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BANGKOK 23 May 2019 04:29
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No water for irrigation this dry season

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No water for irrigation this dry season

By PRATCH RUJIVANAROM 
THE NATION 

 

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FILE photo

 

BUT TAPS WILL NOT RUN DRY AS THERE IS ENOUGH FOR CONSUMPTION, ECOSYSTEM CARE
 

THERE WILL be enough water for consumption for everybody this dry season, the Royal Irrigation Department (RID) assured, despite the fact that water reserves in many dams are running low. 

 

Thongplew Kongjun, RID director-general, assured the public yesterday that the country will have enough water for domestic consumption and businesses during this dry season, though farmers in some parts of the country cannot plant a dry-season crop, due to insufficient water for irrigation.

 

He said that water levels in Mae Mok Dam in Sukhothai and the Ubonrat Dam in Khon Kaen were low, holding 28 per cent and 10 per cent of their capacity respectively.

 

Farmers in the irrigation zone of these dams will not have water for farming, but there was enough water to feed household taps and to retain the ecosystem, he said. 

 

“We are certain that there were be enough water for consumption for the rest of this dry season until the rains come in May,” he said. 

 

“Nevertheless, we encourage people to use water wisely, while we also encourage farmers to grow crops that consume less water such as maize instead of rice.”

 

According to the RID, the authorities have earmarked 23.1 billion cubic metres of water for the entire country during the dry season, which runs from November 1 to April 30. Reservoirs now have 36.5 billion cubic metres available nationwide.

 

Water allocated to the Chao Phraya River Basin for all purposes will be 8 billion cubic metres, the RID reported, while the currently available water in the basin sits at 12.4 billion cubic metres.

 

Low water levels in reservoirs

 

However, the Smart Water Operation Centre has reported that many of the reservoirs have very low levels. 

 

According to the water situation report, five large dams, namely Mae Mok Dam (28 per cent), Sirindhorn Dam (25 per cent), Thab Salao Dam (21 per cent), Kraseaw Dam (13 per cent) and Ubonrat Dam (10 per cent), were less than 30-per-cent full.

 

In addition, 36 medium-sized reservoirs are also less than 30-per-cent full. 

 

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Given the low level of water available, the RID has released water-management procedures, saying dams that are less than 60 per cent full should be very careful about discharging water so as to avoid the risk of drought. Dams in the Northeast, which regularly suffers drought, should be particularly careful.

 

The RID also calls for reservoirs with levels under 30 per cent, to discharge water for domestic consumption and ecosystem retention only.

 

Thongplew also revealed that the RID has already planned many new large-scale irrigation projects in every region to cope with upcoming drought issues.

 

He said many projects had already passed the Environmental Impact Assessment process and were ready to begin construction within the next year, including the Sri Songrak Watergate in Loei and Lam Saphung Reservoir in Chaiyaphum.

 

Full story: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30359404

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-11-28

 

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I won't  be using much water this year.ive got 2 government taps and meters but nothing has come out of them for over 10 years.i reckon they installed the taps and meters and got everyone to sign then had the pump disappear.

Edited by happy chappie
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Next weeks headline ''Songkran extended 3 extra days''...

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1 hour ago, Borzandy said:

Only 2 months ago the dams were full.....find the mistake.

The very biggest dam in thailand is 92% full as of today. Some parts of thailand were wet, some parts were dry. So now some dams have a lot of water and others don't. 

 

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20 minutes ago, Srikcir said:

Time to deploy the Royal Rainmaking Air Force!

Oooooh, that one never gets old! 

:cheesy:

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2 hours ago, Borzandy said:

Only 2 months ago the dams were full.....find the mistake.

they could run a drunks party at a brewery ..

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2 hours ago, Borzandy said:

Only 2 months ago the dams were full.....find the mistake.

The mistake is that they have the wrong people for the water management .The water management is suppose to make sure that there are enough dams build,make sure that they are big enough,make sure that they are in the right place and make sure that they can supply enough water for at least 50 years plus. Or built some pipelines so that they can pump water when they need it from the big rivers.

Edited by digger70
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So after all of the flooding there is a problem with water for farming? Is this because the flooding all took place away from the farming areas or is it because the government has not taken any initiative to build retention damns and reservoirs to minimize flooding and allow for rice to be grown all year round?

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13 hours ago, Borzandy said:

Only 2 months ago the dams were full.....find the mistake.

 

No they were not. Some were but most were not.

 

Try looking here http://www.thaiwater.net/DATA/REPORT/php/rid_dam_1.php?lang=en

 

and here http://www.thaiwater.net/DATA/REPORT/php/show_sm_dam.php?lang=en

 

I live in rural Khampaeng Phet and the rainfall this year is lower than 2017 and 2016.

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10 hours ago, digger70 said:

The mistake is that they have the wrong people for the water management .The water management is suppose to make sure that there are enough dams build,make sure that they are big enough,make sure that they are in the right place and make sure that they can supply enough water for at least 50 years plus. Or built some pipelines so that they can pump water when they need it from the big rivers.

They do have most of the right people in the right places but the problem is that politicians over rule the management.

 

You suggest that pipelines be put in place to pump water.

 

Have you any idea how much it will cost to pump water 1,000 km from the south to the north of Thailand? How much logistics are involved in doing that? How much land would have to be purchased, how much earth would have to be moved, how many pumping stations would be required, how many extra power stations would be needed, how much weight of water has to be moved? 

 

I will give you a small clue. 1 cubic meter of water weighs 1 ton.

 

To move that water 1,000 km means that you need to pump 1,000 tons of water and you will need a whole lot of big pumps to do that.

 

The cost to build 2 metre pipes and you will need perhaps 4 pipes to pump it will cost billions of baht, and that would be a simple south to north pipeline and then you will also need east/west lines which add to the cost. 

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2 hours ago, billd766 said:

They do have most of the right people in the right places but the problem is that politicians over rule the management.

 

You suggest that pipelines be put in place to pump water.

 

Have you any idea how much it will cost to pump water 1,000 km from the south to the north of Thailand? How much logistics are involved in doing that? How much land would have to be purchased, how much earth would have to be moved, how many pumping stations would be required, how many extra power stations would be needed, how much weight of water has to be moved? 

 

I will give you a small clue. 1 cubic meter of water weighs 1 ton.

 

To move that water 1,000 km means that you need to pump 1,000 tons of water and you will need a whole lot of big pumps to do that.

 

The cost to build 2 metre pipes and you will need perhaps 4 pipes to pump it will cost billions of baht, and that would be a simple south to north pipeline and then you will also need east/west lines which add to the cost. 

With a 36" pipe, 132,000 cubic meters can be moved per day, perhaps more. So in 6 months, 23 million cubic meters can moved. There are specialized trenching machines for digging the trench, laying such a pipe, and returning ground cover. It's not such a complex job as some may think and it has been done many many times. US and Canada have lots of expertise in laying pipelines. Russia has experts too. The XL pipeline, Canada to USA will be built in phases and the first phase is 3,400 km. It is reasonable and feasible to lay a 1,000 km pipe to move about 23 million cubic meters in 6 months. Additional smaller pipelines will be need for distribution. If there is a will there is a way to accomplish the job. Estimated cost USD $1-2 billion.

Edited by Banana7
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