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BANGKOK 16 February 2019 01:38
rooster59

Five killed as car hits tree in Sukhothai

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4 hours ago, John P Ryke said:

point taken, so you think a couple should be reported as a heterosexual couple...that would be the equivalent as a gay couple....

Police learned from Nillakarn's relatives that the gay couple drove Nillakarn's parents and aunt from Tambon Dong Khu to join a merit making rite at the house of Saranyu's sister in Tambon Sarajit. They stayed there until late at night before they drove the parents and aunt home.

why is the word gay in describing the couple necessary.....is every heterosexual couple going to be described in this manner now.

imagine that was a boyfriend girlfriend in the front seat, the report would then read.....

Police learned from Nillakarn's relatives that the heterosexual  couple drove Nillakarn's parents and aunt from Tambon Dong Khu to join a merit making rite at the house of Saranyu's sister in Tambon Sarajit. They stayed there until late at night before they drove the parents and aunt home.

i don't think so

 

 

Hello Mr Ryke. Thank you for reading my comment and for taking the trouble to post a long reply.

 

The words ‘gay couple’ are used because that’s what they are: a gay couple. 

 

As of 2018, the word ‘couple’ implies a heterosexual relationship. If they had been boyfriend, girlfriend, then adding the word ‘hetrosexual’ would have been superfluous. 

 

But the English language is very flexible. Over the coming years and decades, it may well be that the word ‘couple’ will become more inclusive and will come to embrace the whole spectrum of human sexuality. 

 

Indeed, word meanings do change and broaden. 

 

When I was at school, a long time ago, we had words like ‘authoress’, ‘poetess’, and ‘manageress’. These are now redundant words; the masculine form is always used instead.

 

Today, the word ‘actress’ implies a young ‘airhead’, who is always happy to take her clothes off in front of the camera. Helen Mirren, Vanessa Redgrave, Judi Dench today are all actors: 

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls004660971/

 

It’s the same with word ‘heroine’. These days, it implies a woman who needs a man in her life to get out of trouble. Remember the old silent movies where the Dick Dastardly type character ties the poor helpless girlie, who had swooned when he kidnapped her, to a railway line. And then along comes the handsome hero, a George Clooney lookalike, in the nick of time to save her.

 

These days, young women want Lara Croft type characters who are not afraid to kick men’s a**es. 

 

Mariah Carey led the way back in 1993 when she co-wrote the song ‘Hero’.

 

 

 

 

So, be patient. I am sure given enough time the word ‘couple’ will broaden its meaning and become more inclusive. It would be nice if that were to happen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, silver sea said:

 

 

Hello Mr Ryke. Thank you for reading my comment and for taking the trouble to post a long reply.

 

The words ‘gay couple’ are used because that’s what they are: a gay couple. 

 

As of 2018, the word ‘couple’ implies a heterosexual relationship. If they had been boyfriend, girlfriend, then adding the word ‘hetrosexual’ would have been superfluous. 

 

But the English language is very flexible. Over the coming years and decades, it may well be that the word ‘couple’ will become more inclusive and will come to embrace the whole spectrum of human sexuality. 

 

Indeed, word meanings do change and broaden. 

 

When I was at school, a long time ago, we had words like ‘authoress’, ‘poetess’, and ‘manageress’. These are now redundant words; the masculine form is always used instead.

 

Today, the word ‘actress’ implies a young ‘airhead’, who is always happy to take her clothes off in front of the camera. Helen Mirren, Vanessa Redgrave, Judi Dench today are all actors: 

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls004660971/

 

It’s the same with word ‘heroine’. These days, it implies a woman who needs a man in her life to get out of trouble. Remember the old silent movies where the Dick Dastardly type character ties the poor helpless girlie, who had swooned when he kidnapped her, to a railway line. And then along comes the handsome hero, a George Clooney lookalike, in the nick of time to save her.

 

These days, young women want Lara Croft type characters who are not afraid to kick men’s a**es. 

 

Mariah Carey led the way back in 1993 when she co-wrote the song ‘Hero’.

 

 

 

 

So, be patient. I am sure given enough time the word ‘couple’ will broaden its meaning and become more inclusive. It would be nice if that were to happen.

 

 

 

 

 

 


It seems completely unnecessary to mention 'gay couple'... its clumsy, almost as if the reporter is subliminally implying something else by adding this little droplet of additional information, perhaps reasoning for the crash... 

 

An intelligent report would have just referred to them as 'the Pair'.... or 'the couple'.... 

 

That said, its hardly anything to get upset or wound up about... its just clumsy reporting and very much par for the course here...

 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:


It seems completely unnecessary to mention 'gay couple'... its clumsy, almost as if the reporter is subliminally implying something else by adding this little droplet of additional information, perhaps reasoning for the crash... 

 

An intelligent report would have just referred to them as 'the Pair'.... or 'the couple'.... 

 

That said, its hardly anything to get upset or wound up about... its just clumsy reporting and very much par for the course here...

 

 

 

 

Hello Mr Smith,

 

Thanks for your comments on my post.

 

The opening sentence of paragraph 1 begins: ‘A man was killed along with his boyfriend, parents and aunt...’ So how can the use of the words ‘gay couple’ in paragraph 6 of a 7 paragraph report be ‘additional information’? 

 

How can the use of ‘gay couple’ be subliminally implying ‘reasoning for the crash’? I don’t understand what you mean; you will have to explain that one. They were with the front seat passenger’s parents and aunt.

 

It sounds like it had been a happy family occasion with plenty of liquid refreshment. Sadly, the driver was probably too drunk to control the car properly on the way home.

 

The news report seems fair to me, but as you say ‘it’s hardly anything to get upset or wound up about.’ 

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