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Extreme Brexit could be worse than financial crisis for UK: BoE

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41 minutes ago, Chartist said:

 

Unfortunately if those were the options we'd likely end up with May's deal as remoaners would prefer a deal that benefits their unelected overlords than one that benefits their country.

Codswallop

 

You really need to take some time to read up on how the EU works

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45 minutes ago, vinny41 said:

Likewise if the people that voted in the 1975 referendum had a crystal ball to look into the future as see all the things they were told would never happen because there was this safeguard or that safeguard I am sure the 1975 vote would be leave would have won by a landslide

Within the EU we grew to have the fifth best economy in the world and were instrumental in shaping the EU.  Of course we chose the bits that we didn't want to be involved with like Shenzhen and not adopting the Euro.

 

42 minutes ago, Chartist said:

 

Unfortunately if those were the options we'd likely end up with May's deal as remoaners would prefer a deal that benefits their unelected overlords than one that benefits their country.

I think you will find there are just as many remainers who will vote against May's deal as there are leavers.  The deal let's both sides down. 

 

But the consensus seems to be that May's deal is better than a no-deal and all the chaos that that would cause.  That is what she is relying on and we are all being screwed in the process.

 

I try not to proclaim what leavers are thinking or feeling as I have no idea,  just like leavers have no idea what remainers think or feel.  Might be worth considering that.

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26 minutes ago, sandyf said:

Quite.

When people go into a restaurant why do they look at a menu,after all they have already decided to eat.

 

In 2016 David Cameron asked the people if they wanted to eat, on the basis that they would have to accept what was on the plate. Obviously many thought it would be fish and chips but now see the dish of the day is tripe, any wonder they are asking for the specials board.

 

 

A good description.

 

 

I would still vote again for the mystery dish.

 

 

A blind tasting can often be rewarding.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, candide said:

Well, even if the dish is still unknown, people now had plenty of time to have a look at the kitchen.....😷

 

 

There's some rats in that kitchen  🙂

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Posted (edited)

Private equity firm Bowmark Capital has just raised its largest ever fund of £600m in a mere 10 weeks to invest in UK mid-market companies. In the word of one of the managing partners:

 

“The success of the fund-raising demonstrates that the UK remains an attractive market for private equity, notwithstanding current Brexit uncertainties."

Edited by My Thai Life
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But bad news for the eurozone

 

Professor Otmar Issing, the founding chief economist of the European Central Bank and the chastened prophet of the euro project: “One day, the house of cards will collapse.”

 

And from the London School of Economics:

 

"The calamitous EMU saga has led to the “most serious economic crisis in the history of the European Union”. It has done “more lasting damage” to swaths of Europe than the Great Depression of the 1930s, and pitted eurozone states against each other in a bitter struggle for control over the levers of policy."

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2019/01/02/euro-has-failed-threatens-democracy-should-abolished/

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9 minutes ago, My Thai Life said:

Private equity firm Bowmark Capital has just raised its largest ever fund of £600m in a mere 10 weeks to invest in UK mid-market companies. In the word of one of the managing partners:

 

“The success of the fund-raising demonstrates that the UK remains an attractive market for private equity, notwithstanding current Brexit uncertainties."

Generally it makes sense to be prepared to invest when the prices of companies, technologies and patents are dropping towards the bottom. Preparing to buy cheap stocks, which one day will hopefully rise back up again.

 

Naturally while some companies are going come up few years after brexit. Some won't. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, oilinki said:

Generally it makes sense to be prepared to invest when the prices of companies, technologies and patents are dropping towards the bottom. Preparing to buy cheap stocks, which one day will hopefully rise back up again.

Of course, everyone knows this, even non-investors.

 

But I think Forbes' recent assessment of the UK as the number 1 country for business provides a more complete and well reasoned explanation.

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2018/12/19/the-best-countries-for-business-2019-u-s-down-u-k-on-top/#149805f452d5

 

Also a few weeks ago I posted figures for recent inward investment for the major EU economies. I can't recall the exact figures offhand, but the UK was way ahead in the number 1 spot.

 

By the way, the FTSE midcap has less exposure to the EU than the FTSE 100. That's one reason why business execs from 200 medium size enterprises recently wrote to May advising her to take a WTO exit. I've posted this twice already in the last few weeks.

 

 

 

Edited by My Thai Life
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23 minutes ago, My Thai Life said:

Of course, everyone knows this, even non-investors.

 

But I think Forbes' recent assessment of the UK as the number 1 country for business provides a more complete and well reasoned explanation.

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kurtbadenhausen/2018/12/19/the-best-countries-for-business-2019-u-s-down-u-k-on-top/#149805f452d5

 

Also a few weeks ago I posted figures for recent inward investment for the major EU economies. I can't recall the exact figures offhand, but the UK was way ahead in the number 1 spot.

 

By the way, the FTSE midcap has less exposure to the EU than the FTSE 100. That's one reason why business execs from 200 medium size enterprises recently wrote to May advising her to take a WTO exit. I've posted this twice already in the last few weeks.

 

 

 

I don't see how that's possible given the huge regulatory burden that you claim the EU imposes on British business. And how do Sweden at Number 2 and the Netherlands at number 4 manage it?

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, bristolboy said:

I don't see how that's possible given the huge regulatory burden that you claim the EU imposes on British business. And how do Sweden at Number 2 and the Netherlands at number 4 manage it?

I don't claim a huge regulatory burden, it's a fact which is available to anyone who can use google. But I'll give you a general hint. A custom union is the most advanced kind of Trade Agreement yet devised by capitalism. I'll assume that the benefits are reasonably well known. But the disbenefits are not so well known: (1) a huge regulatory burden for member nations (how else can diverse national standards be harmonised) (2) a loss of sovereignty for member nations (3) the enforcement of external (3rd country) tariffs which (i) do not suit all members (ii) support inefficient practices (CAP) (Iii) destroy or seriously undermine some developing nations (I'm sure that you as a "progressive" wouldn't approve of that if you knew more about it) (4) the inability to sign independent FTAs. These disbenefits do not include the disbenefits that many people see in the Single Market, which is a separate topic that I won't go into in detail.

 

I don't understand what you're trying to say in your 2nd sentence. I have no business or personal experience of the Nordics (apart from a girlfriend or two), but I do know that Sweden's population is less than London's. As for the Netherlands, I have visited many times, even set up offices and businesses there. It's an extremely easy place to do business: the Dutch combine the creativity of the British with the process orientation of the Germans and the liberalism of London (my home town): the Netherlands is a truly great place in my experience.

 

 

 

 

Edited by My Thai Life

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, vogie said:

Or even 'too many crooks spoil the broth' or something like that.🤔

 

the more cooks the more spill

 

as we say in Yorkshire

 

Edited by melvinmelvin

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