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BANGKOK 21 March 2019 02:12
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tom_a

Living In Chiang Rai

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Would anyone like to discuss what brought them to decide on living in northern Thailand and how life has been for them? I've looked at the pictures and seen just how beautiful it is in Chiang Rai and consider each of you very fortunate to be able to wake up to such sights. What are the bonuses and drawbacks for an expat living in Chiang Rai? Is housing costs as reasonable there as the rest of Thailand? What is the daily interaction like for expats? Are the costs of foods and things reasonable? Do you plan on staying there for the rest of your life?

Thanks

Tom

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Would anyone like to discuss what brought them to decide on living in northern Thailand and how life has been for them? I've looked at the pictures and seen just how beautiful it is in Chiang Rai and consider each of you very fortunate to be able to wake up to such sights. What are the bonuses and drawbacks for an expat living in Chiang Rai? Is housing costs as reasonable there as the rest of Thailand? What is the daily interaction like for expats? Are the costs of foods and things reasonable? Do you plan on staying there for the rest of your life?

Thanks

Tom

i came to chaingrai over 20 years ago after doing the rounds in bangkok,pattaya i met my wife here 15 years ago,built a house and 2 kids later i am very happy to spend the rest of my life here in chaingrai.

but dont take my word for it,the only way to find out about anything is to see for yourself

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I have been paying a yearly long visit to Chiang Rai since 1986 and it became my permanent residence 10 years ago. The direct reason was that Koh Samui (my old destination) got electricity that year and lost its innocense. It became very crowded and noisy: Sometimes there were up to hundred people on Chaweng beach (at the same time ! :D:D ).

A friend of mine had met a young lady from Chiang Rai and moved to the north. I followed him. So I came here by coincidence, like everybody else I suppose :D . Karma?

Chiang Rai had a very small and cohesive expat community at that time (I guess about 15 regulars, correct me if I am wrong Soap!).

And two expat bar/restaurants: Canadian Ian's 'Baitong' at Wang Come and Karl Heinz's Bierstube, at present Bo's Place.

The Thai people of Chiang Rai were very friendly and welcoming even if the language barrier made it very difficult to communicate.

It was the time that the bells of the 'samlor' were the only traffic noise and the smell of buffalo droppings the only kind of pollution caused by traffic.

Twice a week an airplane from Bangkok landed at the old airport. Very exciting: It brought some copies of the Bangkok Post. That was almost the only source of information from the 'outside world'.

Chiang Rai changed enormously and so did the expat community :D . Life is almost completely different now.

Telephone, internet, western food, good and modern facilities ....

Visually seen Chiang Rai became westernized. But underneath it is still that good old Chiang Rai which I loved from the beginning.

So I actually expect to stay here until my last and final barbeque.

Limbo :o

To Soap and the other old-timers:

Do you remember the Thai restaurant (now motorcycle shop) at the clocktower where many of us used to eat (with the very muscular owner). He, Khun Sulachai, is as friendly as in the old days and his food is still excellent. I am still a regular in his place. It's now at the Pahonyothin, twenty meters from Pa Korn market.

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I decided to move to Chiang Mai for two reasons:

Santiburi Golfcourse and Waterford Walley Golfcourse.

The rest is a bonus!

:o:D :D

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Thank you to the people who have answered so far. Very nice posts.

Tom

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I have been paying a yearly long visit to Chiang Rai since 1986 and it became my permanent residence 10 years ago. The direct reason was that Koh Samui (my old destination) got electricity that year and lost its innocense. It became very crowded and noisy: Sometimes there were up to hundred people on Chaweng beach (at the same time ! :D:D ).

A friend of mine had met a young lady from Chiang Rai and moved to the north. I followed him. So I came here by coincidence, like everybody else I suppose :D . Karma?

Chiang Rai had a very small and cohesive expat community at that time (I guess about 15 regulars, correct me if I am wrong Soap!).

And two expat bar/restaurants: Canadian Ian's 'Baitong' at Wang Come and Karl Heinz's Bierstube, at present Bo's Place.

The Thai people of Chiang Rai were very friendly and welcoming even if the language barrier made it very difficult to communicate.

It was the time that the bells of the 'samlor' were the only traffic noise and the smell of buffalo droppings the only kind of pollution caused by traffic.

Twice a week an airplane from Bangkok landed at the old airport. Very exciting: It brought some copies of the Bangkok Post. That was almost the only source of information from the 'outside world'.

Chiang Rai changed enormously and so did the expat community :D . Life is almost completely different now.

Telephone, internet, western food, good and modern facilities ....

Visually seen Chiang Rai became westernized. But underneath it is still that good old Chiang Rai which I loved from the beginning.

So I actually expect to stay here until my last and final barbeque.

Limbo :o

To Soap and the other old-timers:

Do you remember the Thai restaurant (now motorcycle shop) at the clocktower where many of us used to eat (with the very muscular owner). He, Khun Sulachai, is as friendly as in the old days and his food is still excellent. I am still a regular in his place. It's now at the Pahonyothin, twenty meters from Pa Korn market.

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I have been paying a yearly long visit to Chiang Rai since 1986 and it became my permanent residence 10 years ago. The direct reason was that Koh Samui (my old destination) got electricity that year and lost its innocense. It became very crowded and noisy: Sometimes there were up to hundred people on Chaweng beach (at the same time ! :D:D ).

A friend of mine had met a young lady from Chiang Rai and moved to the north. I followed him. So I came here by coincidence, like everybody else I suppose :D . Karma?

Chiang Rai had a very small and cohesive expat community at that time (I guess about 15 regulars, correct me if I am wrong Soap!).

And two expat bar/restaurants: Canadian Ian's 'Baitong' at Wang Come and Karl Heinz's Bierstube, at present Bo's Place.

The Thai people of Chiang Rai were very friendly and welcoming even if the language barrier made it very difficult to communicate.

It was the time that the bells of the 'samlor' were the only traffic noise and the smell of buffalo droppings the only kind of pollution caused by traffic.

Twice a week an airplane from Bangkok landed at the old airport. Very exciting: It brought some copies of the Bangkok Post. That was almost the only source of information from the 'outside world'.

Chiang Rai changed enormously and so did the expat community :D . Life is almost completely different now.

Telephone, internet, western food, good and modern facilities ....

Visually seen Chiang Rai became westernized. But underneath it is still that good old Chiang Rai which I loved from the beginning.

So I actually expect to stay here until my last and final barbeque.

Limbo :o

To Soap and the other old-timers:

Do you remember the Thai restaurant (now motorcycle shop) at the clocktower where many of us used to eat (with the very muscular owner). He, Khun Sulachai, is as friendly as in the old days and his food is still excellent. I am still a regular in his place. It's now at the Pahonyothin, twenty meters from Pa Korn market.

Just a little update. I first came to Chiangrai 20 years ago and have been in and out for years and now retired here and still love it as much now as then. I had a Bar come Coffee Shop at the same time as you mention. It was called the Kangaroo Bar and it was directly opposite the Baitong Bar on the other side of the Wangcome(only lasted 11 months as only backpackers as customers then and they drank water). Also another Expat with a Bar was the Cat House of American Mike. He still pops into Chiangrai now and then.

The main thing that bugs me now living here is the Traffic. It takes me 15 minutes to get home when not so long ago 5 mins max.

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Thanks for those that have shared. Is there no one else that would like to share?

Sincerely,

Tom

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I guess I can switch it up abit in my circumstances and tell you what is drawing me to Thailand. My son is graduating from High School in June, and we are putting our home on the markey (cross our fingers it will sell quickly). We hope it sells fairly soon after we list it simply because of the location being just down the street from the hospital and the High Schhol at the end of our short street. There isn't anything really fancy about our home but we just want to simply sell it and pack up a few things, our dogs and cats and rock n rollover to Thailand or the Philippines. Both countries have their perks. The Philippines seems to have a lower cost of living and the cost of maid service is significantly less cost. On Thialands side of the coin, the Scenery attracts and interests me, train travel to other destinations, fishing, from what I've read the Thai people are generally sincere and pleasant, and the cost of living is also fairly low. The interaction between expats in both countries seems positive, but then again, positive attitude in any location makes things seem much better. So, my Australian wife, and my American butt will land on the shores of Thailand the end of this summer under the retirement visa program, and I truly hope to meet some of you and hopefully get to kick back and watch some American Football with you folks too. The worst we could see happening is that we aren't as happy as we think we should be and pack up our marbles and move over the Phillipines and try that out for awhile. To us, just moving around and exploring as much as possible is an opportunity very few really can do, and I'm glad and grateful that we here in this forum are some of the few who can do this journey.

Sincerely,

Tom

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I would love to hear about that too as I am interested. I am just about to make the move. I have a house to take care of. Coming over next year for six months to look things over etc.

skcop51

I sent you a PM. Let me know if you didn't get it (the moderators here can be a little too 'ambitious' sometimes...)

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we are putting our home on the markey (cross our fingers it will sell quickly). We hope it sells fairly soon after we list it simply because of the location being just down the street from the hospital and the High Schhol at the end of our short street. Tom

Hello! Tom. Do you refer to the real estate market in the U.S? We - my husband and I are going to do the same soon. We almost ready to move to Chieng Rai -- hopefully by the end of next year.

O.K. back to WHY chieng rai. I was born and living in Bangkok for over 30 years before I got married and moved to the U.S. When we plan to move back to Thailand some day (that was years ago), we have been visiting cities in the norther region every time we visited Thailand - once a year. One trip we decided to visit Chieng Rai. We stayed at Rim Kok hotel. I woke up in the morning - will never forget that very first moment at Rim Kok river, walked to the pier -- it was so quiet, so beautiful and peaceful. Late morning, I went to downtown to visit Buddhist temples and experience chieng rai's way of life. I walked into one temple, there a couple of monks, 3-4 late middle-age ladies busy with stuff they brought to TUM BOON. They all looked at me, not as a stranger, but with a charming welcoming expression and curiosity. My heart dropped with strange feeling. At that moment I knew it must be Chieng Rai for me. It's her people and her way of life that draws me there.

To be more rationale, Chieng rai seems the most practical for my American husband. It is 45 minutes by plane to Bangkok -- so I can get away from him for a day or two to have good time with my girl friends in Bangkok, or buy stuff that I need, but hard to find in Chieng rai. It is about 3 hrs. driving or taking VIP bus to Chieng Mai where I can get many things-- including western style grocery to spoil my sweet husband. Quite convenient for me. Chieng rai has several good colleges and universities that I may want to apply for a teaching job. Living expense is so low that we can live very comfortably there. Think about having a big bowl of noodle soup for 50 cents. How's that?

Now, how to start. I spent about 4 years searching the Internet to learn about the city as much as I can -- to make sure that Chieng rai has -- how I put it, things that suit our life style. I started looking for the land at the same time. http://www.scb.co.th/website has a link that you may want to look for a place to land. After 4 years of doing research, I bought a foreclosure piece of land to be our final homestead.

I feel so lucky to discover ThaiVisa website and this chieng rai forum. I have learned a lot and gained a lot of useful information from lovely people at this forum. Just ask them. The online community here is really a chieng rai!!! I feel at home every time I read people' s blogs, ask for info., and get help from them.

Anyway, you have to see it yourself. Go visit the city if you have never been there and see for yourself.

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In Chiangrai there are leeches and they suck your blood!!!!!!

Really there are and really they do!!

Chownah

Edited by chownah

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In Chiangrai there are fireflies that turn a tired walk home, after a hard days work, through the rice fields after sunset into an enchanted affair.

Really there are and really the do!!

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In Chiangrai if you buy the straw from your neighbor's rice crop and delay too long in hauling it home then someone else might just take some of it....or burn it for fun.

Really they might!!

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