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BANGKOK 25 March 2019 04:24
puukao

How can schools keep farangs from leaving?

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1 hour ago, ozmeldo said:

Starting a new job in a foreign country. Entirely untested and you will make big mistakes your first three terms - far more if you're not really interested or taking what you are doing seriously.

 

Everyone makes what they are worth. The only exception is the guy stuck in Issan with a family that he can't move and those on a fourth waiver.

 

I now have come to the conclusion that teachers  that accept 30-40k wages is because that's all they'd be making in their home countries

 

That's  below minimum wage in my home country so NO.

Edited by duanebigsby

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On 6/18/2018 at 8:03 PM, otherstuff1957 said:

Most schools call their foreign teachers "teachers" and their Thai teachers "kru or ajarn".  It's easy and clear.

 

There actually is a polite word for foreigner in Thai.  It is khon tang chat or khon tang prathet. 

Because they're speaking English to the foreign teachers and Thai to the Thai teachers.

The same way at gate duty they say "sawatdee" to Thai teachers and "good morning " to foreign teachers.

Farang is not an impolite word unless the context is impolite.

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Common sense. The only thing that can keep them here, too bad you can't buy it at 7/11. ?

Edited by SpeedFreakz
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On 6/17/2018 at 8:08 PM, Rhys said:

... it is their system and they will muck it up the way they want, the way will, not much else.. deal with it the best you can.  Start with MOE  TTC...

 

The TCT, or Khurusapha, would be a great place without the guy in his white gloves. I haven't seen him in February and will hopefully not meet him next month. 

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7 hours ago, thequietman said:

Listening  would be top of my list. The Thai faculty don't listen or just don't care.

 

Got my new schedule for the Uni I lecture in yesterday. I told them I work online in the evenings many times but they still have me teaching from 7pm to 9pm and 5pm to 7pm. 

Where do they get off actually suggesting these times. I never agreed to these times at interview and according to Thai labour law, I don't have to work these hours.

However, they don't care and it looks like I am going to have to resign.

Same crap, different school and so it goes around and around, not listening and not caring.

 

...what did you decide,  leaving?   Facing a similar situation...approached and volutold I would teach the GEN ED Freshman  RETREADS.. in the evening.. you know the kind, can't live without my cell phone, talks while you are teaching; the jumper, late arrivals, failed the course x 2 plus, and poorly motivated students.. leaving too...

Edited by Rhys
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Oh and just further to that:

Language / Manners - Often Thai people will say "You must...", but in English we don't actually say that very often when talking to employees.  Instead of telling employees to do something, we will ask them to do it, and when it comes from the boss it's basically an instruction/order, but it is phrased as a question to be polite i.e. You must come to the meeting at 3pm vs Are you able to come to a meeting at 3pm? Or Can you come to a meeting a 3pm?  This significantly changes the feeling of the instruction and gives an opportunity for valid reasons to be raised on why they might not be able to come "i.e. I have to pick my son up from school at that time" when otherwise teachers might feel that they are placed in a very uncomfortable situation, when actually they don't "have" to go to the meeting, especially as it'll be entirely in Thai and not even the Thai staff will be asked for an opinion let alone the Farang staff, as it's really just a meeting to pander to the director's ego.  The difference is really just a miscommunication, as in Thai they would use "Dong", which directly translates to must/have to.

 

Oh and if "Must" is going to be used, then don't send some 25 year old administrative assistant to tell Farang teachers what they "Must" do, as the only time that an order like that is really appropriate is if it comes from someone who does have some version of seniority/authority else it's on the verge of demeaning.  It'd be like a student telling the teacher that they're in trouble lol.

Edited by SlyAnimal

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I have some friends who teach and work with many Africans and Filipinos.  They get along well, but they get a little frustrated when they hear certain phrases spoken to young children that would really make zero sense in the UK (or America, Canada, etc...).  The accent seems to be a problem for the director, and maybe a non-Native teacher should just focus on different strengths.  I'm not sure, clearly it's either to save money or there just aren't enough Native teachers to fill the roles.

 

Everyone knows everyone's salary, but I don't care if they know I make 2 or 3x what they make.  I used to tell some teachers, "If i get fired, you don't make more money." and "If I leave, the next Native teacher is getting the money and not going to give you money."  LOL.  Only a few friends I can talk to like this and we laugh...

 

another HUGE thing I forgot (I think):
 

1.  Other farangs who drag in their problems and complain to other farangs..

 

this can really get farangs out of the school.  Who wants to listen to some person complain all day and make being in the same room with them miserable......

 

let's not kid ourselves. the farangs who come to Thailand and work (and don't work, actually) are sometimes not the most stable individuals without some weird drinking/sex fetish that must be explained as they beg for 30 baht and then wonder why life has beat them down....

 

 

 

 

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59 minutes ago, puukao said:

I have some friends who teach and work with many Africans and Filipinos.  They get along well, but they get a little frustrated when they hear certain phrases spoken to young children that would really make zero sense in the UK (or America, Canada, etc...).  The accent seems to be a problem for the director, and maybe a non-Native teacher should just focus on different strengths.  I'm not sure, clearly it's either to save money or there just aren't enough Native teachers to fill the roles.

 

Everyone knows everyone's salary, but I don't care if they know I make 2 or 3x what they make.  I used to tell some teachers, "If i get fired, you don't make more money." and "If I leave, the next Native teacher is getting the money and not going to give you money."  LOL.  Only a few friends I can talk to like this and we laugh...

 

another HUGE thing I forgot (I think):
 

1.  Other farangs who drag in their problems and complain to other farangs..

 

this can really get farangs out of the school.  Who wants to listen to some person complain all day and make being in the same room with them miserable......

 

let's not kid ourselves. the farangs who come to Thailand and work (and don't work, actually) are sometimes not the most stable individuals without some weird drinking/sex fetish that must be explained as they beg for 30 baht and then wonder why life has beat them down....

 

 

 

 

What do you mean with weird sex fetish? ladyboys? But to get back on topic, it helps a lot when the Thai teachers are talking to the foreigners in a way that they show respect. And not calling a foreigner "Farang" in a very bad tone.

 

  I've never experienced something similar before, the current Thai staff at my school do not seem to be interested in talking to any of us.

 

  That could be through too many people coming and be going, because of an agency. But you'd at least expect that they communicate with some "long-stayers." 

 

  IMHO, if the Thai teachers talk bad about foreigners how should the students respect them?

 

  Thai teachers who appreciate working with foreigners who are honest seems to be very important to me. Young Thais should wai older foreigners first, not vice versa. 

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What do you mean with weird sex fetish? ladyboys? But to get back on topic, it helps a lot when the Thai teachers are talking to the foreigners in a way that they show respect. And not calling a foreigner "Farang" in a very bad tone.

 

  I've never experienced something similar before, the current Thai staff at my school do not seem to be interested in talking to any of us.

 

  That could be through too many people coming and be going, because of an agency. But you'd at least expect that they communicate with some "long-stayers." 

 

  IMHO, if the Thai teachers talk bad about foreigners how should the students respect them?

 

  Thai teachers who appreciate working with foreigners who are honest seems to be very important to me. Young Thais should wai older foreigners first, not vice versa. 

As you know, I’ve been around a while but have no ‘respect’ problems with students. I think some times you get what you deserve!

It must be remembered that to some Thai teachers, we are worrisome as their speaking skills are below par. Some have ‘questionable’ degrees/doctorates from places like India but have no ‘indian’ accents! To me there is only one reason for that!!!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I've never had any problems with teachers speaking negatively about our Farang teachers.  Sometimes they have been a bit jealous of the fact that our starting salaries are on par with what a teacher with 10-15 years experience makes, even if it's our first job teaching, and then we refuse to do a lot of the administrative duties that are mandatory for the Thai teachers.

However, aside from those (Which are legitimate gripes), I haven't heard anything negative, and generally find the atmosphere to be pretty positive.  Admittedly though, only 3 teachers in my department have been at the school for longer, so I've earnt my stripes.

Never had a problem with other Farang sharing their problems, everyone has their frustrations that they need to vent, and often by sharing them the teachers do get to know each other better, which can help the working relationship.  If someone repeatedly does really dumb things, or things that make you uncomfortable for whatever reason, then you're getting to know them and finding out that they perhaps aren't the type of person you want to associate with, but that's life.

Although if you more just mean teachers with a positive attitude, as opposed to negative attitudes, then I agree completely.  As there are some people who dwell too much on their problems and are constantly depressed, who always see the glass as half empty.  This can at times be infectious and create a less enjoyable workplace, but it works in the reverse too, where lots of positive energy can feed off each other and make for a much more positive and enjoyable workplace as well.

In general, I think that most of the things which will keep foreigners at a school, are much less reliant on the director approving in contracts etc, but rather just general improvements to respect and communication within the foreigner's department.

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On 6/30/2018 at 5:15 PM, thequietman said:

Listening  would be top of my list. The Thai faculty don't listen or just don't care.

 

Got my new schedule for the Uni I lecture in yesterday. I told them I work online in the evenings many times but they still have me teaching from 7pm to 9pm and 5pm to 7pm. 

Where do they get off actually suggesting these times. I never agreed to these times at interview and according to Thai labour law, I don't have to work these hours.

However, they don't care and it looks like I am going to have to resign.

Same crap, different school and so it goes around and around, not listening and not caring.

 

They may listen but I'm sure what they are thinking is that you are arrogant. They have employed you; you signed an employment contract; they provide your visa and work permit, but you complain that they won't rearrange classes, and hence the whole university teaching schedule, for you so that you can teach online for another company/school (without the appropriate listing in your work permit for this work).

 

Where does it say in Thai Labor Law that you don't have to work these hours? I'm interested as this will close down all language school's if true.

 

 

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