Jump to content
BANGKOK

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Dick Crank

Too old for Thailand?

Recommended Posts

14 hours ago, Hummin said:

If I ever get singel at that age, I am going to find a nurse who can take care of me, pay her little bit over average wages, rent her a room in my house, and let her take me to massage and other fysioterapy places for my well being. Call in day care in house ;-) 

 

At least she have to keep me alive and happy to keep her job. 

as above, im 67 and of good health, but if that changes, i can afford to pay a livein nurse{seperate room and bathroom}.

i wouldnt reccommend moving to thailand ,if your health is not so good....better to stay in home country where there will be subsisdised healthcare or assistance..

unfortunately, most of us dont /wont get family support, like thai family give to the elderly...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently building houses here in Hua Hin which are fully designed to be wheel chair friendly and with very low running cost. We have an area for a nurse to live. Cost for care is much cheaper here we would expect to pay around 30k per month for live in nurse. The climate in Thailand is also better for long term health.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have raised some very interesting points in your post.

Having had the joy of working living in Thailand for 30 tears & obviously intermingle with fellow

expats every day I see some who are almost at the "existing stage".

Every person is different but from what I see many as they get older & pretty well given up the tits & bum show viewings  & if their health issues precludes say a golf game once a week many get a bit bitter & grumpy & some who have some disabilities pretty much live in a small apartment alone.

Here is the crunch,,if you are aware of health problems already  unless you have extended Thai family who

you can pretty much guarantee will look after you &  very good medical insurance please think the 

situation through before jumping on a plane back to Land of Smiles.

The place can bite & can be very lonely even when surrounded by masses of people.

On the other hand if you gotta go,,,,u gotta go somewhere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Nancy, for the very useful information and data about ageing and termination (or your choice of euphemism:-).  

 

Does anyone know anywhere in Central or SE Thailand that is anything like McKean?  Or anything like the other more or less luxurious places around Chiang Mai.

 

Thanks for any information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, NancyL said:

you'll see links to documents that list the assisted living facilities near Chiang Mai and their monthly costs. 

Nancy, I could not find any monthly cost in those 3 pages. Either I don’t see well or it’s not there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, NancyL said:

I'm involved with Lanna Care Net, an informal group of expats that assist other expats who have difficulties, usually medical problems in Chiang Mai.  http://www.lannacarenet.org/lessons-learned-at-the-end-of-life/

 

If you look at the page I posted from the LCN website, under "Lesson Two", you'll see links to documents that list the assisted living facilities near Chiang Mai and their monthly costs.  Chiang Mai seems to have better options than other parts of Thailand.  But, all of these facilities are outside the center of town and it's an effort for a resident to come into town to enjoy restaurants or shopping.  It can be done, but I wish there were organized assisted living options right in town, so the residents could easily get to malls and restaurants.

 

I know many western retirees living here who have some degree of a mobility problem.  But, few people come here already disabled.  Usually, they develop the problem after they've been here for time and have had a chance to build their own group of friends and acquaintances who can help or at least put them in touch with potential caregivers.  

 

That being said, foreign retirees who come to rely on assistance from hired caregivers in their home can find themselves very vulnerable to financial exploitation.  Often, they trust a caregiver with their ATM and PIN number to go pay bills and the results can be predictable.  

 

Some retirees have found a good Thai wife and extended family who promise to care for him for the rest of his life at home.  What they don't realize, however, is the difficulty of caring for a large man without special equipment -- the average Thai home isn't handicap friendly.  Also, they usually lack knowledge to cook easy-to-chew and digest food appealing to westerners.  Thai people think that rice porridge is the correct food for old people.

Ive looked at the information in the provided links and thanks for sharing.

I wonder if the people continue to pay their ever increasing health insurance plan on top of those monthly living costs as shown in the care survey grid? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I know it is the mantra on here that an extended Thai family will look after your elderly needs, I want my extended Thai family to be too busy with their own lives to do so as a necessity. With professional care readily available as long as you're willing to pay a reasonable price, I don't see why they should have to except in small doses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other factor with getting old is the increased need for prescription medicines.

As I recently mentioned on these pages, my Australian purchased medicine has now finished, and I'm paying over the counter prices in Chiang Mai.  My medicines bill has jumped from $28 per month to $135.00.

With a 20% drop in the exchange rate of Thai Baht to Oz$ over recent years, it's certainly getting me worried.

As for mobility, the 8 to 10inch drop-offs from path to road makes it impossible for wheel chairs, leg disabilities, walking sticks to climb down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Dick Crank said:

How do you cope with necessities, cooking, daily tasks? Is it easy to hire assistants for that sort of thing and how much does that kind of help cost?

Yes. My friend is 72 and has a long time carer and sexual partener who he pays.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, masuk said:

One other factor with getting old is the increased need for prescription medicines.

As I recently mentioned on these pages, my Australian purchased medicine has now finished, and I'm paying over the counter prices in Chiang Mai.  My medicines bill has jumped from $28 per month to $135.00.

With a 20% drop in the exchange rate of Thai Baht to Oz$ over recent years, it's certainly getting me worried.

As for mobility, the 8 to 10inch drop-offs from path to road makes it impossible for wheel chairs, leg disabilities, walking sticks to climb down.

Yes.

 

I found it very difficult to get about in my last few months in Thailand.

 

I was also worried about the level of medical expertise and,as it turns out,I had every right to be.

 

The hot and humid weather meant that I tended to stay in an air conditioned room all day.Whereas now I live in a temperate part of the east coast of New South Wales,Australia.

 

I was none to sure about my Thai family either and became rather wary about the constant proclamations that the Thai always looked after the elderly.Some did and some did not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trouble with most posters on this topic is they have foolishly burnt their bridges with their more affluent home land. Now as they grow older and the party days are a distant memory, the reality and fear are coming home to roost. Never burn your bridges 6 months about is the ideal situation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I came to Thailand at age 62 knowing that some long term health problems would become a problem eventually.  I knew I couldn't rely on any family care in my own country (all deceased or living elsewhere) and  the only prospect for me, when I got to the stage of needing full time care, was entering the death zone - otherwise known as a nursing home. In Australia these abominations have become less about care for the elderly, more about owner's profit. I watched my mother slowly deteriorate, living on an oxygen machine, in one for years. At one stage she told me she hadn't showered for days because she didn't want the staff, a male, North African migrant, to wash her!  She later died after falling in the bathroom and lying on the tiles for hours waiting for help.

Western countries are more wheelchair friendly, but if you are past the stage of wheeling around the streets chasing a social life, the western death camps can be depressing.

My plan was to find a good Thai lady to live with on the understanding that she would look after me whatever may come, and in return she would inherit all my assets upon my demise. (I have bank accounts and income from several pension funds in Australia) She is aware she will be considerably well off eventually. She is 17 years younger. Our relationship is much more than just this agreement.

My income comfortably covers everything we need, including household, her family and whatever else she requires. It also covers my significant hospital and medication bills.  I have bought a house, car, bikes, furniture, etc, all in her name.  I do have legal tenure for life. 

In 2013, sooner than expected,  I had a major health crisis which left me bedridden for months and now, for nearly five years, in a wheelchair. For a while my lady had to wipe my arse and powder me, etc. (Not pleasant, but infinitely preferable to taking a high dive! That's only for people who have died mentally!)

Now approaching my 70th birthday I'm able to look after all my own personal needs and, although not readily able to scoot around the streets or bars, am quite happy with my lot.

When I came here I was already using a cane to walk and found high curbs and steps difficult to negotiate. Then, as now, in a chair, I found places I could access easily. They do exist in Thailand. When out and about, others look at restaurants for what it offers gastronomically, I look at the access to see if it's worth a visit. There are many westerners in wheelchairs here leading active lives. 

My world here now mainly revolves around internet TV, or sitting outside in our exotic garden with the view of mountains, farmland, buffalo and the occasional elephant wandering by. Sure beats playing bingo in a depressing asylum back home. 

If I deteriorate to the stage where I need complete nursing care, I would consider somewhere like the facility in CM to live out my days. It would be my lady's decision on whether I go there or stay at home in her care.

I know of two single men in their 80's living on Phuket who have young carers looking after them. Not sure of salary, but in the region of 20,000. I believe one has been promised the house when he goes.

My current social life consists of hospital (and Immigration) visits, with only very occasional restaurant meals. A couple of mates are coming up from Australia in the next few days to help celebrate the birthday. No doubt my medical situation will be set back somewhat.

All in all I'm much happier and  better off here, although I do have the resources to cover all eventualities. It's for individuals to assess what is the best option for themselves. It's not one size fits all. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes.
 
I found it very difficult to get about in my last few months in Thailand.
 
I was also worried about the level of medical expertise and,as it turns out,I had every right to be.
 
The hot and humid weather meant that I tended to stay in an air conditioned room all day.Whereas now I live in a temperate part of the east coast of New South Wales,Australia.
 
I was none to sure about my Thai family either and became rather wary about the constant proclamations that the Thai always looked after the elderly.Some did and some did not.
Thank you for this practical and honest post. Certainly food for thought.

Sent from my BLL-L22 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Odysseus123 said:

<snip>

I was also worried about the level of medical expertise and,as it turns out,I had every right to be.

<snip2>

Well I've been here almost 15 years and I am a little envious of you guys who know so much more about the Thai medical system than I do because -- unlike yourselves -- I have had next to no first-hand exposure to the Thai medical system except one orthopedic surgery that went quite well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I came to Thailand at age 62 knowing that some long term health problems would become a problem eventually.  I knew I couldn't rely on any family care in my own country (all deceased or living elsewhere) and  the only prospect for me, when I got to the stage of needing full time care, was entering the death zone - otherwise known as a nursing home. In Australia these abominations have become less about care for the elderly, more about owner's profit. I watched my mother slowly deteriorate, living on an oxygen machine, in one for years. At one stage she told me she hadn't showered for days because she didn't want the staff, a male, North African migrant, to wash her!  She later died after falling in the bathroom and lying on the tiles for hours waiting for help.
Western countries are more wheelchair friendly, but if you are past the stage of wheeling around the streets chasing a social life, the western death camps can be depressing.
My plan was to find a good Thai lady to live with on the understanding that she would look after me whatever may come, and in return she would inherit all my assets upon my demise. (I have bank accounts and income from several pension funds in Australia) She is aware she will be considerably well off eventually. She is 17 years younger. Our relationship is much more than just this agreement.
My income comfortably covers everything we need, including household, her family and whatever else she requires. It also covers my significant hospital and medication bills.  I have bought a house, car, bikes, furniture, etc, all in her name.  I do have legal tenure for life. 
In 2013, sooner than expected,  I had a major health crisis which left me bedridden for months and now, for nearly five years, in a wheelchair. For a while my lady had to wipe my arse and powder me, etc. (Not pleasant, but infinitely preferable to taking a high dive! That's only for people who have died mentally!)
Now approaching my 70th birthday I'm able to look after all my own personal needs and, although not readily able to scoot around the streets or bars, am quite happy with my lot.
When I came here I was already using a cane to walk and found high curbs and steps difficult to negotiate. Then, as now, in a chair, I found places I could access easily. They do exist in Thailand. When out and about, others look at restaurants for what it offers gastronomically, I look at the access to see if it's worth a visit. There are many westerners in wheelchairs here leading active lives. 
My world here now mainly revolves around internet TV, or sitting outside in our exotic garden with the view of mountains, farmland, buffalo and the occasional elephant wandering by. Sure beats playing bingo in a depressing asylum back home. 
If I deteriorate to the stage where I need complete nursing care, I would consider somewhere like the facility in CM to live out my days. It would be my lady's decision on whether I go there or stay at home in her care.
I know of two single men in their 80's living on Phuket who have young carers looking after them. Not sure of salary, but in the region of 20,000. I believe one has been promised the house when he goes.
My current social life consists of hospital (and Immigration) visits, with only very occasional restaurant meals. A couple of mates are coming up from Australia in the next few days to help celebrate the birthday. No doubt my medical situation will be set back somewhat.
All in all I'm much happier and  better off here, although I do have the resources to cover all eventualities. It's for individuals to assess what is the best option for themselves. It's not one size fits all. 
Thank you for your post. Many of us will be in a similar situation at some point. I am pleased your health improved.

Sent from my BLL-L22 using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...