Jump to content
BANGKOK 24 January 2019 11:28
SamSanuk

Tea vs. Coffee

Recommended Posts

I’ve noticed that a cup of tea is generally 10-20 baht more than coffee in some of the places I frequent. 

 

Is it a function of more coffee drinking, hence a lower price? Cheaper for beans? 

 

One shop buys Twinnings from the store, and makes a nice profit from individual sales.

 

Just curious....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, FolkGuitar said:

Here are some figures, all taken as 'average US mid-west' based on USFDA charts.

1 lb tea - $100.00  -  makes 200 cups approx.

1 lb coffee - $5.00 -  makes 48 cups approx.

.50 to brew a cup of tea

vs.

.10 for a cup of coffee

 

Thanks for the info.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

Tea bags are 175bht for 100, and you can use each bag twice. 1bht/drink

3 in 1 coffee is 3bht/packet

 

So coffee should be 3x the price of tea.

 

That’s what I thought....Tea is usually cheaper than Coffee back in the States. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, SamSanuk said:

.50 to brew a cup of tea

vs.

.10 for a cup of coffee

 

Thanks for the info.

 

But... the cost of production, per pound, is the real kicker..

Coffee averages $1.33 USD per pound to produce.

Tea averages $1.27 USD to produce.

The retail pricing on both has little to do with the cost of production.

In fact, one connoisseur paid $28,000 USD for just 20g of Da Hong Pao tea. 

Perhaps the world is still trying to recoup losses from the 'Boston Tea Party,' in which 46 tons of tea were dumped into Boston Harbor.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Twinings is expensive . I seem to remember a couple of hundred baht for 25 sachets. 

The quality of tea (Indian) has dropped drastically although brand name is the same. The most palatable and best value is the Tesco brand at Lotus. About 100 baht for a pack of 50

lipton and dilmah both taste as though they have been made out of leftover tea bits swept off the floor.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, ChakaKhan said:

I use one tea bag and make a pot with it....as I dont drink it too strong   I never drink coffee....teatime!!!!

 

1

I think this is a throwback to England in the 1950s.

 

My grandma would keep a pot on the go all day. Every now and again putting in a spoonful of tea. At the end of the day, the tea was strong. Next morning the tea grouts would be chucked out and fresh put in.

 

Of course, tea-bags had not yet been invented then. In fact, the first time I ever came across a tea-bag was in Germany in 1975 (July) and we English thought it funny that the Germans couldn't get their heads around loose tea.

 

But returning to the quoted post: could you be more specific on "make a pot". What tea-bag do you use ChakaKhan, and how many CM3 is the pot (roughly), how long do you leave the bag in and do you use sugar (white, brown or black) or honey or even molasses. Do you even sweeten it at all? Have you ever tried putting the bag in cold water and boiling it up that way? Is the pot porcelain or metal or glass even.

 

When I left home and made my way in the world I stayed at digs up north. For brekkies they did porage,,,,, but put in salt!!! I kik you not. Absolutely horrid. Can still taste that first mouthful.

 

What about adding ginger in your tea; or ginseng? I find that a cuppa with added ginger or/and ginseng (once in the evening) works wonders in the love department.

Edited by owl sees all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imho, tea is one hell of a racket.  Wayyyyy overpriced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cmsally said:

 About 100 baht for a pack of 50

lipton and dilmah both taste as though they have been made out of leftover tea bits swept off the floor.

 

 

The tea that is used for tea bags IS at the lowest level of tea, called 'fannings.'  This is why real tea connoisseurs always request loose-leaf tea. The depth of flavor is severely lacking. If you were to buy Twinings 'English Breakfast' tea as loose-leaf, and buy it as already bagged, and tasted the two side by side, you'd never want to buy their tea bags again. This is true of 90% of the branded teas. That said, there ARE a couple of companies that do not use Fannings in their tea bags; 'Jackson of Picadilly,' 'Taylors of Harrogate,' and 'Yorkshire' being the three most well known.

For convenience sake, may people will buy loose-leaf tea, and bag their own, using packages of empty tea bags bought in Japanese and Chinese markets. Here in Chiang Mai, you can purchase empty tea bags at any of the 'Daiso' stores  (Nim City, Airport Plaza, Central Festival, etc.) While not a good as a large infuser (some say the small bags inhibit free flow of water around the leaves which is why fannings are used in commercial bagged tea,) they are certainly convenient!

 

 

1 hour ago, owl sees all said:

Of course, tea-bags had not yet been invented then. In fact, the first time I ever came across a tea-bag was in Germany in 1975 (July) and we English thought it funny that the Germans couldn't get their heads around loose tea.

 

With all due respect, tea bags first hit the scene around the turn of the 20th century. Here is more than you ever wanted to know about tea bags....

A tea importer named Thomas Sullivan created the first ones out of silk, to use as samples to give to his customers. Patents for tea bags began showing up in 1903. William Hermanson invented heat-sealed paper tea bags and sold his patent to the Salada Tea Company in 1930.

In 1944, the typical shape of the tea bag was revised from the 'sack' style of bag to the currently common rectangular style of tea bag. In 1952, Lipton Tea company patented the so-called "flo-thru" bag, which has four sides instead of two and which was intended for those who were brewing in mugs rather than small teacups.

 

One final note... For those who really appreciate fine tea, the English Breakfast tea sold a 'Viang Joom On' tea shop on Charoenrat Rd. has some of the best I've tasted. They have quite a large variety of teas, especially 'flavored teas which I don't care for, but their straight teas, although quite expensive, are worth the price!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought some Pu'er in a small shop near Yaowarat road. Fabulous!

 

Did you know Zeks used to get high off tea in the Gulag?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×