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BANGKOK 17 July 2019 18:19
pehice

Cabbage pesticide level in Thailand ? Is this vegetable more or less poisoned ?

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hello, anybody growing cabbage ? do you know if this is a vegetable that needs lots of pesticides ? or it quite safe to eat ?

 

 

Thank you.

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1 hour ago, drtreelove said:

I understand the negative viewpoint; it is surely a reality and matter of concern, if that's as far as you can see. 

 

But there are good things going on and growers who care and know and are trying to do the right thing.  I recently visited a 120 rai organic farm in Chiang Mai province and saw real soil building (up to 5% sustained soil organic matter content) and chemical pesticide free, profitable production.  And there are many more if you seek them out. There are growers from Issan on this forum who you shouldn't place in that dim context. 

 

Another member recently posted about a successful program he manages to reverse and revive HLB (citrus greening) disease infected citrus trees with a comprehensive organic program. 

 

CLW's masters degree project may become a benchmark for organic methods and materials for Thai vegetable growers. 

 

It's always best and most dependable to grow your own if you have the land and resources.  There is plenty of information available.  It's the reason that this sub-forum was formed almost 10 years ago, to share information on organic and small scale farming/gardening.  Let's keep it positive, pass the word, and keep it growing!  

UN Tropical Organics.pdf

Have you got a link to the member posting about HLB please.

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4 hours ago, grollies said:

Have you got a link to the member posting about HLB please.

It may have been only in his PM to me and resulting email conversation.  I'll send you that contact info. 

It was the first I'd heard of a successful "curative" program, with 15 years of field-trials in China, before and after photos to back it up.  There was no peer reviewed science available but that is not necessary to get my attention.  The focus on moving away from soil biology destruction from harsh chemical imputs, with comprehensive soil building work and IPM methods sounded believable to me. 

 

I don't believe the claims of HLB cure with stem injection of anti-biotics.  Maybe temporary suppression, but not long term cure, and surely not affordable to do continued repeated treatments. There will be serious side-effects from tissue necrosis associated with repeated injection sites. 

 

Trying to cure advanced plant pest and disease conditions is always a challenge. Prevention of course is the best way to go. In the case of HLB that means never letting an active psyllid vector infestation and bacterial infection get started.  I have suggestions for a comprehensive preventive organic program if you are interested.  Don  

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19 minutes ago, drtreelove said:

It may have been only in his PM to me and resulting email conversation.  I'll send you that contact info. 

It was the first I'd heard of a successful "curative" program, with 15 years of field-trials in China, before and after photos to back it up.  There was no peer reviewed science available but that is not necessary to get my attention.  The focus on moving away from soil biology destruction from harsh chemical imputs, with comprehensive soil building work and IPM methods sounded believable to me. 

 

I don't believe the claims of HLB cure with stem injection of anti-biotics.  Maybe temporary suppression, but not long term cure, and surely not affordable to do continued repeated treatments. There will be serious side-effects from tissue necrosis associated with repeated injection sites. 

 

Trying to cure advanced plant pest and disease conditions is always a challenge. Prevention of course is the best way to go. In the case of HLB that means never letting an active psyllid vector infestation and bacterial infection get started.  I have suggestions for a comprehensive preventive organic program if you are interested.  Don  

I'd be very interested in organic prevention measures. I've had some success clearing my citrus of canker and gummosis and I think there is some HLB around too. TIT and we are subject to most disease and pests, my take is that it's best to try and live with it and improve tree health to give them a chance to fight off disease. Pests have been a long battle but banning chemical pesticides has resulted in more predators like dragonfly, lizards and preying mantis around the place.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_pest-repelling_plants

 

Myself i'm testing peppermint to repel mosquito's..so far it works pretty good but i'm still testing it. I just have some plants near me outside. Also basil and rosemary.

 

For cabbage there are good other companion plants...catnip and so.

 

Don't know if the farmers in Isan have ever tried it but in the West it's used a lot to grow cabbages.

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On 11/28/2018 at 6:00 PM, grollies said:

I'd be very interested in organic prevention measures.

Neem!

 

The Neem tree grows in Thailand. Find one and strip a bunch of leaves. Pound and grind the leaves in a mortar and pestle like they use for making somdam and then soak it in hot water. Strain the water and put it in a backpack or hand sprayer depending on how much you need and spray it on anything you need to keep pests away from. 

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On 12/5/2018 at 10:02 PM, vinegarbase said:

Neem!

 

The Neem tree grows in Thailand. Find one and strip a bunch of leaves. Pound and grind the leaves in a mortar and pestle like they use for making somdam and then soak it in hot water. Strain the water and put it in a backpack or hand sprayer depending on how much you need and spray it on anything you need to keep pests away from. 

Yep, I do neem already. Managed to find a supplier. 

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Grollies

22 hours ago, grollies said:

Yep, I do neem already. Managed to find a supplier. 

I live in Issan. Could I get a link or contact number for your supplier of NEEM?

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1 hour ago, nervona81732 said:

Grollies

I live in Issan. Could I get a link or contact number for your supplier of NEEM?

Until about 2 years ago, I would see bottles of Neem concentrate in the garden aisle of larger Tesco or Big C. Sadly these areas of the store are slowly disappearing.

 

I see one listing on NanaGarden.com (Thai language)

 

https://www.nanagarden.com/search/neem

 

Also, insect pests are especially bad during the dry season, as nothing else is growing except your nice green juicy vegetables. Kaolin clay diluted in water and sprayed on leaves leaves a white film which both protects from heat stress and discourages insect pests and is totally benign. The kaolin is a fine but rugged abrasive and insects will stay away. Drip irrigation saves water and works best to keep the kaolin film on the leaves.

 

https://plantcaretoday.com/kaolin-clay.html

 

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