Jump to content
BANGKOK
rooster59

Video: Last moments of motorcyclist as 18 wheeler flees the scene

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, keith101 said:

Was the truck overtaking the motor bike or did the bike try to cut up the inside of the truck as so many do ?

Just saw the video of the bike trying to overtake the truck on the inside which was a major cause of this accident .

from what i saw the motor bike was under taking on the inside which in the UK is against the highway code so i see the bike rider in the wrong however there was enough room for the bike to move over when he saw that xxxxxxxxxxx big lorry. but these people dont see anything going on around them. very sad.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, keith101 said:

Was the truck overtaking the motor bike or did the bike try to cut up the inside of the truck as so many do ?

Just saw the video of the bike trying to overtake the truck on the inside which was a major cause of this accident .

100 % agree with you, what was the idiot on the bike thinking trying to overtake a semi going around a left corner on the left side. In my opinion, it is the bike riders own fault. I doubt that the driver of the truck even knew he had ran over the bike considering the weight difference, however since he says he didn't intend to flee the scene, I guess he must have.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bike should've ridden defensively and let the lorry pass first because it's common sense. many accidents happen this way when bikes try to squeeze. This is Thailand and the standards of driving are very poor by turning cars and lorries, therefore it would be smart to drive or ride defensively.

Edited by Thunder26
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the UK this kind of riding or driving is known as undertaking for obvious reasons....!!!


But those stupid cyclists, especially in London still do it, quite a few have been killed undertaking trucks etc, that are turning left.

Sent from my SM-G920F using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The motorbike may have been on the hard shoulder, but he was "undertaking" and whilst  that is not against the law on a dual carriageway it is the height of stupidity to undertake a truck and trailer on a bend

 

The truck did stop, and the driver got out -took a look, then drove off.

 

I do not believe the truck driver was to blame for the accident, but failing to stop after an accident (and he was fully aware) should be heavily punished with a prison sentence IN ALL CASES!

Edited by prakhonchai nick
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impressive how everyone rushes to try and assist the motorcyclist..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Nong Khai Man said:

LOOK AGAIN.....The Motorcyclist was in the correct position,It was the CLOWN Driving the truck ( Cutting the Corner ) who was at Fault....

The motorcyclist was 1, undertaking the truck (not advisable with a bend approaching) and 2, the motorcyclist was driving on the Hard Shoulder, which is not a legitimate driving lane and he should not have been there. The truck driver did cross the white line, but there should not, under any circumstances, been anyone driving on the inside at that point. A very sad accident, with blame on both sides.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyways, it has nothing to do with the accident per se... but the 'fleeing from the scene of an accident' 

 

 

do truckies there these days ever carry that sign on the rear:

"If you cannot see my mirrors, I cannot see you"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Kerryd said:

It is quite clear that the motorcycle was 100% at fault (and yes, I am a bike rider).

For starters, the shoulder is NOT a "traffic" lane. It is the "shoulder". By rights (and law) the scooter should NOT have been riding on there at all (despite how almost everyone does it regardless).

However the scooter driver, after starting out in the middle of the shoulder, for some reason keeps going straight until he is at the right edge of it, as it starts to curve to the left and he was nearing the front of the truck. It is actually the scooter that makes contact with the truck, causing the scooter to crash.
 

The truck had his signals on and barely touched the white line dividing the left lane from the shoulder. Even if he noticed the scooter in his mirror, he would have (rightly) expected it to stay to the middle or left side of the shoulder like most people do. There is virtually no way the loaded truck/trailer could have avoided that accident at all.

When I watched that video, I got the impression that the scooter rider was trying to overtake the truck and cut in front of him, as though he thought the truck was going to go straight and stop at the lights.

The way he moved from the middle of the shoulder to the right side as he got close to the front of the truck made me think that he was thinking that the truck wasn't going to turn (even though his signal lights were on) and the scooter rider was going to try and squeeze ahead of him so that he'd be first at the lights going across the intersection.

You can see the scooter going straight, then the brake light comes on (on the scooter) but he doesn't start turning until he's almost on the white line and realizes the truck is turning. The brake light goes off and he starts to go left but it's too late. His momentum causes him to brush the truck and he's a goner.

 

Obviously the truck driver should have pulled over immediately, and should get nailed for leaving the scene of an accident (or the Thai equivalent of that), but the accident itself wasn't his fault.

This kind of thing happens so often, every day, all over the country. It's not a surprise that Thailand is usually in the top 2 for traffic accidents/fatalities in the world year after year.


 

 

 

 

A good assessment Kerry and as a rider myself I completely agree with you. I've now seen 3 videos on this forum where death has been the result of riding in the shoulder lane, at least too far over on the left and getting 'boxed in'. And, like all of us, I've seen many close shaves as a result of this dangerous practice.

 

Unless I'm passing another vehicle, I ride smack in the middle of the left hand lane and absolutely refuse to move into the so called 'motorcycle lane'. Which it isn't. It's too damn dangerous in there.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, BritManToo said:
16 minutes ago, Kerryd said:

For starters, the shoulder is NOT a "traffic" lane.

 

3 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

You're wrong, in Thailand it's a bicycle and m/c lane.

And also a 'parking lane' and a chug along tuk tuk lane and a ghost rider's lane.

 

Whether it is a legal riding lane is very much debatable, but it's certainly not a safe place to be.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took long enough for anyone to check on the cyclist? Then how many took a look and took off. Yes he may have been dead already ...... but

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How ever many times you view the video, the biker was to blame for his own death.

The trucker did nothing wrong, apart from flee the scene. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry that the motorcyclist made a mistake that ended very, very badly for him. This is a common mistake by most motorcyclists in this part of the world, not just Thailand. Why do they need to undertake, or be inside the turn of a turning vehicle? That's the wrong place to be, no matter how one looks at it.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...