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BANGKOK 23 May 2019 10:16
webfact

Chinese tourist drowns at Koh Racha

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Chinese tourist drowns at Koh Racha

By Kritsada Mueanhawong

 

IMG_1451.jpg

 

A male Chinese tourist, who ignored red flags, has drowned at Koh Racha yesterday (August 19).

 

Chalong Police were notified at 1.40pm that a tourist was unconscious after being pulled from surf just off the island’s main beach. The tourist was immediately taken on a speedboat back to Chalong Pier.

 

The tourist was later identified as 32 year old Zhang Guo Jun, a Chinese national.  He was rushed to Chalong Hospital where he was later pronounced dead.

 

Full story: https://thethaiger.com/news/phuket/chinese-tourist-drowns-at-koh-racha

 
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-- © Copyright The Thaiger 2018-08-20

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It make me wonder if the public generally understand the significance of the red flags?

Do people take an interest in what's around them and whether it's relevant to what they're doing?

 

I wouldn't know if you can narrow it down to a nationality - Chinese in this instance:

"his family of four were waiting for a boat to head back to Phuket they decided to go for a swim in a location where there were red flags along the beach."

 

Is it a case of informing the public better, or is it pointless if some are just not spatially aware of anything?

 

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I am actually starting to feel bad for the Chinese.

 

RIP.

 

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Drowning is a major cause of death for Chinese at home, not just on holiday.

 

"About 60,000 Chinese drown every year.

Drowning is the single leading cause of injury death in Chinese children aged 1-14 years.

Nearly 700 Chinese citizens were killed while traveling overseas last year - one-third of them died during water-based activities while on holiday, such as swimming and snorkeling."

 

These statistics were taken from this recent article, tends to put things in perspective. The problem begins at home.

Interesting reading.

 

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1111189.shtml

Edited by Old Croc
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3 hours ago, webfact said:

A male Chinese tourist, who ignored red flags

Time to use another color! Now they just think it points the way to home.

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Is any effort made to inform Chinese tourists the meaning of the red flags??

Where were the lifeguards in this instance? Were they patrolling the beach?

 

 

I suspect that most tourists have no idea the flags are anything more than decoration.

 

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Great business opportunity for a trained Life Guardsman/woman. Teaching basic swimming lessons both here and particularly in China. Might also teach international warning signs such as RED FLAGS (no offense to China's National Flag, that they might be concerned about too).

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7 hours ago, Old Croc said:

Drowning is a major cause of death for Chinese at home, not just on holiday.

 

"About 60,000 Chinese drown every year.

Drowning is the single leading cause of injury death in Chinese children aged 1-14 years.

Nearly 700 Chinese citizens were killed while traveling overseas last year - one-third of them died during water-based activities while on holiday, such as swimming and snorkeling."

 

These statistics were taken from this recent article, tends to put things in perspective. The problem begins at home.

Interesting reading.

 

http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1111189.shtml

Seems like a national tragedy wherever they are.  

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In most Countries in the world a red flag means danger or no swimming. I believe this standard is also used in China.

Edited by Kiwiken

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23 hours ago, bluesofa said:

It make me wonder if the public generally understand the significance of the red flags?

Do people take an interest in what's around them and whether it's relevant to what they're doing?

 

I wouldn't know if you can narrow it down to a nationality - Chinese in this instance:

"his family of four were waiting for a boat to head back to Phuket they decided to go for a swim in a location where there were red flags along the beach."

 

Is it a case of informing the public better, or is it pointless if some are just not spatially aware of anything?

 

He might of thought Red Flag was for Chinese only to swim

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