kind, but to use an unknown species that haven't been established as suitable for the climate and local pest and disease conditions, is taking a big chance with your investment and possible disappointment. 

 

I don't know Thuja occidentalis 'Brabant' which appears to be a UK favorite, but I have worked with other Thuja varieties quite a bit in California USA, including the 'Emerald Green' cultivar of Thuja occidentalis , which appears similar. The parent species of both cultivars is native to eastern Canada and notheastern US, a temperate climate.  I would not expect them to do well here in a tropical monsoon climate. And you could find that they are susceptible to local pest and disease issues. Pest and disease management may require heavy use of pesticides. But I'm not sure. 

 

Even in California, the Emerald Green arborvitaes get a host of problems that I have been called on to try and control: 

Insect Pests

The cypress tip miner (Argyresthia cupressella) attacks "Emerald Green" arborvitaes on the West Coast where female moths lay eggs on the tips of branches. Larvae feed on the needles throughout winter, causing foliage to yellow and turn brown. The green color is generally restored during the growing season. Webs and cocoons on arborvitae, with silvery tan moths flying out when you shake branches, are evidence of the presence of this insect pest. Control by cutting out branches with heavy infestations or spray in springtime with an acephate-containing insecticide.

Canker Disease

Canker diseases cause foliage to wilt and turn yellow or brown. A resinous oozing from bark of infected branches is often present during canker attack. Cytospora canker causes reddish brown cankers and sunken places in the bark. Prune out diseased branches, cutting back to healthy tissue. Fertilize plants lightly to promote healthy growth, but avoid heavy fertilization, which can cause susceptibility to disease. You must destroy plants infected with cankers on the main trunk, as there is no treatment to restore the tree to health.

 

Rot Diseases

Fungal attacks of roots are called root rot, while attacks on the tree trunk just above the soil line are called butt rot. Root rot and butt rot both cause foliage of "Emerald Green" arborvitae to turn brown. Caused by several different types of fungus, but having the same result, affected trees die from these diseases. Avoid rot diseases by planting "Emerald Green" arborvitae in well-drained soil and do not overwater. Prevent injury to tree roots and trunk by mulching and protecting from mechanical damage from lawn mowers or other equipment.

Blight

Fungal pathogens attack young twigs and kill foliage or branchlets. Twig blight is caused by Kabatina thujae or Phomopsis juniperovora. Both of these diseases cause browning of twigs and the presence of small, fruiting bodies. Treatment includes mancozeb to protect foliage, and the application of thiophate methyl on new growth to prevent the spread of disease pathogens. Remove and destroy affected branches. Pestalotiopsis affects twig tips, evidenced by tiny, fruiting structures on twigs. Avoid stress due to drought or injury and apply copper to protect foliage when symptoms are present.

 

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14 hours ago, drtreelove said:

Welcome free123, You may want to know also about the Plants, Pets and Vets forum, which is a little more oriented to landscape plants, more so than farming. 

 

I have not seen the Thuja plants you ask about, but that doesn't mean they can't be found.  I encourage you to look at other possibillities for your hedge; plants that have been tried and true for local conditions.   It's always risky to create a mono-culture of plants of any kind, but to use an unknown species that haven't been established as suitable for the climate and local pest and disease conditions, is taking a big chance with your investment and possible disappointment. 

 

I don't know Thuja occidentalis 'Brabant' which appears to be a UK favorite, but I have worked with other Thuja varieties quite a bit in California USA, including the 'Emerald Green' cultivar of Thuja occidentalis , which appears similar. The parent species of both cultivars is native to eastern Canada and notheastern US, a temperate climate.  I would not expect them to do well here in a tropical monsoon climate. And you could find that they are susceptible to local pest and disease issues. Pest and disease management may require heavy use of pesticides. But I'm not sure. 

 

Even in California, the Emerald Green arborvitaes get a host of problems that I have been called on to try and control: 

Insect Pests

The cypress tip miner (Argyresthia cupressella) attacks "Emerald Green" arborvitaes on the West Coast where female moths lay eggs on the tips of branches. Larvae feed on the needles throughout winter, causing foliage to yellow and turn brown. The green color is generally restored during the growing season. Webs and cocoons on arborvitae, with silvery tan moths flying out when you shake branches, are evidence of the presence of this insect pest. Control by cutting out branches with heavy infestations or spray in springtime with an acephate-containing insecticide.

Canker Disease

Canker diseases cause foliage to wilt and turn yellow or brown. A resinous oozing from bark of infected branches is often present during canker attack. Cytospora canker causes reddish brown cankers and sunken places in the bark. Prune out diseased branches, cutting back to healthy tissue. Fertilize plants lightly to promote healthy growth, but avoid heavy fertilization, which can cause susceptibility to disease. You must destroy plants infected with cankers on the main trunk, as there is no treatment to restore the tree to health.

 

Rot Diseases

Fungal attacks of roots are called root rot, while attacks on the tree trunk just above the soil line are called butt rot. Root rot and butt rot both cause foliage of "Emerald Green" arborvitae to turn brown. Caused by several different types of fungus, but having the same result, affected trees die from these diseases. Avoid rot diseases by planting "Emerald Green" arborvitae in well-drained soil and do not overwater. Prevent injury to tree roots and trunk by mulching and protecting from mechanical damage from lawn mowers or other equipment.

Blight

Fungal pathogens attack young twigs and kill foliage or branchlets. Twig blight is caused by Kabatina thujae or Phomopsis juniperovora. Both of these diseases cause browning of twigs and the presence of small, fruiting bodies. Treatment includes mancozeb to protect foliage, and the application of thiophate methyl on new growth to prevent the spread of disease pathogens. Remove and destroy affected branches. Pestalotiopsis affects twig tips, evidenced by tiny, fruiting structures on twigs. Avoid stress due to drought or injury and apply copper to protect foliage when symptoms are present.

 

14 hours ago, drtreelove said:

Welcome free123, You may want to know also about the Plants, Pets and Vets forum, which is a little more oriented to landscape plants, more so than farming. 

 

I have not seen the Thuja plants you ask about, but that doesn't mean they can't be found.  I encourage you to look at other possibillities for your hedge; plants that have been tried and true for local conditions.   It's always risky to create a mono-culture of plants of any kind, but to use an unknown species that haven't been established as suitable for the climate and local pest and disease conditions, is taking a big chance with your investment and possible disappointment. 

 

I don't know Thuja occidentalis 'Brabant' which appears to be a UK favorite, but I have worked with other Thuja varieties quite a bit in California USA, including the 'Emerald Green' cultivar of Thuja occidentalis , which appears similar. The parent species of both cultivars is native to eastern Canada and notheastern US, a temperate climate.  I would not expect them to do well here in a tropical monsoon climate. And you could find that they are susceptible to local pest and disease issues. Pest and disease management may require heavy use of pesticides. But I'm not sure. 

 

Even in California, the Emerald Green arborvitaes get a host of problems that I have been called on to try and control: 

Insect Pests

The cypress tip miner (Argyresthia cupressella) attacks "Emerald Green" arborvitaes on the West Coast where female moths lay eggs on the tips of branches. Larvae feed on the needles throughout winter, causing foliage to yellow and turn brown. The green color is generally restored during the growing season. Webs and cocoons on arborvitae, with silvery tan moths flying out when you shake branches, are evidence of the presence of this insect pest. Control by cutting out branches with heavy infestations or spray in springtime with an acephate-containing insecticide.

Canker Disease

Canker diseases cause foliage to wilt and turn yellow or brown. A resinous oozing from bark of infected branches is often present during canker attack. Cytospora canker causes reddish brown cankers and sunken places in the bark. Prune out diseased branches, cutting back to healthy tissue. Fertilize plants lightly to promote healthy growth, but avoid heavy fertilization, which can cause susceptibility to disease. You must destroy plants infected with cankers on the main trunk, as there is no treatment to restore the tree to health.

 

Rot Diseases

Fungal attacks of roots are called root rot, while attacks on the tree trunk just above the soil line are called butt rot. Root rot and butt rot both cause foliage of "Emerald Green" arborvitae to turn brown. Caused by several different types of fungus, but having the same result, affected trees die from these diseases. Avoid rot diseases by planting "Emerald Green" arborvitae in well-drained soil and do not overwater. Prevent injury to tree roots and trunk by mulching and protecting from mechanical damage from lawn mowers or other equipment.

Blight

Fungal pathogens attack young twigs and kill foliage or branchlets. Twig blight is caused by Kabatina thujae or Phomopsis juniperovora. Both of these diseases cause browning of twigs and the presence of small, fruiting bodies. Treatment includes mancozeb to protect foliage, and the application of thiophate methyl on new growth to prevent the spread of disease pathogens. Remove and destroy affected branches. Pestalotiopsis affects twig tips, evidenced by tiny, fruiting structures on twigs. Avoid stress due to drought or injury and apply copper to protect foliage when symptoms are present.

Thank you for your reply and for your detailed information... is there any hedge that would grow well in thailand and could grow to a green wall in a short period of time?

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I'm not a good person to ask, because I dislike sheared hedges in preference of natural form and beauty of plants.  But you might start with this discussion, and search this and the Plant/Pets forum:

 

 

 

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Despite what my friend  Drtreelove says, a well trimmed hedge is better than a concrete wall any day, and can help hide a wall also.

I am a big fan of Ixora myself, a bit slow growing but easy to trim and look after (watering basically).

 

For anything like this you might want to wander around public parks / shopping centres until you find something you like.

ixora.jpg

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