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puukao

How can schools keep farangs from leaving?

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I will type this fast, so please bash my ghrahmarraer.  Thanks in advance.

 

1.  i don't think more money will keep a farang, maybe one more year.  5-10k baht more per month isn't much, but i know that's relative.  if you really want more money, go back home.  we know this.  

2.  better lunches?  

3.  less hours, less than 18 i think would keep some more

4.  only need to be at school for teaching, not to sit around or help with other stuff

5.  IF they want to be at school and help with other stuff, GREAT!!  But not mandatory

6.  longer contracts with less chance of a school breaking the contract

7.  private office, or private space...

8.  more help in the classroom

9.  better computers

10.  more control over curriculum...

 

????

 

OK< that was fast.

 

I've seen about 15 farangs leave in one year, and it's super rare anyone stays longer than 1 year.  

 

Any thoughts on how to keep farangs from leaving?

 

if good feedback, i will advise my school.  

 

 

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Lock the doors?

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My first question would be, are the farangs needed?

 

When it's nice to have farangs but not neccessary, then nothing needs to be changed.

 

When they are really needed, then I guess easier work-permit and probably more money. Especially for the low paid jobs.

On the other side, what are the teachers expecting?

  1. My guess is, that some only want try to be somewhere else for 1-2 year and they then happy go back home, for this there is nothing to change as they not want stay longer.
  2. Then I think there are some teachers which needs the money (don't know how good they really are in their jobs) and this teachers not leaving by themselves they are happy to have a job.
  3. And then there are the good teachers, which only leaves if they can find a even better job. As they have the qualifications and really know the teaching stuff. They mostly already work at a good school with a good salary for Thailand.

 

Why you not asked some of the 15 farangs, why they left? I think this would be the best to know the real reasons.

 

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Good initial point, change the pedagogy, make it much more student centered / student active, and quickly re-educate Thai teachers to understand and use the methods, and make it compulsory.

 

Reduce class size, max ever 30, less better.

 

Deliberately have some foreign teachers, (some, not the numbers currently seen), but on a different basis, look at school rankings across the world in terms of further innovations etc, and invite teachers from these institutions, perhaps one year or even 1 semester, perhaps video tape their lessons for further analysis and implementation.

 

Have a team / committee do the above (not controlled form within the Ed. Ministry) and same team / committee responsible to build models of teacher training from the countries who always rank highly, etc., etc. 

 

Every year conduct competitions to select very bright kids who want to be teachers to study a teaching degree abroad and then use and share their learning at home.

 

Without large scale decentralization not much will change. Decentralize and push schools to compete with each other, reward schools that innovate new methods, new materials, new equipment. And allow kids to register at any school, anywhere.

 

Surround every school director with a continuous 24 hr audit team (not from within the ed. ministry), and continuously change the team make-up every 6 months with new staffing, with comprehensive 6 months reporting to a corruption watch-dog. 

 

 

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On 6/16/2018 at 9:18 AM, puukao said:

Any thoughts on how to keep farangs from leaving?

Wanting to hold onto farang teachers simply because they are farang is ridiculous.

 

Maybe thoughts on how to retain well qualified, talented, dedicated, effective farang teachers and  cull the useless space-fillers would be worth discussing. Most likely a high percentage of those who leave, especially after serving only one year, aren't worth bothering about and came here because they thought it would be a good way to have a cheap holiday.

 

On 6/16/2018 at 9:18 AM, puukao said:

2.  better lunches?  

4.  only need to be at school for teaching, not to sit around or help with other stuff

5.  IF they want to be at school and help with other stuff, GREAT!!  But not mandatory

Lunches and stuff. The main concerns of dedicated teachers world-wide.

 

Maybe add in lockers to store beach gear.

 

 

 

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1. Identify quality teachers.

2. Identify Quality students (i.e., self-motivated)

3. Match them and do not waste a quality teacher's time with poor quality or disinterested students.

4. Use your quality teachers wisely and do not burden them with futile tasks.

 

 

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It could be the recruitment process and criteria. If they allowed older expats that do not have degree's but do have ties to Thailand and the community plus common sense with life long experiences,  these people would probably  stay year after year.. Seems stupid that there is ample untapped teacher material that is just cast aside because of age or doesn't have Bachelor's degree.

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Hi there,Very many of Farang teachers come here for a certain stay for own international experience as well as to learn the job and culture of different countries.I just have experience of Kajon Kiet School in Phuket where my grand daughter was on the mixed program.First of all farang English speaking teachers are a must if the children are to learn good English! This is a win-win situation för Thailand as well as the teachers.I do not think it so mych a question about salary or other thing.The teachers I know are definitely not working 18 hours not even 12 normally 8am to  5-7 pm.

As to International schools it is quite of different situation,they have to go according to thei curiculum and thus teachers need to be of high standar ( I suppose,dont know)

What we do need is very skilled English speaking teacher (with native Englisg or western standar exellent Enflish) WE NEED THEM TO THAI SCHOOLS! With Thai program. I can see within my Thai family,kids that even studied at university level have very poor English in reading and speaking the language as they have often had Thai teachers.We even know that Thais have difficulties with som letters even in their own languange. Then again I think it would be a very good idea to use our retired expacts with exellent knowledge in English writing,reading and spoken proper English English or American dito without any special accents.Today age of Westerners is not same as before.As long as a person wishes to work and can do the job good why should age be a hinder?

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There is several problems in your analysis that needs to be mentioned first. 

 

1) There are several English Speaking Countries who have Experienced Teachers, all willing to work for a lower wage, longer hours, and don't care about school lunches. The Philippines and Nigeria are just two of them. 

 

2) At what level of education and training do you need to teach High School Students in Thailand a few classes a week? I venture to say that many of the English Teachers employed now, have very little teaching experience or actual training. 

 

3) The real solution to this English Learning Problem for Thailand isn't to hire more Farang English Teachers by paying them more money, with less hours and more benefits. The real solution is to teach the teachers the English Language, and pay them better for learning that.   

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One problem is that many of these teachers aren't leaving or changing schools of their own accord.

 

Often the best teachers are also the ones vocal in their concerns about school policy and teaching methods.

They care about the students enough to raise concerns about rote learning, huge class sizes, forced haircuts, ridiculous pomp and ceremony etc.

 

Then the schools don't renew their contracts because they don't fit the system. In a sense, they're fired.

 

Thai school administrators are not interested as much about good quality teachers as they are about teachers not making waves.

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I think there is one point you are overlooking. What is the incentive for the school to keep a farang teacher? You, I should say we, are easily replaced. You say you have seen 15 teachers leave. We're all of them replaced within a week or two? 

 

As long as teachers are willing to put up with low pay and crappy conditions, schools will continue on the current path.

 

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15 minutes ago, GOLDBUGGY said:

There is several problems in your analysis that needs to be mentioned first. 

 

1) There are several English Speaking Countries who have Experienced Teachers, all willing to work for a lower wage, longer hours, and don't care about school lunches. The Philippines and Nigeria are just two of them. 

 

2) At what level of education and training do you need to teach High School Students in Thailand a few classes a week? I venture to say that many of the English Teachers employed now, have very little teaching experience or actual training. 

 

3) The real solution to this English Learning Problem for Thailand isn't to hire more Farang English Teachers by paying them more money, with less hours and more benefits. The real solution is to teach the teachers the English Language, and pay them better for learning that.   

I have worked along side quite a few fantastic Filipino teachers here. But they were always asking me to proofread their tests or lesson plans and also asking "how do I pronounce this or this"

Thai English teachers the same questions.

 

Native English speakers should be a valued resource in Thai schools.

 

ps. I can barely understand a word a Nigerian says.

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1 hour ago, baansgr said:

It could be the recruitment process and criteria. If they allowed older expats that do not have degree's but do have ties to Thailand and the community plus common sense with life long experiences,  these people would probably  stay year after year.. Seems stupid that there is ample untapped teacher material that is just cast aside because of age or doesn't have Bachelor's degree.

You have hit the proverbial nail on the head sir.

My 9 year old nephew is in a Thai government school here in Phichit, he has had English lessons from a Cameroonian teacher for the last year,  and after a year he only just knows his alphabet and cannot differentiate between capital and lower case letters. There are thousands of retired expats living throughout the country who may be willing to sit with a small group of interested students in order to practice that English the Thai teachers have "taught" them. Many can do this as they are in small villages where everyone knows everyone else. Having a Thai teach pronunciation is akin to having a farang try to teach Thai . With the exception of a few truly talented farang Thai speakers like Andrew Biggs.

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I've been teaching for over 13 years now and and one thing that most schools do which I disapprove of is the 1-year contract. Is there a reason a teacher cannot just get hired?

 

I finally have a teaching job now, after working the trenches for so long, which is professional. I have a job, there is no contract and nothing to get signed year after year at the owner's whim. 

 

The last school I worked at got overrun by Filipinos. Generally, their English abilities were substandard. Their grammar was tragic and their pronunciation was poor.

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14 minutes ago, bkkgriz said:

I think there is one point you are overlooking. What is the incentive for the school to keep a farang teacher? You, I should say we, are easily replaced. You say you have seen 15 teachers leave. We're all of them replaced within a week or two? 

 

As long as teachers are willing to put up with low pay and crappy conditions, schools will continue on the current path.

 

The answer is continuity.

When the foreigner stays several years it provides stability and continuity of their lesson plans, relationship with students, and relationship with fellow teachers and administration.

The revolving door of teachers is a chaotic mess and the students go back to step one with every new teacher.

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