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BANGKOK 27 March 2019 07:44
chiangrai

Measuring Carbs.

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On 9/1/2018 at 8:32 PM, stud858 said:

I've read that when food scientists were stipulating food groups and classifying vitamins, minerals proteins and fats, all the unnecessary carbon hydrogen linked chemicals that were left over as unclassified as energy helpful were simply classified as carbohydrates that can break down into sugars to fuel the body.

 

But if they were 100% completely eradicated no I'll effects would occur in contrast to say if you eradicated 100 % all fats from your diet you would be dead.

 

Just as a matter of fact that nearly all things will at least contain some carbs begs the question why?

 

Going by the amount of carbs in meats and most vegetables, I would say 10 % carbs is good to aim for.

 

Another weird thing is about fruit. It is comparatively quite high in carbs. It's as natural as veggies. Should we eat fruit at all. Is the Bible trying to tell us something about fruit being forbidden.

 

 

If you believe humans were meant to process foods to eat them such as wheat then that argument may stand that carbs are meant to be eaten. Fortunately a few months without wheat and other processed seeds will prove that your body will be better off without it.

 

But people live for the now and are creatures of habit, that's why the chocolate donut with sprinkles wins out.

 

 

Do you cook your meat? if so why? this is processed food..........

 

Fruits have high (relatively & some) carbs but they also have fibre.... 

 

you state that cutting out wheat & other seeds will leave you better off - how so? could you quantify this?

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On 9/1/2018 at 7:00 PM, ncc1701d said:

Veggies are carbs. 

 

You will still need carbs to function, so trying to completely eradicate them is not the aim. Just, as many have posted, get off the breads, pastas, rice etc.

Veggies are not carbs. Veggies contain carbs to varying degrees. Cup of peas: 120 gm carbs. Cup of green beans: 5 gm carbs. If you are managing your carbs, it helps to know the low carb veggies.

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12 minutes ago, FracturedRabbit said:

Veggies are not carbs. Veggies contain carbs to varying degrees. Cup of peas: 120 gm carbs. Cup of green beans: 5 gm carbs. If you are managing your carbs, it helps to know the low carb veggies.

I’d like to see the vegetable that has higher percentage of protein over total carbohydrates. A lot of foods have a percentage of all macros and are referred to in whatever the highest macro is. Vegetarians may eat vegetables that are high in protein to get their daily protein intake - but still have carbs as their largest percentage of macro. One odd one out are soybeans - very large fat content: https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2623/2

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16 hours ago, eezergood said:

Do you cook your meat? if so why? this is processed food..........

 

Fruits have high (relatively & some) carbs but they also have fibre.... 

 

you state that cutting out wheat & other seeds will leave you better off - how so? could you quantify this?

 

So who knew why cutting out seeds maybe a good idea?

The protein Gluten is often blamed, but is it the only villain?

 

Italians remove the skin and seeds from tomatoes and are careful to fully cook beans.

 

Well, that is where the highest concentration of the protein lectin is found.

 

The Lectins proteins provide a form of defense in plants to keep insects away.

These proteins also contain nitrogen, which is needed for plants to grow.

While many parts of plants contain lectins, the seed is the part that people eat most often.

Lectins may impact health in multiple ways, ranging from poor digestion to chronic disease risk.

They have been shown to cause red blood cells to cluster together.

They are categorized as antinutrients since they block the absorption of some important nutrients.

Lectins may cause an upset stomach when plant foods are eaten uncooked.

They are also the reason why it can be dangerous to eat undercooked legumes.

As an example, the lectin in red kidney beans is called phytohaemagglutinin.

It is responsible for red kidney bean poisoning, which results from eating raw or undercooked kidney beans. Consuming just four raw kidney beans could cause symptoms including severe nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea.

However, consuming small amounts of lectins could have a beneficial effect and may help the good bacteria that live in human digestive systems.

As to cooking meat:
Meats, such as beef, pork, and chicken, can contain harmful bacteria and parasites. If eaten raw, these bacteria and parasites could make you really sick. When you cook meat properly, though, any harmful organisms are killed during the cooking process, allowing you to eat the cooked meat safely.

You should hardly call that processed?

IMHO, processed really means a procedure that adds or subtracts from the original product.

Like the salts, preservatives, colouring, flavours etc that are added to pork to make York Ham for instance.

 

Flesh contains enzymes that are released when the flesh is dead (and especially when meat is pulverised) the enzymes are there to help the dead meat breakdown more easily.

These enzymes make the meat more tender to eat.

Same as if you use a lemon juice marinade, the sinews in the meat start to break down into a soft jelly so the cooked meet falls apart and is not stringy.

(yeah, yeah, my ex was a nutritionist and I'm a mine of useless information LOL .....)

 

 

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20 hours ago, eezergood said:

Do you cook your meat? if so why? this is processed food..........

 

Fruits have high (relatively & some) carbs but they also have fibre.... 

 

you state that cutting out wheat & other seeds will leave you better off - how so? could you quantify this?

I usually eat my beef like jerky. Air dried. Salted with spices. Processed food is not well defined. Modifying an apple by cutting it is processing it, right. I'm not so much fussed on the word processed but look at the chemicals individually.

Carbon hydrogen substances that encourage an insulin response is not ideal. It's the body trying to repair something that went wrong. I.e. too much glucose in the blood.

The reaction to the action of me eating carbs is mild acne, feeling of heaviness, unclear tired mind, more unregular toilet experience, etc.

Yes fruit has fibre but I look at the carb to benefit ratio. Fruit has too many carbs. If I need fibre I get it from veg and psyllium husk.

At the end of the day I'm not saying either way is right or wrong, but if you don't try staying in deep ketosis for a few weeks you'll never know how better you will feel. And you must know for sure by testing. Ketosis is easy to fall out of. It takes massive discipline to start with but gets easier. To those happy on carbs. Great , you are lucky. To those who react badly to carbs and are overweight or simply feel tired all the time You do have a good option. Atkins helped me a lot.

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21 hours ago, eezergood said:

Calories are king - reduce calories and your weight will reduce (in a nutshell)

There lies the problem. Who can stop at one piece of chocolate cake.

What is more likely. Being able to eat 500 grams of chocolate in one sitting or 500 grams of cheese? Stay away from carbs/sugar for long enough and the craving subsides. For those who can control a small carb intake. Your a better human than me.

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2 hours ago, stud858 said:

There lies the problem. Who can stop at one piece of chocolate cake.

What is more likely. Being able to eat 500 grams of chocolate in one sitting or 500 grams of cheese? Stay away from carbs/sugar for long enough and the craving subsides. For those who can control a small carb intake. Your a better human than me.

Control is a totally different animal TOTALLY agree - however the meta analysis of numerous studies is clear low vs high has no impact. HOWEVER if you find it easier to stick to a low carb diet - this is is the one for you, if not then you are setting your self up to fail.

 

My issue with low carb ( i personally use low carb also) is that people with limited knowledge (too lazy to discover actually) believe it to be a panacea

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27 minutes ago, eezergood said:

Control is a totally different animal TOTALLY agree - however the meta analysis of numerous studies is clear low vs high has no impact. HOWEVER if you find it easier to stick to a low carb diet - this is is the one for you, if not then you are setting your self up to fail.

 

My issue with low carb ( i personally use low carb also) is that people with limited knowledge (too lazy to discover actually) believe it to be a panacea

Besides, the control issue the point where most people who try low carb will fail is that they are definitely eating low carb but not eating low enough to get into ketosis. In that case low carb and high carb will make you feel the same because your body is still running off glucose rather than fat.

It's a must to use ketostix to check you are burning fat for fuel.

 

Had anybody seen the fit to fat to fit show.

Very inspiring. But more related to exercise rather than diet.

I tear up when I watch it.

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On 8/27/2018 at 8:54 PM, chiangrai said:

Thanks,I will try that app.

I have been on google and found that I cup of cooked oats is 33gm of carb

                                                                    I cup of cooked buckwheat is about the same

                                                                    1 cup of white rice is 55gm carb

So 1 cup of any of these is o.k for 1 meal,3 times a day and is quick to measure.

Does that sound right to you.

 

The next thing I need to do is measure noodles,dried brown rice noodles and fresh rice noodles.I wil probably have to weigh them which won't be as convenient as measuring a cup.

Any ideas...............

 

 

All of these foods mentioned above and in your OP are entirely wrong for a carb restricted diet. 

 

Oats or any grain are stuffed with carbs.  

 

If you do the keto diet as I have with great success, then you should have no more than 20 grams of carbs a day.  If you just want to do low-carb, then 50 - 100 grams  day is OK.  

 

But first, whatever you do, find out which foods are OK to eat and which aren't.  

 

 

carbs per day chart.jpg

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On 11/14/2018 at 9:17 AM, Mister Fixit said:

All of these foods mentioned above and in your OP are entirely wrong for a carb restricted diet. 

 

Oats or any grain are stuffed with carbs.  

 

If you do the keto diet as I have with great success, then you should have no more than 20 grams of carbs a day.  If you just want to do low-carb, then 50 - 100 grams  day is OK.  

 

But first, whatever you do, find out which foods are OK to eat and which aren't.  

 

 

carbs per day chart.jpg

For the "average" male around 180/182 ish they are to consume 1500 cal per day? I can assure you, that if they really consume 1500 cal/day it will NOT MATTER where these calories come from Keto or otherwise. Weight loss will occur! Sticking to this however is a totally different matter. 

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20 hours ago, eezergood said:

For the "average" male around 180/182 ish they are to consume 1500 cal per day? I can assure you, that if they really consume 1500 cal/day it will NOT MATTER where these calories come from Keto or otherwise. Weight loss will occur! Sticking to this however is a totally different matter. 

I saw Dr oz on TV today stating that doctors views on calories in and calories out has changed. I guess the doctors he talks to anyway.  I don't need a doctor to tell me how my body reacts to 2000 calories of wheat, sugars and in general carby foods to 2000 calories fats proteins V&M and fibre in the longer term.

 

The hurdle is beating the carb crash for the first few weeks. I'm not disciplined enough to do Keto unless I'm in a comfortable not stressed mood.  No doubt the donut wins in the stressful times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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