Jump to content

Education - Thailand or abroad for your child?


Recommended Posts

As explained to me by a teacher at an International School, if it's your plan for child to attend Thai University then an English Program type school is best where they will have both a good command of both Thai and English. An excellent understanding of English will set them apart in Thailand when seeking employment.

If your child will be attending a western university, then an International School is best.

 

Then the discussion will turn to where the highest paid jobs are. But I for one believes Thailand is a better choice, not because the pay is higher but because it's less stressful here. She wouldn't have much in the way of family in the US, seems logical to keep her in Thailand.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 45
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Hmmm just being having this discussion in another thread.

So situation was this;
My son was born in Singapore and went to school there until the age of 10, went we came back to Thailand. He then went through the High School until he went to college in Chicago.
His primary education in Singapore was outstanding.
It all went downhill when we came back to Thailand.
We had sent him to a private International school in Khon Kaen, but in reality all I did was buy better quality friends, the education was just as mediocre as the rest.
Obviously he was totally fluent in English, yet reading the 'corrections' to his English homework were past laughable, it bordered on tragic.
So fast forward to college, he passed the entrance exam to the University of Chicago, thanks primarily to his Mom's tutoring.
His freshman year however was really really tough, he struggled mightily.
The Thai way of instilling information without any real critical thinking is just so contrary to a US university environment, it took him a year to get his head around it.
Now he was lucky. At the time my eldest daughter was living in Chicago and helped get him through it.

So, we're a bit different to you. He was a US citizen, and we now have moved back, he's got a great job and we're quite close to him

But, a degree from a Thai university is really not worth the paper it's printed on outside of Thailand, I think you've seen all the stats.

So ask yourself what you want for her future, and I guess, ask yourself if you will remain in Thailand forever.

If I had to do it all over again, I wish we'd moved back before he started HS

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I was just thinking out loud when I posted. I heard many posters argue that regular Gov schools are just as good EP or International schools, I can't buy into that.

 

Yes, your situation is different but I can understand your frustration at the Thai way of teaching. They learn to spell words they don't know the meaning of is one example.

 

As dumb as it sounds, if I had a son instead I'd be thinking more seriously about a western education.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, EVENKEEL said:

Guess I was just thinking out loud when I posted. I heard many posters argue that regular Gov schools are just as good EP or International schools, I can't buy into that.

 

Yes, your situation is different but I can understand your frustration at the Thai way of teaching. They learn to spell words they don't know the meaning of is one example.

 

As dumb as it sounds, if I had a son instead I'd be thinking more seriously about a western education.

In truth I can’t compare Govt schools and private schools, since all the time after we moved from Singapore Voy was in a private school.

Now my comparison would be therefore between a HS in the US and his private school in Thailand.

 

In that scenario, it was night and day. Without me and his Mom sorta filling in the gaps as best we could, I’m pretty sure he would have been 2 years behind a typical US HS graduate

Link to post
Share on other sites

My Thai kids will be living and working in Thailand so they go to Thai government schools.  If I wanted them to be worthless layabouts, I'd send them to some 'spoilt brat' Thai school.  If they were going to be living and working in the UK I would have sent them to school in the UK.

 

My daughter has made it through Doi Saket Temple junior school, Mae Rim HighSchool, and now half way through Chiang Mai University. Top of her class all the way, it isn't about their school, it's about the work ethic you instil in them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I mentored a young Thai woman in obtaining her Thai government scholarship to attend the London School of Economics and then eventually receive a law degree from City University, London. She was valedictorian of her public high school class in Thailand.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2018 at 8:33 PM, BritManToo said:

My Thai kids will be living and working in Thailand so they go to Thai government schools.  If I wanted them to be worthless layabouts, I'd send them to some 'spoilt brat' Thai school.  If they were going to be living and working in the UK I would have sent them to school in the UK.

 

My daughter has made it through Doi Saket Temple junior school, Mae Rim HighSchool, and now half way through Chiang Mai University. Top of her class all the way, it isn't about their school, it's about the work ethic you instil in them.

These are your biological kids I'm assuming, your daughter has the advantage of having an English speaking father at home. A good education doesn't produce worthless layabouts. It's the home environment which promotes laziness. For mine an International School may happen later after she has a good grasp on the Thai basics. But for now it's an English Program School with native English teachers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, EVENKEEL said:

Guess I was just thinking out loud when I posted. I heard many posters argue that regular Gov schools are just as good EP or International schools, I can't buy into that.

 

Yes, your situation is different but I can understand your frustration at the Thai way of teaching. They learn to spell words they don't know the meaning of is one example.

 

As dumb as it sounds, if I had a son instead I'd be thinking more seriously about a western education.

 

Just to confuse, nowadays there's a network of government schools where English is the main medium of teaching and most have good quality western teachers for: Maths, Science, English and some also have limited history and geography lessons in English and at least one of these schools has a subject called 'society' which I understand is meaning something like sociology, taught in English. Thai language is taught by Thai teachers. 

 

Two such schools that I'm personally aware of are in Chiang Mai and Pitsanalook, and I understand there are more. Semester fees at the CM school are around 20,000Baht a semester and class maximum is 24 students. 

 

I visited the above school in CM with my Thai son to enquire about their EP program for my eldest granddaughter. My son was shocked to find a reception room where there are many young Thai admin. staff who all speak English, one pleasant guy (relatively young, perhaps late 20s) said good morning and asked my son and myself to sit down and he said 'How can we help you?' (A change from the typical 'fill in the form' appraoch at older style schools), the whole team quickly came and sat with us, they listened well they spoke professionally and politely and most of them contributed something valuable to the discussion which lasted about 30 - 40 minutes. Then we were given business cards and the lead guy said 'don't hesitate to call me with more questions and discussion'. Both my Son and myself quite impressed. 

 

Then one of the team took us to an English language class and she politely ask if 2 of the students could come out of the class for 15 minutes to give my son and myself a quick tour around the school. Two very pleasant 16 yr old girls, excellent English, very focused, very adult appraoch to giving us the quick tour. Very well done.

 

I have a close western friend who has worked at the above school in Pitsanalook for around 10 years, this school has an excellent track record of kids getting accepted into Chula, Thammasat, Mahidol Medical School, etc.

 

Within the same grounds there's an old style Thai government school, until I guess 2 or 3 years back that school had no western teachers and was a 100% rote learning environment but it seems there has been effective pressure from the parents who are well aware of the EP school within walking distance and how it works and the old style school now has 2 western teachers, English and Maths / Science, much more student participation and the class sizes have reduced markedly. 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its just over a year ago now that my daughter decided she wanted to be taught in England and came here to continue her education, she has grown exponentially. Would she wish to return to Thailand to go to school? The answer from her is a very strong "No!" For me, your main issue is that you and your children are expending all your efforts to ensure that eventually your child can operate as a person in English, but you are moving in a narrow corridor defined by the environment you are within. In your home country English is the canvas on which life and education is painted so it matters not how good the school is in Thailand, your child will be forever restrained. My daughter can read, write and speak both Thai and English and still struggles in general conversation when people talk fast, use vernacular dialects or the conversation moves to unfamiliar areas, these issues will be resolved with time spent amongst her peers and are not something that an international school can resolve. If you are defining your child's life as 'do well in Thailand' then an education in Thailand may be right, however if you would like your child to be able to flourish anywhere then I would strongly recommend you move your child home, mine is now learning French, which she enjoys, along with dance, drama and a myriad of subjects which in an English school (also European or American) are simply a part of normal school life, but most importantly she is learning to think for herself. Best wishes on what you decide.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, BritManToo said:

How many of those 'native English teachers' are qualified to teach in their home country?

I'd prefer my kids not to mix with the foreigners pretending to be teachers in Thailand while eking out an existence between being drunk and chasing bar girls.

 

Here's an example, years back a farang colleague introduced me to his loud-mouth over-confident younger brother who had been working in Bkk for I guess 6 months for a mickey-mouse English teacher agency, no qualifications, no previous experience, no work permits etc. 

 

The younger brother had just landed a contract to teach English to young naval cadets. The elder brother asked 'how are you constructing the lessons' or something similar.

 

Younger brothers' answer: 'I'm teaching them the language of masturbation and sex'. We all laughed then the 'teacher' said 'I'm serious'.

 

A few days later my colleague revealed that the naval college had dismissed his young brother on the spot when they learned what he was teaching.

 

No further comment needed. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, BritManToo said:

How many of those 'native English teachers' are qualified to teach in their home country?

I'd prefer my kids not to mix with the foreigners pretending to be teachers in Thailand while eking out an existence between being drunk and chasing bar girls.

Four in my office are (most of the native speakers). Most of the non-natives are also qualified to teach in their home country. The layabouts don't last very long as the work is too demanding. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We looked into both international and government schools with English programs for our two sons. When I found it difficult to have a fluent conversation in English with any of the main teachers...I realised we were potentially making a huge mistake and decided to stay in Australia. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, nataliecooke said:

We looked into both international and government schools with English programs for our two sons. When I found it difficult to have a fluent conversation in English with any of the main teachers...I realised we were potentially making a huge mistake and decided to stay in Australia. 

Like I’ve said before I’d have done it totally differently if I could.

 

With hindsight I wish we’d either stayed in Singapore or moved directly back to the US.

 

As it happens, it all worked out but it was probably harder than it needed to be with our diversion to Thailand.

 

Of course my wife reminds me constantly, not that I remember this conversation, that she told me so!

 

The education standards and mentality are so radically different it’s hard to wrap your head around it.

 

I guess bottom line is this. If your kid is never wanting to move and work outside Thailand, yeah it probably works. 

If they have any aspiration to work outside the country, then get them to college outside Thailand

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many different international schools in Thailand, some good, most bad.

The problem with the good ones is that by hiring qualified teachers from the UK, Australia, NZ, the US, etc., who demand salaries that can approach or surpass 100K baht/month, they are quite expensive by Thai - but not US - standards.

The better International schools also have plenty of support staff, from teachers' assistants to counselors. Tuitions in Bangkok approach 1 million baht/year; and even upcountry they often exceed 500-800K baht/year depending on boarding.

However, these schools do get results in terms of acceptance by top notch world universities, such as Ivy Leagues in the US or equivalent in Asia and Europe, as long as the student is motivated.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...