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BANGKOK 26 April 2019 19:39
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Extreme Brexit could be worse than financial crisis for UK: BoE

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15 hours ago, samran said:

No.

 

Thailand and Malaysia can’t even agree to let each other’s tour busses and lorries enter each other territory beyond certain limits.

 

Thai cars aren’t even allowed onto Vietnamese roads. 

 

Australia cant negotiate to get a higher quota of beef into thailand tariff free. Under current rules the tariff free quota is snapped up by the 10th of January each year.

 

That FTA was scheduled - as per the actual FTA text - to be reviewed 4 years ago. Do you think they’ve even had a meeting?

 

Silly examples such as this are much more the norm of the brave new world you are entering. 

 

 

 

 

Australia shipping beef to Thailand or Thailand and Malaysia can’t even agree to let each other’s tour busses and lorries enter each other territory beyond certain limits.

 

Thai cars aren’t even allowed onto Vietnamese roads. 

 

I have no idea what that has to do with Brexit at all but I am sure you can explain it somehow.

 

 

14 hours ago, damascase said:

wrong post. Sorry.

 

Edited by billd766
Edited for bad spelling after I had posted it

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14 hours ago, damascase said:

That’s not the way these things work in the EU. When the actual negotiations start, the - still - 28 Member States have already reached agreement on the framework and the desired content/scope/limits of the FTA. On that basis, the Commission gets a mandate to negotiate. Member States are permanently informed about the ongoing negotiations and have the power to change the approach, if and when deemed necessary. So they won’t be confronted with nasty surprises after these negotiations. Ratification can indeed be time-consuming, especially so when a government has failed to properly inform parliament about what was ongoing.

So how long DID it take for the EU to ratify the Canada treaty?

 

When the UK goes for a treaty with Canada, Australia, NZ etc there will only be 2 parties involved and NOT 28 or 27 so the time frame will be far less.

 

Unless you know something different.

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22 minutes ago, billd766 said:

Australia shipping beef to Thailand or Thailand and Malaysia can’t even agree to let each other’s tour busses and lorries enter each other territory beyond certain limits.

 

Thai cars aren’t even allowed onto Vietnamese roads. 

 

I have no idea what that has to do with Brexit at all but I am sure you can explain it somehow.

 

 

 

It isn’t rocket science to understand.

 

Other readers managed to figure out what I was saying...

 

All these things are fundamental elements of international trade. Transport, logistics, product quotas, quarantine rules and non-tariff barriers. 

 

Brexit you are out on your own in terms of making trade deals. No heft of the EU to make the deals as comprehensive as they can be. 

 

What you are left with, as a single country, is trying via ‘negotiations’ to get single issues through. 

 

You said that going that way would be faster than trying to negotiate with 20 something other EU members. 

 

I simply gave you some examples - practical real world examples - of what awaits UK trade negotiatiors in their brave post brexit world. You don’t get much in reality. 

Edited by samran

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1 hour ago, samran said:

It isn’t rocket science to understand.

 

Other readers managed to figure out what I was saying...

 

All these things are fundamental elements of international trade. Transport, logistics, product quotas, quarantine rules and non-tariff barriers. 

 

Brexit you are out on your own in terms of making trade deals. No heft of the EU to make the deals as comprehensive as they can be. 

 

What you are left with, as a single country, is trying via ‘negotiations’ to get single issues through. 

 

You said that going that way would be faster than trying to negotiate with 20 something other EU members. 

 

I simply gave you some examples - practical real world examples - of what awaits UK trade negotiatiors in their brave post brexit world. You don’t get much in reality. 

And like the rest of Brexit we are completely unprepared for trade - still have no idea what we want!

 

 

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1 hour ago, aright said:

We won't if we have leaders and negotiators with your doom and gloom outlook and level of ambition. 

If there was an Olympics for pessimism I would fancy your chances.

All the bullishness in the world does you no good when the other side simply won’t open proceedings.

 

And you don’t have your gun boats to intimidate them any more (though based on reading threads like this, plenty of people still think Empire 2.0 starts on the 30th of March). 

Edited by samran

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4 hours ago, Purdey said:

Bureaucrats cannot be voted out of office in the UK too.

I can see quite clearly that the CONs cut the deficit immediately they cam in to office 🙈

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13 minutes ago, samran said:

All the bullishness in the world does you no good when the other side simply won’t open proceedings.

 

And you don’t have your gun boats to intimidate them any more (though based on reading threads like this, plenty of people still think Empire 2.0 starts on the 30th of March). 

I agree the impasse is caused by the EU's intransigence. Good intentions aren't always enough are they?

Where is your evidence/link that plenty of people think empire starts on 30th March? It's at odds with what I hear in the Pub and read in the Press.

It has just been announced that UK Public Finance showed a record surplus of £14.9 billion last month which was £3 billion more than forecast...…. a disappointment and too pessimistic for you probably.

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27 minutes ago, samran said:

All the bullishness in the world does you no good when the other side simply won’t open proceedings.

 

And you don’t have your gun boats to intimidate them any more (though based on reading threads like this, plenty of people still think Empire 2.0 starts on the 30th of March). 

More real world values?

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46 minutes ago, aright said:

I agree the impasse is caused by the EU's intransigence. Good intentions aren't always enough are they?

Where is your evidence/link that plenty of people think empire starts on 30th March? It's at odds with what I hear in the Pub and read in the Press.

It has just been announced that UK Public Finance showed a record surplus of £14.9 billion last month which was £3 billion more than forecast...…. a disappointment and too pessimistic for you probably.

Go read the ‘leave’ manifesto. There was an assumption that world would rush to make trade deals with the UK. They won’t. You aren’t a super power any more. 

 

In terms of my quote. That lack of urgency from your trading ‘partners’ is what I was referring to. Your new trade reality. 

Edited by samran
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45 minutes ago, billd766 said:

quote "I simply gave you some examples - practical real world examples - of what awaits UK trade negotiatiors in their brave post brexit world. You don’t get much in reality."

 

You gave me some examples completely unrelated to Brexit which in the real world affect those countries involved.

 

Please tell me slowly and in simple terms what these have to do with Brexit and or the EU.

 

"Thailand and Malaysia can’t even agree to let each other’s tour busses and lorries enter each other territory beyond certain limits.

Thai cars aren’t even allowed onto Vietnamese roads."

 

AFAIR neither Thailand, Malaysia or Vietnam are in the EU so that is nothing to do with real world values and Brexit.

 

Australia exporting beef to the EU has a real world value because all 28 or 27 countries have a say in that deal.

 

But when the UK leaves the EU and wants to strike a deal with Australia there are only 2 countries involved in that deal, so there can be no way that a deal will take 5 or 10 years.

 

 

 

I’ll type this slowly so you can understand.

 

These examples will be the new british trade reality post brexit. That is how it relates. You’ll have your own versions of these soon enough. 

 

I typed that last bit really really slowly, just for you. 

 

The Australia US FTA became active in 2005. Formal talks started in 2001. The idea has been kicked about since the mid 1990s. So yes, they do take time. 

 

And the deal only came about in the end as Australia was part of the ‘coalition of the willing’ during the gulf war. And still, it is hardly ‘free’ in trade. Still lots of restrictions..

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia–United_States_Free_Trade_Agreement

Edited by samran

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