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Bonobojt

Can a foreigner become a monk in Thailand ?

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2 minutes ago, Bonobojt said:

Nooo !!

Judging from your previous suicidal posts, you are either a troll or someone with deep mental health issues.

A troll doesn't belong on TV, a mental case doesn't belong in Thailand.

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Yes it's possible.  I'm from the US and I was in Thailand for 7 years as a ordained Monk.  2006 - 2013.  I got out because of the health of my Mother and no family left to take care of her.  No I was not charged a fee.  You will only need someone to buy your robes and alms bowl.  Even if you might have to pay for them yourself.  The big problem, and it's really not that big, is finding a temple that will take you on.  Most Thai's don't speak English.  I was at a small country temple in Lopburi.  I would suggest finding a temple in either Bangkok or Chaing Mai.  I would also suggest staying a month as a novice first to see if you like it.  Wat PahNanaChat is a great temple for foreigners, because they all speak English, but they are really strict.  No cell phones, internet, girlie magazines, nada.  It took me approx. 6 months to become used to the monks life.  1 meal a day was hard for awhile and yes I lost about 20 lbs.  But you get used to it.  At your 1 meal a day, you eat as much as you can.  I could go on and on, but would rather answer your questions.  Good luck. 

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I'm guessing your looking for some answers you won't get here on Thai Visa, because probably 99.9% of these guys were never a Monk, I would suggest you go visit one or both of these temples in England.

Wat Pah Santidhamma, the Forest Hermitage, at Fulbrook Ln, Warwickshire, e-mail, [email protected]  or  

Amaravati Buddhist Monastery at St. Margarets, Hemel, Hempstead.  Tele:  01-442-842455.  

There are actually English monks there and both Abbots there are Englishmen, who will answer any questions you may have.  Visa's to Thailand allowing you to be a monk there is one of the questions you need to ask.  

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you were given some money, -use them to buy a condo in england

to reduce your monthly cost for the rest of your life.

in case you get a load of money yet again, -you can rent it out

and go abroad.

try to find out how to get hold of nembutal so that door is always open,

maybe work at a pet vet shop, if nothing else working with animals will

cheer you up, but yet you havnt forced your hands

since you dont owe any animal,

you will still have all options available

 

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Seriously, though, there are quite a few, and it's quite serious, at least in the Forest Tradition, which I recommend, no fancy temples, for the most part, just dedication to the dharma. Most foreigners go to Wat Pa Nanachart in Ubon Ratchatani, but if you speak Thai, then there are other options. I spent time at a Forest Temple up north in Mae Chan, and actually ended up being the temple driver for a while, since I wasn't ordained. Monks don't drive. If you're new to it all, then you should probably try a meditation retreat first, then take it from there. Wat Suan Mokh near Surat Thani is good, English language or Thai sessions, but there are others, also. It's the real deal and cost is minimal--just get there. Good luck. If you have any question, then msg me, as I won't follow the thread...

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On ‎6‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 12:20 AM, Hardie said:

Seriously, though, there are quite a few, and it's quite serious, at least in the Forest Tradition, which I recommend, no fancy temples, for the most part, just dedication to the dharma. Most foreigners go to Wat Pa Nanachart in Ubon Ratchatani, but if you speak Thai, then there are other options. I spent time at a Forest Temple up north in Mae Chan, and actually ended up being the temple driver for a while, since I wasn't ordained. Monks don't drive. If you're new to it all, then you should probably try a meditation retreat first, then take it from there. Wat Suan Mokh near Surat Thani is good, English language or Thai sessions, but there are others, also. It's the real deal and cost is minimal--just get there. Good luck. If you have any question, then msg me, as I won't follow the thread...

Wat Pah Nanachart is probably the best for foreigners, but it is really difficult to get in as they only take those who are serious.  

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