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Mum's 'relief' as £60k raised to bring injured daughter home from Thailand after horrific accident

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17 hours ago, possum1931 said:

Insurance companies are all the same, greedy capitalists who try every method they can not to pay out claims.

Your next insurance policy should be a socialist one then.

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13 hours ago, Hummin said:

Then I assume you have seen your share of stupidity in Thailand by back packers, and other visitors. You still claim if at bar, jumping in to first and best swimmingpool head first drunk, still qualify to get full payment from your insurance company? 

 

It is the same if you claim your insurance after drunk driving if you ask me. 

She should pay the insurance company a reimbursement for wasting their time investigating for her reckless act...

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An addition to my earlier post. I still can't find anything that says that damage to the C5,6 or 7 vertebrae will cause paralysis.

 

 

 

Quote

 

Fracture treatment
Treatment for the vertebral fracture will typically include non-surgical care, such as rest, pain medication, use of heat or ice for local pain, and slow return to mobility. Surgery may also be advisable. The two most common types of surgery for this type of fracture are vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Both types of surgery can help the fracture heal.

Vertebroplasty. This minimally invasive treatment is designed to help reduce or eliminate pain caused by a fractured vertebra and stabilize the bone. Low viscosity cement is injected directly into the collapsed vertebral body under high pressure, with the goal of stabilizing the fracture and relieving the associated back pain.

Kyphoplasty. Similar to vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure designed to reduce or stop the pain caused by a spinal fracture, to stabilize the bone, and to restore some or all of the lost vertebral body height due to the compression fracture.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Rally123 said:

An addition to my earlier post. I still can't find anything that says that damage to the C5,6 or 7 vertebrae will cause paralysis.

 

 

 

 

You clearly have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.

So you are a surgeon? No just somebody prattling on about something you have no idea about.

So you are saying my damaged 4th 5th vertebrae, are not related to my paralysis, BS.

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4 minutes ago, colinneil said:

So you are a surgeon? No just somebody prattling on about something you have no idea about.

 

And you know that for sure???? Nah, I don't think so. Now go follow someone else. I didn't notice 'Sheryl' disproving my 'diagnosis'/ 'prognosis' 

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2 minutes ago, Rally123 said:

And you know that for sure???? Nah, I don't think so. Now go follow someone else. I didn't notice 'Sheryl' disproving my 'diagnosis'. 

I had ACDF surgery, in and operated on, within 8 days in a Government hospital.

The spinal specialist advised me that had I left it any later I would have been paralysed.

I think he knows quite a bit more about the cervical spine than you do.

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An addition to my earlier post. I still can't find anything that says that damage to the C5,6 or 7 vertebrae will cause paralysis.  

 

 

 

 

Fracture treatment

Treatment for the vertebral fracture will typically include non-surgical care, such as rest, pain medication, use of heat or ice for local pain, and slow return to mobility. Surgery may also be advisable. The two most common types of surgery for this type of fracture are vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Both types of surgery can help the fracture heal.

Vertebroplasty. This minimally invasive treatment is designed to help reduce or eliminate pain caused by a fractured vertebra and stabilize the bone. Low viscosity cement is injected directly into the collapsed vertebral body under high pressure, with the goal of stabilizing the fracture and relieving the associated back pain. Kyphoplasty. Similar to vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure designed to reduce or stop the pain caused by a spinal fracture, to stabilize the bone, and to restore some or all of the lost vertebral body height due to the compression fracture.

 

 

 It is not the damage to the vertebra per se that does it but associated damage to the spinal cord. If the spinal cird is severed then patalysis is immediate and, at that level, will involve arms and legs (quadriplegia).

 

If the cord is not severed it may still be badly compressed by bone fragments and associated swellling. In this case prompt medical intervention may succeed in preventing total paralysis. Hopefully what occurred in her case. However there will usually have been some nerve damage that takes many months to resolve, or even be permanent.

 

Your comments re Colin -- who lost the use of his legs due to a spinal injury - are insensitive in the extreme.

 

 

Sent from my SM-J701F using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Sheryl said:

 It is not the damage to the vertebra per se that does it but associated damage to the spinal cord. If the spinal cird is severed then patalysis is immediate and, at that level, will involve arms and legs (quadriplegia).

 

If the cord is not severed it may still be badly compressed by bone fragments and associated swellling. In this case prompt medical intervention may succeed in preventing total paralysis. Hopefully what occurred in her case. However there will usually have been some nerve damage that takes many months to resolve, or even be permanent.

 

Your comments re Colin -- who lost the use of his legs due to a spinal injury - are insensitive in the extreme.

 

 

Sent from my SM-J701F using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

 

 

 

 

 

'comments re Colin -- who lost the use of his legs due to a spinal injury - are insensitive in the extreme.'

 

Too often that applies to any poor soul who by accident or otherwise happens to find themselves in a bad situation, and then by even worse misfortune also discovers their story has appeared on TV forums.

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4 hours ago, Sheryl said:

 It is not the damage to the vertebra per se that does it but associated damage to the spinal cord. If the spinal cird is severed then patalysis is immediate and, at that level, will involve arms and legs (quadriplegia).

If that was the case with this woman then she'd be wearing a full neck brace, see picture. Not a soft collar you'd put on someone with a stiff neck. Plus she's practically sitting up. It's all wrong.

 

Image result for neck brace for severed spinal cord                                             0_sophie-wilson.jpg

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4 hours ago, Thaiwrath said:

I think he knows quite a bit more about the cervical spine than you do.

So you know me do you? What has ADCF surgery got to do in this case. She never went through it. I think the problem in this case is that, having read the small print of the insurers, she had an accident and failed to get the consent of the insurers before booking into her private hospital. The insurers have the right to select the hospital. Similar to your car insurers defining which garage you get your car repaired at. This case really has nothing to do the injury but the abuse of selecting an hospital before contacting her insurers.

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1 hour ago, Rally123 said:

If that was the case with this woman then she'd be wearing a full neck brace, see picture. Not a soft collar you'd put on someone with a stiff neck. Plus she's practically sitting up. It's all wrong.

 

Image result for neck brace for severed spinal cord                                             0_sophie-wilson.jpg

No. That collar is applied  only initially at scene of injury to avoid any further trauma in the course of moving the patient. It does not remain on permanently. .

 

Thee picture is taken some time after the injury.

 

Obviously, her spinal cord was nor completely severed as it states she has some sensation. It also states there is some limitation so one can infer some degree of nerve damage, hopefully temporary.

 

What on earth is the point you are trying to make?

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1 hour ago, Rally123 said:

So you know me do you? What has ADCF surgery got to do in this case. She never went through it. I think the problem in this case is that, having read the small print of the insurers, she had an accident and failed to get the consent of the insurers before booking into her private hospital. The insurers have the right to select the hospital. Similar to your car insurers defining which garage you get your car repaired at. This case really has nothing to do the injury but the abuse of selecting an hospital before contacting her insurers.

The stated issue is that the insurer considers the injury to be the result of a reckless act. Nothing to do with which hospital she was treated in or when the company was notified of the hospitalization, which took place under emergency conditions.

 

In an emergency the requirement for pre-authorization does not apply, one informs the insurance company as soon as possible afterwards. In no insurance policy that I have ever read is a person in a life or death situation, and/or unconscious, not allowed to receive immediate care under the policy.

 

Most insurance policies do not give the insurer the right to select the hospital, that is very unusual. Rather they set limits on reimbursement by type of expense. 

 

Read the links. None of these things you mention are the issue. The issue is that she dove into a (apparently shallow, or shallow end of) pool of some sort at a bar at night. The insurance company's position is that this was a reckless act and thus the consequences are excluded from coverage. The family has appealed that, and the Financial Ombudsman's  office will make a final determination on that. Which hospital has got nothing whatsoever to do with it (and the range of choice in that part of Thailand is very limited, especially for an injury of this type).

 

 

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The family think it is the insurance fault no pay out.she did the jumping drunk.but the family think everyone should help in donating.they should remortgage the house or anything else instead of begging.thks everyone for donating saves us the hassle of the remortgage.hope they see this thread and see what people think

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