Jump to content
BANGKOK 23 July 2019 19:54

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

joninisaan

Punishment for students

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, joninisaan said:

Thanks for the advice. Ill use especially the "stop and look at them" one. I like that one because the misbehaving student will probably not sure what you're really thinking or going to do which makes it work.

If you've got the troublemakers on your side, you control the class. 

 

   Once they find out that you're not an idiot, they'll change their strange behavior. It's like a power play. My Karma got me and all I did to my teachers came back to me now.

Make fun of them if they misbehave that the others start laughing. That's also very helpful, but never call a student a buffalo. The worst word to call a Thai. 

   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/24/2018 at 3:44 AM, ozmeldo said:

It's not about public vs private schools. The best schools, the most in demand outside IB, International (real ones) are 2-3 bilinguals ate PUBLIC schools + then a tiny few Christian, a few more Catholic schools then there are public's or what we might term public/private's eg Pathumwan Demonstration. These are the elite secondary schools. 

 

Who wants to go to a private university in Thailand? No decent student.

 

The top ten secondary schools are essentially all or nearly all public.

 

When kids take a call in class, I point them outside. Video games, one warning, I'll take their phone for 24 hours. Loud talking, I try to mitigate. Sleeping, sometimes I take them, sometimes not. Depends, I know many are up late studying and up early to get to school.

 

Ill pull them into the activity and disallow other work to be done in class.

 

Connecting personally with students goes a long way. If they respect you, that might not get you to the goal line, but it will take you far.

         Thanks for ideas that you use. I do take away their phones but give them back when class is over as my Thai wife who is also a teacher said that now some Thai teachers are starting to be discouraged from taking students phones as some parents complain that its considered stealing even though teachers give the phone back. May not be a case for me but I don't want to take chances.

         Back in my home town Hawaii where I was working in a high school, I would work with the worst students in school (drug users, in and out of detention homes, behavior disorders, etc) but I NEVER had problems with any student as I would give them some respect in which they would give me respect back by not giving me a hard time and being honest with me. But here, I here from a lot of different foreign teachers that here in Thailand, if you "give them an inch, they'll take a mile". 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally I go over the classroom rules at the start of the term, and explain the punishments at the same time.  I find that provided the students know ahead of time what the punishment will be, they will accept the punishment without complaint, and after 1 student in the class has been punished the others will realize that I was being serious.

I only have a pretty narrow spectrum of what I punish though, as I teach in the countryside so it's all about taking small steps.

Cellphone use in class (Unless it's a dictionary) - I'll confiscate their phone for a week.  I don't particularly like looking after phones though, so for the first student to get caught I'll make a song and dance about taking it for a week, then at the end of class will do a coin flip with the student, with heads (the king) returning their phone to them (And I deliberately try to manipulate the toss to ensure I lose).  I also sometimes give the students the choice of 700 lines (100 per day) to get their phone back straight away (For which they are very grateful, since they'd be social outcasts if they couldn't play RoV lol).

Copying homework - For copying homework I give all students involved 500 lines (So both the student copying, and the student who's book they borrowed).

 

Cheating/"Helping" - For students that try to cheat on tests, or who "help" their friends during speaking tests (i.e. Students not being tested saying the answer to a question, just as they do during regular questions in class) I advise the students that they'll receive a minimum of 500 lines, and will also receive 0 on their test as well.  The 0s I usually relent on, and allow a retest or similar after making them sweat for a bit, but do it on a case by case basis.

 

Skipping class - My students need to attend 80%+ of their classes.  If they're excused I don't factor that in at all, but otherwise will fail them if they don't attend at least 80% of my classes.  I usually try to calculate this well before I need to submit their grades, so that I can assign them special homework early.  I give them 500 lines for each day that they were absent, if they can complete their lines before x date (usually a date prior to when I need to submit my grades), then I will give them a 50% "discount" on their lines, and the grade that they deserved (rather than 0 or ม.ส. ).  I will also give them a second date, and if they complete their lines before then they can still have the 50% discount (But because their grade will have already been submitted as a fail, I can only change their grade back to a 1).  I also include an attendance section when calculating their grade, usually around 20%, from which I make deductions every time they are late or absent without a valid reason.

 

Failing tests - I usually don't punish students for poor performances in class.  However on tests that are a large contributor to a student's grade, I will give them the opportunity (Which is often compulsory) to test again with a similar test at lunch time.  When I do so, I will usually cap the maximum score of the re-test at 50% (And make students continue to test at lunch time each week until they can achieve 50%). 

Other - I also occasionally give lines to students that do something weird that I feel is inappropriate or rude e.g. I gave 3 girls 200 lines each because they took 20+ minutes in the toilet.

 

Incomplete lines - Students that are given special homework (lines), and don't complete them within 1 week, have the amount doubled.  When I first started doing this, some students mustn't have realized, and so had 200 lines (I wasn't as harsh then) turn into about 4000+ by the end of the term.  They didn't think it was funny anymore when I failed them and refused to change their grade until their work was completed.

But generally anything within the classroom itself I see as just general classroom management and so don't punish students for anything in class, aside from raising my voice or putting people on the spot via a question or similar.  Even when I do raise my voice etc, my goal is to keep the "approval" of the class, so only do so with fair warning (e.g. most of the class know when I'm about to yell, and enjoy seeing the shock/surprise on their friend's face when they get blasted) as I want to stop disruptive behaviour but not scare them too much.

Anywho, that's how I do things, I think that it works well but everyone has their own way of doing things, hope it's of some help.  I teach in the countryside, and it's 8 years since I first started at the school, so might have a bit more free reign than what some other teachers would e.g. I've heard some schools don't let you fail students, or even yell at students.  With limited experience elsewhere I don't know how flexible other school policies are, but I can definitely do both while still maintaining very positive reviews from the school/students, I just have to do it in the right way.

Edit:  Oh and just in hindsight, I should mention.  I do definitely feel that making it clear to students what the consequences of their actions are, BEFORE they break the rules, is really important.  I use what I feel are excessively harsh punishments for what are relatively minor infractions, this gives me a lot of leeway if I want to reduce a punishment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, SlyAnimal said:

Generally I go over the classroom rules at the start of the term, and explain the punishments at the same time.  I find that provided the students know ahead of time what the punishment will be, they will accept the punishment without complaint, and after 1 student in the class has been punished the others will realize that I was being serious.

I only have a pretty narrow spectrum of what I punish though, as I teach in the countryside so it's all about taking small steps.

Cellphone use in class (Unless it's a dictionary) - I'll confiscate their phone for a week.  I don't particularly like looking after phones though, so for the first student to get caught I'll make a song and dance about taking it for a week, then at the end of class will do a coin flip with the student, with heads (the king) returning their phone to them (And I deliberately try to manipulate the toss to ensure I lose).  I also sometimes give the students the choice of 700 lines (100 per day) to get their phone back straight away (For which they are very grateful, since they'd be social outcasts if they couldn't play RoV lol).

Copying homework - For copying homework I give all students involved 500 lines (So both the student copying, and the student who's book they borrowed).

 

Cheating/"Helping" - For students that try to cheat on tests, or who "help" their friends during speaking tests (i.e. Students not being tested saying the answer to a question, just as they do during regular questions in class) I advise the students that they'll receive a minimum of 500 lines, and will also receive 0 on their test as well.  The 0s I usually relent on, and allow a retest or similar after making them sweat for a bit, but do it on a case by case basis.

 

Skipping class - My students need to attend 80%+ of their classes.  If they're excused I don't factor that in at all, but otherwise will fail them if they don't attend at least 80% of my classes.  I usually try to calculate this well before I need to submit their grades, so that I can assign them special homework early.  I give them 500 lines for each day that they were absent, if they can complete their lines before x date (usually a date prior to when I need to submit my grades), then I will give them a 50% "discount" on their lines, and the grade that they deserved (rather than 0 or ม.ส. ).  I will also give them a second date, and if they complete their lines before then they can still have the 50% discount (But because their grade will have already been submitted as a fail, I can only change their grade back to a 1).  I also include an attendance section when calculating their grade, usually around 20%, from which I make deductions every time they are late or absent without a valid reason.

 

Failing tests - I usually don't punish students for poor performances in class.  However on tests that are a large contributor to a student's grade, I will give them the opportunity (Which is often compulsory) to test again with a similar test at lunch time.  When I do so, I will usually cap the maximum score of the re-test at 50% (And make students continue to test at lunch time each week until they can achieve 50%). 

Other - I also occasionally give lines to students that do something weird that I feel is inappropriate or rude e.g. I gave 3 girls 200 lines each because they took 20+ minutes in the toilet.

But generally anything within the classroom itself I see as just general classroom management and so don't punish students for anything in class, aside from raising my voice or putting people on the spot via a question or similar.  Even when I do raise my voice etc, my goal is to keep the "approval" of the class, so only do so with fair warning (e.g. most of the class know when I'm about to yell, and enjoy seeing the shock/surprise on their friend's face when they get blasted) as I want to stop disruptive behaviour but not scare them too much.

Anywho, that's how I do things, I think that it works well but everyone has their own way of doing things, hope it's of some help.  I teach in the countryside, and it's 8 years since I first started at the school, so might have a bit more free reign than what some other teachers would e.g. I've heard some schools don't let you fail students, or even yell at students.  With limited experience elsewhere I don't know how flexible other school policies are, but I can definitely do both while still maintaining very positive reviews from the school/students, I just have to do it in the right way.

Cellphone use in class (Unless it's a dictionary) - I'll confiscate their phone for a week

 

   My friend Lostineeesaan just told me that the rich parents of his students in the EP section would immediately grab his balls and make his voice a bit higher. But he wanted a gender change anyway, so no great loss. ?

 

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, jenny2017 said:

Cellphone use in class (Unless it's a dictionary) - I'll confiscate their phone for a week

 

   My friend Lostineeesaan just told me that the rich parents of his students in the EP section would immediately grab his balls and make his voice a bit higher. But he wanted a gender change anyway, so no great loss. ?

 

  

I don't think I've ever had a parent complain.  I do let students take their sim-card out though, so that they can still call their parents etc if needed.

Thing is though, I usually don't even need to actually take it for a week.  Just saying I'll take the first one for a week, then quietly allowing a coin flip at the end of class to get it back, usually ensures that the rest of the class won't go near their phones in class.

 

If they do lose it for a week though, then they knew what the punishment was and if anything are maybe too ashamed to tell their parents (And I think a lot of parents would have little sympathy for them.  So many of the parents I've spoken to expect us, as teachers, to be making the tough calls).

But I really don't like having to look after their phones for a week.  As I know that if I were to somehow lose it, or break it, it'd cause a huge problem (Unlike when I confiscate mirrors from the ladyboys, who usually don't even bother to ask for them back lol).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, SlyAnimal said:

I don't think I've ever had a parent complain.  I do let students take their sim-card out though, so that they can still call their parents etc if needed.

Thing is though, I usually don't even need to actually take it for a week.  Just saying I'll take the first one for a week, then quietly allowing a coin flip at the end of class to get it back, usually ensures that the rest of the class won't go near their phones in class.

 

If they do lose it for a week though, then they knew what the punishment was and if anything are maybe too ashamed to tell their parents (And I think a lot of parents would have little sympathy for them.  So many of the parents I've spoken to expect us, as teachers, to be making the tough calls).

But I really don't like having to look after their phones for a week.  As I know that if I were to somehow lose it, or break it, it'd cause a huge problem (Unlike when I confiscate mirrors from the ladyboys, who usually don't even bother to ask for them back lol).

 

You are an experienced teacher who knows his job and how to deal with problems that can/will occur, up and down. I was just trying to say that taking phones away would first need the PO's permission and some kids would immediately hate a newbie teacher for doing so. I think that we're all a bit different and it's all about the relationship that does or doesn't exist between the teacher and the student. 

 

If an expensive iPhone would disappear, it would be too easy to blame a foreign teacher for doing so. Enjoy your teaching, I know that you're doing a great job and your advice is always good and true. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try giving them lines to write out.

 

You might also find that the other students are more than happy to give a troublemaker a clip round the back of the head. If a boy is playing up suggest to one of his classmates sitting nearby that he "dob dob" the naughty student and make a hand gesture to indicate a gentle clip round the ear. More likely than not the boys will be delighted to get permission from the teacher to give another boy a clip round the ear. The student who gets clipped round the back of the head won't be happy at this and will think twice before misbehaving again. You're not hitting any students so you're not breaking any laws; and the students are enforcing their own discipline. This deals with the bad behaviour quickly and in a way that looks like fun to most of the class - naturally the student who gets hit by his classmates won't like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mentalcolonization said:

make them your friends , listen to them , get in their fun , then you can achieve your objectives. punishment makes them runaway 

This tactic can work, but you have to be very careful with it imo.

As you need to always be their teacher, not their friend.  You can be the cool teacher, but you must still be the teacher, and they must respect you.  They should always be laughing with you, not at you.

I've seen this happen with a few teachers over the years, where they haven't had their contracts renewed despite being "liked" by the students, or at least they absolutely believed so anyway.  Some of the teachers might have also lost some of their respect as teachers within the community via their actions outside of school hours as well, due to frequently drinking in public (It's a small town, and Thai people love gossip, so everyone knows what you've been upto).

But that line between being liked and being respected is a tough one, sometimes I worry about things I do in class which are flirting with that line a little, although I figure so long as I only occasionally flirt with the line it won't erode the respect my students have for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2018 at 8:30 PM, SlyAnimal said:

Generally I go over the classroom rules at the start of the term, and explain the punishments at the same time.  I find that provided the students know ahead of time what the punishment will be, they will accept the punishment without complaint, and after 1 student in the class has been punished the others will realize that I was being serious.

I only have a pretty narrow spectrum of what I punish though, as I teach in the countryside so it's all about taking small steps.

Cellphone use in class (Unless it's a dictionary) - I'll confiscate their phone for a week.  I don't particularly like looking after phones though, so for the first student to get caught I'll make a song and dance about taking it for a week, then at the end of class will do a coin flip with the student, with heads (the king) returning their phone to them (And I deliberately try to manipulate the toss to ensure I lose).  I also sometimes give the students the choice of 700 lines (100 per day) to get their phone back straight away (For which they are very grateful, since they'd be social outcasts if they couldn't play RoV lol).

Copying homework - For copying homework I give all students involved 500 lines (So both the student copying, and the student who's book they borrowed).

 

Cheating/"Helping" - For students that try to cheat on tests, or who "help" their friends during speaking tests (i.e. Students not being tested saying the answer to a question, just as they do during regular questions in class) I advise the students that they'll receive a minimum of 500 lines, and will also receive 0 on their test as well.  The 0s I usually relent on, and allow a retest or similar after making them sweat for a bit, but do it on a case by case basis.

 

Skipping class - My students need to attend 80%+ of their classes.  If they're excused I don't factor that in at all, but otherwise will fail them if they don't attend at least 80% of my classes.  I usually try to calculate this well before I need to submit their grades, so that I can assign them special homework early.  I give them 500 lines for each day that they were absent, if they can complete their lines before x date (usually a date prior to when I need to submit my grades), then I will give them a 50% "discount" on their lines, and the grade that they deserved (rather than 0 or ม.ส. ).  I will also give them a second date, and if they complete their lines before then they can still have the 50% discount (But because their grade will have already been submitted as a fail, I can only change their grade back to a 1).  I also include an attendance section when calculating their grade, usually around 20%, from which I make deductions every time they are late or absent without a valid reason.

 

Failing tests - I usually don't punish students for poor performances in class.  However on tests that are a large contributor to a student's grade, I will give them the opportunity (Which is often compulsory) to test again with a similar test at lunch time.  When I do so, I will usually cap the maximum score of the re-test at 50% (And make students continue to test at lunch time each week until they can achieve 50%). 

Other - I also occasionally give lines to students that do something weird that I feel is inappropriate or rude e.g. I gave 3 girls 200 lines each because they took 20+ minutes in the toilet.

 

Incomplete lines - Students that are given special homework (lines), and don't complete them within 1 week, have the amount doubled.  When I first started doing this, some students mustn't have realized, and so had 200 lines (I wasn't as harsh then) turn into about 4000+ by the end of the term.  They didn't think it was funny anymore when I failed them and refused to change their grade until their work was completed.

But generally anything within the classroom itself I see as just general classroom management and so don't punish students for anything in class, aside from raising my voice or putting people on the spot via a question or similar.  Even when I do raise my voice etc, my goal is to keep the "approval" of the class, so only do so with fair warning (e.g. most of the class know when I'm about to yell, and enjoy seeing the shock/surprise on their friend's face when they get blasted) as I want to stop disruptive behaviour but not scare them too much.

Anywho, that's how I do things, I think that it works well but everyone has their own way of doing things, hope it's of some help.  I teach in the countryside, and it's 8 years since I first started at the school, so might have a bit more free reign than what some other teachers would e.g. I've heard some schools don't let you fail students, or even yell at students.  With limited experience elsewhere I don't know how flexible other school policies are, but I can definitely do both while still maintaining very positive reviews from the school/students, I just have to do it in the right way.

Edit:  Oh and just in hindsight, I should mention.  I do definitely feel that making it clear to students what the consequences of their actions are, BEFORE they break the rules, is really important.  I use what I feel are excessively harsh punishments for what are relatively minor infractions, this gives me a lot of leeway if I want to reduce a punishment.

Thanks for your input on punishments given per say writing lines. My question would have been what to do if a student never finishes their lines or just simply blows them off and not do them but I see how you link the not doing or finishing lines with grades, etc. Another question would be for offenses not listed like being a disturbance in class, etc. Would you threaten to drop their overall grade?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, White Tiger said:

You could try giving them lines to write out.

 

You might also find that the other students are more than happy to give a troublemaker a clip round the back of the head. If a boy is playing up suggest to one of his classmates sitting nearby that he "dob dob" the naughty student and make a hand gesture to indicate a gentle clip round the ear. More likely than not the boys will be delighted to get permission from the teacher to give another boy a clip round the ear. The student who gets clipped round the back of the head won't be happy at this and will think twice before misbehaving again. You're not hitting any students so you're not breaking any laws; and the students are enforcing their own discipline. This deals with the bad behaviour quickly and in a way that looks like fun to most of the class - naturally the student who gets hit by his classmates won't like it.

Thanks for the suggestion of clip round the ear. Just hope I'm not a bit angry at the time asking another student to give it and gesture to give not just a clip but a hard wack round the ear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, joninisaan said:

Thanks for your input on punishments given per say writing lines. My question would have been what to do if a student never finishes their lines or just simply blows them off and not do them but I see how you link the not doing or finishing lines with grades, etc. Another question would be for offenses not listed like being a disturbance in class, etc. Would you threaten to drop their overall grade?

 

Yeah I've only ever had students try to test me by refusing to do their lines once, which was the time I mentioned in my previous post.  It was actually a group of 3 students, who had each received lines for various infractions (Their class was the naughtiest class I've ever taught, 7x ladyboys, as well as the regular clowns, who would all feed off each other's energy).  Their class was a lot naughtier than others and so I punished them regularly, as did all of the their other western teachers & Thai teachers, so the effects wore off and they lost their fear.

Punishing students too frequently is a problem, they lose their fear of it.  Which is what I feel was the downfall of corporal punishment, and am actually a firm believer that corporal punishment should be legal, but used extremely sparingly (Ideally not at all).  As if a student is given the same punishment regularly, they lose their fear of it, but there needs to always be something else, something scarier that can be used to enforce the other punishments to prevent disobedience.

Much like, a mild mannered teacher who rarely raises his voice, is extremely scary when he does, while a teacher that yells til they're red in the face each day isn't taken seriously anymore, as the teacher who yells has already played their hand, you've seen everything they've got and become used to it.

 

I'm not a good enough teacher to be so mild mannered, I need to raise my voice to single out students, and regularly yell at the class too if they get too noisy.  Although I try to make it clear to them that I'm not angry, by still remaining very calm, as I want to retain "being angry" as the ace up my sleeve.

Now I try to only occasionally give students lines for infractions within class, and only with repeated warnings first if I do, as I do feel it's really important that the students feel they deserve their punishments, and that they fear being punished.

Although in general I take the perspective that if the class is distracted, or even if individuals are distracted, then that's on me.  It isn't really the student's fault that they are talking, as if my lesson was more interesting, or at a level that they could better understand, then they'd be more engaged by it.

As a throwback to what we all likely learnt in our TESOL courses etc, it's all just things like:

- Making eye contact with students, especially the trouble makers, so that they know I'm watching them

- Asking questions to different areas of the classroom, especially the trouble makers, to ensure that everyone thinks they might be next

- Getting the students to all read/speak together, and repeating the same words until they are ALL doing it

 

These are ways to maintaining the focus of the students, but to prevent them drifting off in the first place the lesson also needs to be:

 

- Understandable - If the content is too difficult, or if your speed is too difficult to understand (accent/speed), or if you're trying to teach too much in a single lesson, then the students will switch off, can't be interested in something you don't understand.  Once they're off, it's hard to get them to switch back on, so it's better to start with something easy than to start with something difficult.

- Interesting - The content should be something that the students can relate to, so use Thailand examples rather than Western examples.  Western examples can work well with a group that's already motivated, but for high school kids....

- Engaging - Your personal charm and delivery of the lesson can make it engaging.  Smile, laugh, make jokes (That the students can understand), use body language and compel the students to engage with you.


Hope that doesn't sound too cheesy.  It's all easy stuff, and just common sense, although putting them all together can be like putting together a jigsaw puzzle while blindfolded at times, particularly as they are all interlinked.  So if you do poorly in one aspect, particularly from the second set of 3, then all of the others will become significantly more difficult.

Anyway, hope that didn't sound too much like telling you that water is wet lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, SlyAnimal said:

 

Yeah I've only ever had students try to test me by refusing to do their lines once, which was the time I mentioned in my previous post.  It was actually a group of 3 students, who had each received lines for various infractions (Their class was the naughtiest class I've ever taught, 7x ladyboys, as well as the regular clowns, who would all feed off each other's energy).  Their class was a lot naughtier than others and so I punished them regularly, as did all of the their other western teachers & Thai teachers, so the effects wore off and they lost their fear.

Punishing students too frequently is a problem, they lose their fear of it.  Which is what I feel was the downfall of corporal punishment, and am actually a firm believer that corporal punishment should be legal, but used extremely sparingly (Ideally not at all).  As if a student is given the same punishment regularly, they lose their fear of it, but there needs to always be something else, something scarier that can be used to enforce the other punishments to prevent disobedience.

Much like, a mild mannered teacher who rarely raises his voice, is extremely scary when he does, while a teacher that yells til they're red in the face each day isn't taken seriously anymore, as the teacher who yells has already played their hand, you've seen everything they've got and become used to it.

 

I'm not a good enough teacher to be so mild mannered, I need to raise my voice to single out students, and regularly yell at the class too if they get too noisy.  Although I try to make it clear to them that I'm not angry, by still remaining very calm, as I want to retain "being angry" as the ace up my sleeve.

Now I try to only occasionally give students lines for infractions within class, and only with repeated warnings first if I do, as I do feel it's really important that the students feel they deserve their punishments, and that they fear being punished.

Although in general I take the perspective that if the class is distracted, or even if individuals are distracted, then that's on me.  It isn't really the student's fault that they are talking, as if my lesson was more interesting, or at a level that they could better understand, then they'd be more engaged by it.

As a throwback to what we all likely learnt in our TESOL courses etc, it's all just things like:

- Making eye contact with students, especially the trouble makers, so that they know I'm watching them

- Asking questions to different areas of the classroom, especially the trouble makers, to ensure that everyone thinks they might be next

- Getting the students to all read/speak together, and repeating the same words until they are ALL doing it

 

These are ways to maintaining the focus of the students, but to prevent them drifting off in the first place the lesson also needs to be:

 

- Understandable - If the content is too difficult, or if your speed is too difficult to understand (accent/speed), or if you're trying to teach too much in a single lesson, then the students will switch off, can't be interested in something you don't understand.  Once they're off, it's hard to get them to switch back on, so it's better to start with something easy than to start with something difficult.

- Interesting - The content should be something that the students can relate to, so use Thailand examples rather than Western examples.  Western examples can work well with a group that's already motivated, but for high school kids....

- Engaging - Your personal charm and delivery of the lesson can make it engaging.  Smile, laugh, make jokes (That the students can understand), use body language and compel the students to engage with you.


Hope that doesn't sound too cheesy.  It's all easy stuff, and just common sense, although putting them all together can be like putting together a jigsaw puzzle while blindfolded at times, particularly as they are all interlinked.  So if you do poorly in one aspect, particularly from the second set of 3, then all of the others will become significantly more difficult.

Anyway, hope that didn't sound too much like telling you that water is wet lol.

Thanks for the added points. I already had to make some boys who were playing around in class. I let the class go lunch early about 10 minutes before lunch (as I was hungry already) but the boys stayed back and wrote just 10 lines (M 1 and time was an essence) but they wrote it like their life depended on it and I told them to write 50 more and turn in by this week. If they don't, then Ill up the sentences next week 100 and still keep them back from the rest of the class to write a minimum from the 100 they have to turn in in 1 week. Of course for the class to go lunch early by 10 minutes is if the class is well behaved. Also, JUST in case, I push the time back by 10 minutes to play with  so that I don't give the parents of the students staying back and writing sentences something to complain about that I'm keeping the students away from lunch. 

Ill see how these boys behave now in class as to why I kept the numbers small but will definitely add if they start acting up in class again.

Thanks again for your post that gave me some great ideas

Truly appreciate it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...