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BANGKOK 23 July 2019 05:42
MrPatrickThai

Small AA Group - Tradition 3

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in short :

'The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.'

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On 8/24/2018 at 6:05 PM, orchis said:

in short :

'The only requirement for AA membership is a desire to stop drinking.'

Erm, you forgot something, which is rather important...one must be an alcoholic, too.

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Erm, you forgot something, which is rather important...one must be an alcoholic, too.


Where does it say that?

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On 6/26/2018 at 12:19 PM, GarryP said:

Surely, if they do not need to use the steps (their words) then there is no reason for them to be there.  And by being there,  perhaps they are negatively impacting the benefit to be gained by the other members. I would ask them to start their own group which better meets their needs, such as one for their mental disorders (depression/PTSD).   

That's the best way, IMHO. 

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On 6/26/2018 at 12:00 PM, MrPatrickThai said:

Any two or three alcoholics gathered together for sobriety may call themselves an A.A. group

I think I see the word alcoholic in there.

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5 minutes ago, mogandave said:

 


Where does it say that?

 

Tradition 3, which in MrPatrick Thai's OP.

Edited by Neeranam

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I think I see the word alcoholic in there.


I missed the part where it says alcoholics only.

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4 hours ago, mogandave said:

 


I missed the part where it says alcoholics only.
 

 

Our membership ought to include all who suffer from alcoholism.

 

 It's quite clear, the short version, "a desire to stop drinking" is misunderstood by some. 

"Hence we may refuse none who wish to recover" means that any person, who suffers from alcoholism, AND has(not OR) the desire to stop drinking may be a member. Others are welcome to come and listen at open meetings but they can not be members.

 

This is my understanding anyway, from what is written.

 

 

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I would have been classed as a heavy drinker ? not reliant on alcohol, just abusing it and people around me. Now extremely happy to have got it under control without AA

This Mr Patrick guy, his heartless, unrelenting attitude, surrounding who is and who is not entitled to attend meetings makes me pleased I never felt the inclination to attend even one AA meeting.

I always considered an AA meeting would be led by condescending prats who were only too keen to enthuse about the 12 steps and publicise their story of redemption. Might work for some - those who apparently meet the admission criteria.

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Our membership ought to include all who suffer from alcoholism.
 
 It's quite clear, the short version, "a desire to stop drinking" is misunderstood by some. 
"Hence we may refuse none who wish to recover" means that any person, who suffers from alcoholism, AND has(not OR) the desire to stop drinking may be a member. Others are welcome to come and listen at open meetings but they can not be members.
 
This is my understanding anyway, from what is written.
 
 


So someone has to identify as an alcoholic to suffer from alcoholism? I think not.

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8 minutes ago, mogandave said:

 


So someone has to identify as an alcoholic to suffer from alcoholism? I think not.
 

 

Of course not.

 

I never said that.

 

Only Bill Wilson could answer questions on what he wrote and meant.

 

 

Edited by Neeranam

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Of course not.
 
I never said that.
 
Only Bill Wilson could answer questions on what he wrote and meant.
 
 


So we’re back to anyone that has a desire to stop drinking.

Clearly it is not up to the membership to decide who is, and who is not, an alcoholic. Neither is it up to the membership to decide who does or does not suffer from alcoholism.

So what if someone has progressed in their recovery such that they’re no longer suffering, would they no longer be welcome?

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16 hours ago, Neeranam said:

Of course not.

 

I never said that.

 

Only Bill Wilson could answer questions on what he wrote and meant.

 

 

Well there you have it! We read all of the words in the 12x12 and here it is out of the horses month! Next we will hear FAKE NEWS! Some people just like to keep the cotton in their ears. 

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On 8/27/2018 at 10:46 PM, mogandave said:

So what if someone has progressed in their recovery such that they’re no longer suffering, would they no longer be welcome? 

Do you mean a recovered alcoholic that is referred to so often in the big book? 

 

Everybody in AA is not alcoholic, even Bill W knew that. P21 talks about the real alcoholic, very different to the moderate or continuous hard drinker. He talks about the real alcoholic many times in the big book.

 

It is very important to know if you are a real one or not.

For real ones, there is only one solution, a spiritual solution. "God could and would if he is sought"

If we don't have a spiritual experience we will die. Only God can remove this obsession.

 

For the phony ones, they can just go to a meeting and moan about the Bangkok traffic, think doing 90 meetings in 90 days will save them, say ignorant things like meeting makers make it. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Do you mean a recovered alcoholic that is referred to so often in the big book? 
 
Everybody in AA is not alcoholic, even Bill W knew that. P21 talks about the real alcoholic, very different to the moderate or continuous hard drinker. He talks about the real alcoholic many times in the big book.
 
It is very important to know if you are a real one or not.
For real ones, there is only one solution, a spiritual solution. "God could and would if he is sought"
If we don't have a spiritual experience we will die. Only God can remove this obsession.
 
For the phony ones, they can just go to a meeting and moan about the Bangkok traffic, think doing 90 meetings in 90 days will save them, say ignorant things like meeting makers make it. 


No, I’m not talking about an alcoholic that has recovered, I’m talking about alcoholics that no longer suffer from alcoholism. Why is that not clear? Is there a lot of suffering in the meetings you attend?

So if we do have a spiritual experience we won’t die?

You seem to be seething with resentment, about these guys. Why give them so much power over you?

“Emotional Sobriety”

Do some writing dude, and not on here.

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