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BANGKOK 20 February 2019 23:41
Damian Murray

Building a western style house compared to Thai build

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2 hours ago, Muhendis said:

the second law of thermodynamics boils down to the following fact: heat flows from hot to cold until everything is at the same temperature.

1 hour ago, CGW said:

Which fundamentally is the same? In the summertime we rarely have any windows open which keeps the heat from outside coming in, the "insulation" keeps the inside cool, if it gets too warm or humid (more of an issue than heat a lot of times!) we put AC on at 28c which keeps the inside cool & dry with minimal losses to the outside! ? 

Yes. To all intents and purposes it is the same however note the second law of thermodynamics above as supplied by johng. There is no doubt that a thermally insulated house is a must for countries that are very hot and for countries that are very cold as your example shows.

 

 

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Post 27 mentions damp course barrier and lintels. Both products should be easy to buy in any province in Thailand. I see Lintels made by Q Con and Diamond Building Products at more than one builders merchants store in Buriram. Moisture barrier plastic in various thickness and widths are easy to order and often on stock in Buriram. 

Buriram Autoclaved Steel Door Lintel Home Delivery.jpg

Buriram Surin Window Door Lintel.JPG

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7 minutes ago, Muhendis said:

Yes. To all intents and purposes it is the same however note the second law of thermodynamics above as supplied by johng. There is no doubt that a thermally insulated house is a must for countries that are very hot and for countries that are very cold as your example shows.

Yep, I can confirm that "the second law of thermodynamics" is correct, If I leave the windows open and its hotter outside than in, it gets hotter inside ?

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2 hours ago, CGW said:

Yep, I can confirm that "the second law of thermodynamics" is correct, If I leave the windows open and its hotter outside than in, it gets hotter inside ?

Give that man a PhD.

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Have to say guys, all your advice has been great and I intend to use a little bit of all your suggestions when I start my build, now,can you also tell me, in today's financial climate in Thailand, would now be a good time to start building, are materials any cheaper now than say 5 years ago?

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2 minutes ago, Damian Murray said:

Have to say guys, all your advice has been great and I intend to use a little bit of all your suggestions when I start my build, now,can you also tell me, in today's financial climate in Thailand, would now be a good time to start building, are materials any cheaper now than say 5 years ago?

Very few things in life ever get cheaper , but some things as they become more readily available do come down in price . such as AAC block (super block) which a few years ago was difficult to find and expensive, now it is available everywhere and at a better price. But overall it is more expensive to build now than it ever was, and IMO it is not going down any time soon, or ever. 

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The post above is excellent. labor will always go up in cost. AAC blocks cost less in 2018 than I paid in 2007.  Much wider selection of modern building materials available now. Build when you can afford to build, with a decent builder, and you will be happier every day rather than living in that rental or inlaw's house. 

 

Edited by kamalabob2
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Start your build towards the end of the rain season and hopefully get the roof on before the start of the next. Your builders can then work in the dry. No excuses then.

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11 hours ago, Rally123 said:

Start your build towards the end of the rain season and hopefully get the roof on before the start of the next. Your builders can then work in the dry. No excuses then.

Quite, soil should still be relatively soft to do the footings and dry weather while pouring the concrete.

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On 8/11/2018 at 6:33 AM, Damian Murray said:

Have to say guys, all your advice has been great and I intend to use a little bit of all your suggestions when I start my build, now,can you also tell me, in today's financial climate in Thailand, would now be a good time to start building, are materials any cheaper now than say 5 years ago?

14 years ago, not 5, but I had a house built in Udon Thani; single level, 120 s/m, 3 BR, 2 bath, western kitchen, tile roof for just under B500,000, all in.  

A friend built a very similar house in Buriram 2 years ago and it cost B1.3 million.

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My main criticism of Thai house construction is the capacity of a concrete beam to span more than about 4 metres. This governs the size of your rooms, but worse, leaves you with a concrete column bang in the middle of your living room which I'd bump into at 2am when off to raid the fridge.

I'm not qualified so don't slap me down too hard. I would be looking for a more elaborate roof support system to avoid this.  Aircraft hangars don't have this problem.

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I swung a hammer for quite a while and worked for a foundation pouring company here in the USA.  In one day we would go and set up the forms for one house in the morning, the trucks would come and pour in the cement.  The site was already graded and staked out and we grunts just went to work.  We do a little smoothing and pushing to make sure cement flowed correctly.  This was a 5 man crew with all the form panels unloaded from the flatbed truck.  Then in the afternoon we would go over to the house where we had poured a day or so before and remove all the forms from that house, load those forms on the truck. and repeat.  We used standard sized panel forms that we tied together.  Knocked off the ends of the ties when cement was cured, removed the forms, loaded them back on the truck.  Then depending on the site we coated the walls with a thick bunch of waterproofing goo.  It was pretty hard work, but went pretty smoothly. Some house foundations had a few extra zigs and zags or door openings we had to do a little carpentry on for special forms, but my boss in general had simple designs for his houses that made things quick and easy.

 

  From what I have seen in Thailand, pouring foundations and walls in a simple rapid fashion such as this would not go over all.  They don't seem to be interested in finishing quickly.  They seem to want more laborers so they like individual concrete block, that they can labor over.   In the old days in the USA I have seen construction companies taking time to build the form panels (just basic plywood with some 2x4 bracking), but my boss' company already had those built, and replaced some degraded ones now and then.  His forms were ready to go at a moment's notice.  And we were busy every day running from one job site to another.  New England has a relatively short construction season compared to some areas, so ramming and jamming in the summer time is what we did.

 

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12 hours ago, dddave said:

14 years ago, not 5, but I had a house built in Udon Thani; single level, 120 s/m, 3 BR, 2 bath, western kitchen, tile roof for just under B500,000, all in.  

A friend built a very similar house in Buriram 2 years ago and it cost B1.3 million.

interesting numbers.  sure is still a lot cheaper than just about anything in the west except small pre fab houses.  How much did the land cost? and what sort of arrangement did you have for the land since foreigners can't own the land.  Did you have a long term lease?  Put it in the wife's name?  did the wife or her family already own the land?

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Standard H beams or I Beams sold all over Thailand are six meters in length. It is not a challenge to have rooms in your Thailand home with spans longer than 4 meters. No need for a column if you work with your architect to use H Beams or I beams as support. Or you can have even larger rear bar sizes in larger concrete columns and larger concrete beams to easily build rooms with spans longer than six meters. This is not rocket science and a reasonable licensed Thai architect can do these plans. I have this at my home in Buriram and it was not a challenge in 2007.  Rebar can be straight and need not always be bent when delivered to your home in Isaan. 

Buriram High Strength Straight Rebar Steel Delivery.jpg

Steel to build Buriram Home delivery.jpg

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9 hours ago, gk10002000 said:

interesting numbers.  sure is still a lot cheaper than just about anything in the west except small pre fab houses.  How much did the land cost? and what sort of arrangement did you have for the land since foreigners can't own the land.  Did you have a long term lease?  Put it in the wife's name?  did the wife or her family already own the land?

Girlfriend owned the land, deed in her name.  I was in full Sir Galahad mode, saving the fair maiden. 

After a year of watching rice grow as my primary entertainment, I bailed. 

She got the house and I learned a costly lesson.

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