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New video shows boys in good spirits inside Tham Luang cave


Jonathan Fairfield

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New video shows boys in good spirits inside Tham Luang cave

 

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A day after they were located by British divers, new footage of the boys trapped inside the Tham Luang cave has been shared by the Thai Navy.

 

The minute long clip, shared on the Thai Navy SEAL Facebook page, showed the boys wrapped in space blankets to keep warm and being cared for by specialist navy doctors who are staying with the boys in the cave.

 

The boys, who appeared in good spirits, can be seen saying hello to the camera. Footage being shown on Thai Channel 3 on Wednesday morning also showed some of the boys receiving treatment to minor injuries to their feet. 

 

 

 

The footage was released as rescuers warned of the difficult task ahead in rescuing the boys from the cave.

 

Aged between 11 and 16, the boys and their 25-year-old coach went missing on June 23, after they set out to explore the caves in a forest park following a training session.

 

Rear Admiral Apakorn Yuukongkaew, commander of the SEALS unit, said rain was still a challenge but the boys would be taken out safely as soon as sufficient water could be pumped out of the cave.

 

"But if that doesn't work, with the seasonal rain, we'll do it another way," he told reporters.

 

"We have Plan 'A' and Plan 'B', and ultimately, everyone will return to their parents' embrace."

 

The 13 have been given a gel with high calorie and mineral content to sustain them while rescue plans are worked out.

 

 

Officials declined to say what plans 'A' and 'B' were, but said they aimed to bring the boys out the same way they had entered.

 

Options included teaching the group to use smaller diving apparatus and guiding them out of the caves, from which 120 million litres of water had been pumped continuously for 75 hours by Tuesday evening.

 

The SEALS tried to get phone lines into the cave to allow the boys to speak to parents and families staying at a nearby shelter throughout what could be Thailand's most high-profile rescue mission.

 

At the Tham Luang cave complex in Chiang Rai, security personnel turned away scores of people who came to show support, while more journalists joined hundreds of media representatives who have covered the drama blow-by-blow.

 

Two British divers experienced in cave rescues, John Volanthen and Rick Stanton, were first to reach the boys, accompanied by the SEALS divers.

 

Their search targeted an elevated mound they believed could have provided a refuge, but that was already flooded, so they went 400 metres (1,312 ft) further, and found the team.

 

News of the discovery sparked jubilation among relatives and rescuers and spread swiftly enough to figure on the front pages of Tuesday's newspapers.

 

"Found the 13 'Wild Boars', safe and preparing to come out," was the headline in the country's biggest daily, Thai Rath.

 

Caricatures of smiling volunteers, rescue workers and media spread on social media and messaging platforms, applauding a search mission that involved citizens of Australia, Britain, China, Japan, Myanmar and the United States, among others.

 

"Take our hearts - thank you," read one cartoon, while another read "You are our heroes," followed by "Thank you," in eight languages.

 

Thais posted messages of joy and relief on Facebook, showering praise on Chiang Rai governor Narongsak Osottanakorn. "Have to applaud this man," said one, while another asked, "Why not try for prime minister?"

 

His deputy, Passakorn Bunyalak, dismissed rumours that the mission could last up to four months, but said the boys' safety was paramount and their extraction should not be rushed.

 

Sura Jeetwatee, a doctor involved in the operations, said the team survived by staying put and drinking water that dripped from stalactite formations.

 

SEALS commander Apakorn said the flow of a cave stream had slowed and water once at head level was now at shin level. He said the boys were in relatively good condition.

 

"The children have been in there for ten days, they have food, doctors – they are doing well," he said. "There is no rush."

 

Additional text from Reuters

 

 

 
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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2018-07-04
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2 hours ago, djjamie said:

Their coach deserves a medal for looking after these kids in such challenging conditions. 

I agree but last I heard they want to prosecute him..

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Rather surprised to see they haven't had a change of clothes yet.

 

Obviously some reason for that (besides the possible one that they haven't had the resources to bring the clothing through just yet).

 

Perhaps physiological?

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1 hour ago, chrisinth said:

Rather surprised to see they haven't had a change of clothes yet.

 

Obviously some reason for that (besides the possible one that they haven't had the resources to bring the clothing through just yet).

 

Perhaps physiological?

I also wonder how hard it is to wade/dive to that cave where the boys are. Is that a long part of the trip? I guess so or they would just carry the boys home right now.

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4 minutes ago, Thian said:

I also wonder how hard it is to wade/dive to that cave where the boys are. Is that a long part of the trip? I guess so or they would just carry the boys home right now.

They can bring food and medical gear through OK. As far as hygiene goes, I would have thought it would have been high on their list to get them cleaned and out of the old clothes.

 

I'm pretty sure after 11 days without proper sanitation they will be pretty ripe and home to a lot of bacteria.

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2 hours ago, yougivemebaby said:

I hope there is no possibility of the area they are in to flood. But I suppose they have a back up plan for that..... Right?

UM. 

They really don't know if the whole cave fills up when the real monsoons come in a few days or weeks. They thought pattaya beach would be dry, when in fact it was flooded. They are still in a great deal of danger once those rains start. 

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Was that the coach on the right. He looks quite sad and thin. Apparently he gave his food to the children. He really took good care of them and got them to the right place. Nature is fickle. He did a great job in a bad situation. He should get a medal. 

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19 minutes ago, chrisinth said:

They can bring food and medical gear through OK. As far as hygiene goes, I would have thought it would have been high on their list to get them cleaned and out of the old clothes.

 

I'm pretty sure after 11 days without proper sanitation they will be pretty ripe and home to a lot of bacteria.

Here you can get a better impression about the route to pattaya beach, it's very hard.

 

They need some of these from Holland, not those babypumps

 

 

 

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Rather surprised to see they haven't had a change of clothes yet.
 
Obviously some reason for that (besides the possible one that they haven't had the resources to bring the clothing through just yet).
 
Perhaps physiological?
Surprising to say the least.
Boys are skin and bone, but the seals are well dressed tough....
Playing around with iodine for the cameras instead of putting on socks and boots to stay warm and away from wear and tear.


Jackets, pants, boots and something on the head.

Conserve energy is important as food is "expensive" in that cave.

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Was that the coach on the right. He looks quite sad and thin. Apparently he gave his food to the children. He really took good care of them and got them to the right place. Nature is fickle. He did a great job in a bad situation. He should get a medal. 
Or he could just stop being stupid and bring other peoples kids into caves during rain season.

Thats also an option.
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