Jump to content
BANGKOK 24 January 2019 12:02
webfact

British PM May survives party confidence vote but 117 dissent

Recommended Posts

British PM May survives party confidence vote but 117 dissent

By Kylie MacLellan, Elizabeth Piper and William James

 

2018-12-12T210721Z_1_LYNXMPEEBB1WT_RTROPTP_4_BRITAIN-EU.JPG

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrives back at 10 Downing Street, in London, Britain December 12, 2018. REUTERS/ Eddie Keogh

 

LONDON (Reuters) - Prime Minister Theresa May survived a confidence vote from her Conservative party on Wednesday, but more than a third of her lawmakers said she was no longer the right leader to implement Britain's exit from the European Union.

 

Britain's March 29 exit has been plunged into crisis by parliamentary opposition to the divorce deal she struck with the EU last month, which has opened up possibilities including a delay to Brexit or even another referendum on membership.

 

May on Monday cancelled a parliamentary vote on her Brexit deal, designed to maintain close future ties with the bloc and agreed after two years of negotiations, after it became clear she would lose it badly.

 

Eurosceptic critics of the deal within her own party triggered a no-confidence vote in her leadership hours after she returned from talks with European leaders aimed at winning additional assurances about her deal.

 

After two hours of voting in Committee Room 14 in the House of Commons, Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of Conservative backbenchers, said 200 Conservative lawmakers had voted in support of May as leader, and 117 against, indicating her party was bitterly divided over the direction of Brexit.

 

Supporters said the result showed the party should now get behind her. But the hardline Brexit supporters who triggered the vote because they saw her deal as a betrayal of the 2016 referendum said she should now quit.

 

"It is a terrible result for the prime minister," Jacob Rees-Mogg, leader of a hard Brexit faction in the party, told BBC Television. "The prime minister must realise that, under all constitutional norms, she ought to go and see the queen urgently and resign."

 

But May loyalist Chris Grayling, her transport minister, said the party had endorsed her "comfortably".

 

ENDANGERING BREXIT?

May, who voted to remain in the EU in the 2016 referendum, had warned opponents of her withdrawal deal - struck after two years of negotiations - that if they toppled her, Brexit would be delayed or stopped.

 

Shortly before the vote, May sought to win over wavering lawmakers by promising to step down before the 2022 election.

 

Brexit is Britain's most significant political and economic decision since World War Two. Pro-Europeans fear the departure will weaken the West as it grapples with the U.S. presidency of Donald Trump and growing assertiveness from Russia and China.

 

The outcome will shape Britain's $2.8 trillion economy, have far-reaching consequences for the unity of the kingdom and determine whether London keeps its place as one of the top two global financial centres.

 

Supporters of Brexit admit there may be some short-term pain for Britain’s $2.9 trillion economy, but say it will prosper in the long term when cut free from the EU, which they cast as a failing German-dominated experiment in European integration.

 

May, 62, won the top job in the turmoil that followed the 2016 EU referendum, where Britons decided by 52 percent to 48 to leave the EU. She promised to implement Brexit while keeping close ties to the bloc, to heal a divided nation.

 

Sterling jumped as high as $1.2672 <GBP=D3> as the result came in but then fell to $1.2605, still up 1 percent on the day, after it emerged that the number of lawmakers who had voted against May was higher than many in the markets had expected.

 

(Writing by Michael Holden and Guy Faulconbridge; Editing by Mark John and Kevin Liffey)

 
reuters_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright Reuters 2018-12-13

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, melvinmelvin said:

what now

 

will the deal be put to parliament for voting?

 

If that is the deal she is wedded to -- then yes it should -- and it should be a confidence motion.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if Labour put forward a non-conf motion in parliament, 

would she survive that?

 

guess her support from own party would increase if it was in parliament

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, bkkcanuck8 said:

In Canada that result would likely mean the leader of the party would resign.  The precedent was set by "Joe Clark" of "Progressive Conservative" party -- who received 70% and then after receiving such a poor review -- and called a full leadership contest (which he participated and lost). 

Simply put, receiving 63% confidence in you from your own party where it is just a stay or go question -- is actually quite a horrible result. 

Got any other exciting precedents from Canada?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, melvinmelvin said:

what now

will the deal be put to parliament for voting?

 

1 hour ago, bkkcanuck8 said:

If that is the deal she is wedded to -- then yes it should -- and it should be a confidence motion.

It should be this, it should be that....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, bkkcanuck8 said:

In Canada that result would likely mean the leader of the party would resign.  The precedent was set by "Joe Clark" of "Progressive Conservative" party -- who received 70% and then after receiving such a poor review -- and called a full leadership contest (which he participated and lost). 

 

Simply put, receiving 63% confidence in you from your own party where it is just a stay or go question -- is actually quite a horrible result. 

The party is so divided if there were leadership contest I doubt any other contender could get 50%

 

2 hours ago, tebee said:

Thatcher resigned when she only got 204 votes in her favour.

 

TM claims 200 as a great victory for her.

 

Brexit has lowered the standards in public life yet again. 

Yes, 204 out of 356 that is 57% 

Just more Brexiteer bull s#!t try to muddy the water with misleading facts.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My crystal ball says that May will aim to get the wording clarified (added flexibility on UK options) on the Irish backstop with the EU, and then give that a chance to cool down over Xmas before holding the vote on her deal early January, when MP's are recovering from a festivities overload, and in no mood to contest another debacle. I'm pretty sure that parliament will approve her deal by a narrow margin, as it's in no-ones interest (apart from the hard Brexiteers) to have a no-deal scenario.

 

It's going to be knife-edged, though, IMO.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×