Jump to content
New Hosting Read more... ×
BANGKOK 19 January 2019 11:57
nausea

Walk around

Recommended Posts

How do you say "walk around" in Thai. The other day I went to the local market and my SO asked me what I was doing, and I said "oh, just walking around" - she said you mean Dern L.. L.. .Now usually I can get it after a few repeatings, but this time I'm totally flummoxed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try:

 

เดินเที่ยว dəən-tîiao vi.
promenade (roam); ramble (walk for pleasure)

 

เดินเล่น dəən-lên vi.
go for a walk; promenade (take a walk); ramble (walk for pleasure); saunter (stroll); stroll; wander (take a walk)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

เดินไปเดินมา walk back and forth
เดินไปเทียว go out walking for fun
เดินไปเชยๆ เชิยๆ ?? not sure spelling on "chery" walking meaningless without purpose, "for fun"
เดินรอบๆ walk around and around, circling

seeing as you heard "dern l.." likely "dern len" as translated above. Perfect translation is our semi retired English word saunter.

Next time confuse her statement by saying "ไม่ไช่ แค่เดินเชยๆ"

mai chai, kay dern chery chery

"Nah, I just walking aimlessly"

(as saunter implies purpose, the purpose of fun)


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, surfdog said:

เดินไปเดินมา walk back and forth
เดินไปเทียว go out walking for fun
เดินไปเชยๆ เชิยๆ ?? not sure spelling on "chery" walking meaningless without purpose, "for fun"
เดินรอบๆ walk around and around, circling

seeing as you heard "dern l.." likely "dern len" as translated above. Perfect translation is our semi retired English word saunter.

Next time confuse her statement by saying "ไม่ไช่ แค่เดินเชยๆ"

mai chai, kay dern chery chery

"Nah, I just walking aimlessly"

(as saunter implies purpose, the purpose of fun)


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

เฉยๆ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks Pete! coudn't find it in the dictionary but now know why. Another example of how knowing the spelling can better my speaking, for me I always heard "ช" but obvious now to me it is a bit softer.


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

chery chery = เฉยๆ

If you're not sure of the spelling try talking into 'Google translate' app on your smartphone.

It often gets the right spelling, although the translation is often wrong.

Edited by BritManToo
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

เฉยๆ isn’t softer than เชยๆ, it just has a different tone...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can you explain how the tones are different? I actually see it (opening of mouth) and hear it as a different consonant altogether.


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you ask a Thai to say the consonants in isolation I think they will say them both the same (apart from the tone), but in real life some words with ช often seem to get pronounced with a sh sound (เชียงไหม่ for example), while others always have the harder ch sound (ช้าง). I can't think of any words with ฉ that get pronounced with the sh sound though. That doesn't mean there aren't any, but it could be the difference surfdog is on about.

 

Maybe the ch only gets softened when the word has a mid tone, which won't happen if it's spelt with ฉ. Don't know, just flying a kite on that one.

 

I don't think Thais can hear much of a difference, because they never hear the difference between English words like shoe and chew. For them I think it's basically the same consonant, much like ป and ผ are basically the same to us, at least before we start in on Thai.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you ask a Thai to say the consonants in isolation I think they will say them both the same (apart from the tone), but in real life some words with ช often seem to get pronounced with a sh sound (เชียงไหม่ for example), while others always have the harder ch sound (ช้าง). I can't think of any words with ฉ that get pronounced with the sh sound though. That doesn't mean there aren't any, but it could be the difference surfdog is on about.

 

Maybe the ch only gets softened when the word has a mid tone, which won't happen if it's spelt with ฉ. Don't know, just flying a kite on that one.

 

I don't think Thais can hear much of a difference, because they never hear the difference between English words like shoe and chew. For them I think it's basically the same consonant, much like ป and ผ are basically the same to us, at least before we start in on Thai.

 

Thai's are taught they are different, but unless you are a newscaster are not annunciated due to lazy speaking. For example I wrote เดินเชยๆ because that is what I heard, but เชย means old fashioned. That I have got away with mispronouncing because when I use in context it is clear, because เชย is used more like a standalone adjective. I know and use เชย be ause when said it is said long and annunciated like you are disgusted. Old fashioned in Thai from what I've seen is insulting btw :)

 

So my curiousity asked the misses how do I pronounce เดินเชยๆ and she replies great you got it. But then I asked spell it, and oh how is that different from ช. Then all of a sudden she is annunciated it for me and saying เดินเฉยๆ and showing what must do to say ฉ

 

You make a frown and lower tongue to bottom of mouth to pronounce differently, it is not our "sh" sound and it is not our "ch" sound. Wife explained this is how kids are taught in schools to speak "properly".

 

Best example I think is ชั้น and ฉัน yes vowels are different but I can always hear the consonant difference in ฉ when used in ฉัน.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Sorry to butt in. I was told by a Thai along time ago that เชยฯ cherย cherย means pipe down , not so fast, calm down. The kind of thing I say to an over zealous salesperson on entering the shop or to calm a situation maybe two people holding each others hair maybe and always got an acknowledging smile or loosening of grip so I'm sure I'm correct in its use. And the Paiboon dictionary app girl pronounces it spot on, anyone come across it ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

เชย in popular use to mean antiquated/quaint is only around 80 year old, it was popularized by a novel series พล นิกร กิมหงวน where there's a character named ลุงเชย or uncle choey that is from upcountry and acts quaints, and thus the word become associated with quaintness 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
เชย in popular use to mean antiquated/quaint is only around 80 year old, it was popularized by a novel series พล นิกร กิมหงวน where there's a character named ลุงเชย or uncle choey that is from upcountry and acts quaints, and thus the word become associated with quaintness 

where you at is it used negatively? like a step down from บ้านหนอก or even equal.

Most commonly I see เชย used to refer to fashion.


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, surfdog said:


where you at is it used negatively? like a step down from บ้านหนอก or even equal.

Most commonly I see เชย used to refer to fashion.


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

Yes, but even the word เชย has become out of fashion too, kids these days have many exciting words to describe being 'out', เฉิ่ม เห่ย

 

anyway, to get back on topic, while เฉยๆ is a perfectly good adjective/adverb, it is not normally used to describe walking

 

เดินเล่น is more commonly seen 

 

maybe you could answer เดินเฉยๆ when asked how did you trip up and fall on top of the housecat when going to get something from the fridge. เดินเฉยๆ doesn't inply intent but whereas เดินเล่น would satisfy the asking party more with why would you be out in the midday sun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/5/2019 at 5:52 PM, Percy Penguin said:

If you ask a Thai to say the consonants in isolation I think they will say them both the same (apart from the tone), but in real life some words with ช often seem to get pronounced with a sh sound (เชียงไหม่ for example), while others always have the harder ch sound (ช้าง). I can't think of any words with ฉ that get pronounced with the sh sound though. That doesn't mean there aren't any, but it could be the difference surfdog is on about.

 

Maybe the ch only gets softened when the word has a mid tone, which won't happen if it's spelt with ฉ. Don't know, just flying a kite on that one.

 

I don't think Thais can hear much of a difference, because they never hear the difference between English words like shoe and chew. For them I think it's basically the same consonant, much like ป and ผ are basically the same to us, at least before we start in on Thai.

You could consider ฉ ช to have same consonant sounds,

but ฉ is of higher tone, or considered to have higher base tone

where as ช is of the lowest tone

 

musically maybe it's like they are on a different key  ฉัน (me/myself) vs ชัน (steep) ชั้น (shelves/level) no matter how high vowel you add to ช you can never get it to sound like ฉ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×