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idman

Another change for U.S. Citizens.

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2 minutes ago, Mansell said:

I went recently to get the US statement from the outreach. Unfortunately after four hours on a bus I spaced out and put down my income as over 22,000 dollars a month, and I didn't realize until I was heading home on the bus. Should I just do the extension, or shlep to BKK for another letter? Will the IM officer even notice? Another big hassle to go to BKK, but my bad.

You need a new income letter. I'm surprised the Embassy people didn't question this boo-boo.

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No one else has posted having a problem described by the OP as being a new policy for everyone?... The OP seemed to be relatively new to Thailand and may have just been profiled... It would be useful to know the OPs age and previous visa history... I agree with the recent posts that immigration is just looking to see if you are prepared and have a good story to show if asked... Much of what you would present to them they would not understand and as stated just wave you on with that... I would say that a Thai bank statement or ATM stub of foreign transfer into the country  would be the best and without these I can understand the Immigration finding you suspect...

 

Again has anyone else been subjected to this new policy?...

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Thanks sfokevin. A breath of common sense amongst the inevitable hysteria over a single post. Lets hope for clarification from others.

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This may not apply to everyone. I have 2 private pensions that I receive 1099-Rs for. Plus Social Security. Those forms might be enough to back up the income affidavit for US citizens. 

 

I also have letterheads from my two private pensions that show the amounts I will receive for life. Although anyone could have created these letters on a computer, they were acceptable when I applied for my Non-Imm O-A 4 years ago in Los Angeles. I showed the Consulate a bank statement as well but the balance was far below the requirement so it was approved pretty much on letterhead verification.

 

If you have reasonable documentation I think everyone will be OK. The others will just have to get creative.

 

 

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21 hours ago, elektrified said:

This has been discussed on FB for a few days now. "Don't have the proof? Then come back when you do."

Which FB group?

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Recently, I heard the same story of request for back-up proof for a U.S. income letter for someone who was attempting a DIY visa conversion at CM Imm.  This may be just another technique they're using to make it difficult for newbies to try to do visa conversions themselves to encourage them to use agents.

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20 hours ago, TallGuyJohninBKK said:

 

Did you get any feel for whether the same request was being made of everyone else/others?

 

I was there yesterday.  In the past they did not ask for a print out of the forex transfer from overseas, I was sent away to get it. And my TM30 acknowledged slip. And my other half's house documents, and her Thai ID. 

But it seemed pleasant and routine,  I didn't feel they had singled me out. 

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24 minutes ago, jmd8800 said:

This may not apply to everyone. I have 2 private pensions that I receive 1099-Rs for. Plus Social Security. Those forms might be enough to back up the income affidavit for US citizens. 

 

I'm planning on having this for back-up. I assume CY 2017 1099's (-R & -SSA) would be sufficient?

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3 hours ago, Thaidream said:

Every  foreigner living in Thailand has to have someway of bringing their income into the country-

 

 

For income brought into Thailand,, yes. But there's also income that may never come into Thailand in the ways you describe above.

 

I figure, at present, probably half of my monthly spending IN Thailand is done via home country debit and credit cards, and none of that money ever comes into Thailand in a record keeping sense. It's only my outside Thailand income being spent here. So that income/spending would not get reflected in any Thai bank statement, ATM receipts, etc.

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3 hours ago, Thaidream said:

Every  foreigner living in Thailand has to have someway of bringing their income into the country-

-ATM cards from an overseas bank- receipts from  Thai ATM or bank records from abroad

-Brokerage accounts - records and statements provided

-Rental income- leases and transfer to a bank

-Thai Account with foreign transfers

-Pension amounts and letters of proof.

 

Every form of income has some type of documentation and there is always a bottom line that can be shown as proof.  The immigration act clearly states that either proof of  65,000 Baht OR 800,000 in a  Thai Bank. Just give them  the Embassy/Consulate affidavit and a simple letter/statement from  bank/brokerage/other that matches or exceeds the affidavit. For those who have income from various sources- an accountant letter or lawyer letter- with a total should suffice.

 

 

 

I

Not true at all.  If one returns home and comes back with $10,000 in USD, there would not be any transaction record of money arriving in Thailand, which, I believe as time goes on the Thais are actually going to want to see.  I myself plan to return to the states at least twice a year as I have various interests there that require or I want to spend my attention on. So coming and going twice a year, I would not have to transfer much money to Thailand explicitly.  Cash and carry most of the time

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28 minutes ago, jmd8800 said:

This may not apply to everyone. I have 2 private pensions that I receive 1099-Rs for. Plus Social Security. Those forms might be enough to back up the income affidavit for US citizens. 

 

I also have letterheads from my two private pensions that show the amounts I will receive for life. Although anyone could have created these letters on a computer, they were acceptable when I applied for my Non-Imm O-A 4 years ago in Los Angeles. I showed the Consulate a bank statement as well but the balance was far below the requirement so it was approved pretty much on letterhead verification.

 

If you have reasonable documentation I think everyone will be OK. The others will just have to get creative.

 

 

yah, a US counsel member would or certainly could be trained to understand what a 1099 is, what social security statements are, etc.  But as far as what a Thai official may request to see or demand, or in worse case demand to see monthly transfers INTO Thailand, well, we shall see how the cases pop up.  I could show lots of things, but would not want to show my bank account or IRA account numbers and yearly income statements or estimated monthly incomes.  All those numbers given freely to a foreign country that has no guarantees on safeguarding such information?  Getting quite risky.

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34 minutes ago, jmd8800 said:

This may not apply to everyone. I have 2 private pensions that I receive 1099-Rs for. Plus Social Security. Those forms might be enough to back up the income affidavit for US citizens. 

 

I also have letterheads from my two private pensions that show the amounts I will receive for life. Although anyone could have created these letters on a computer, they were acceptable when I applied for my Non-Imm O-A 4 years ago in Los Angeles. I showed the Consulate a bank statement as well but the balance was far below the requirement so it was approved pretty much on letterhead verification.

 

If you have reasonable documentation I think everyone will be OK. The others will just have to get creative.

 

 

but what people are sidestepping is that you may need to show monthly remittances to Thailand that match your letter.  It would be very easy to show money moving into a bank account in the US, from many sources..showing 65000 per month transferred over would be much more difficult for most, and of the half that aren't lying, I don't think that many send it all over every month, and that would be a pretty fat SS check.  My dad paid the max in for decades and gets about 1700, but started getting it at 62, over 20 years ago.  Many get company pensions, too, many dont.  The big question is do they want to see the remittance.

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3 hours ago, Thaidream said:

Every  foreigner living in Thailand has to have someway of bringing their income into the country-

This is true, but what about the Americans living here that make money from investments made here in Thailand? Property rentals for example. This money should be used in the calculation. I am probably wrong, but I have never seen specifically where it says the money must be brought from overseas. I have only heard that it should.

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7 minutes ago, missoura said:

 but I have never seen specifically where it says the money must be brought from overseas. I have only heard that it should.

The income affidavit template from the US Embassy Bangkok states:

 

I also affirm that I receive a monthly income of $__XXX__ from sources in the United States.

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I never had any trouble just needed to provide proof of minimum 800,000 THB in the local bank for a minimum of 3 months. Have they changed the requirement now? 

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