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BANGKOK 21 July 2019 07:16

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I've tried unsuccessfully to grow a large variety of USA veggie seeds the last two years.

I've gotten some plants, but not many considering the number of seeds I planted. The only plant I've had any reasonable success with is okra, both Thai and American. Interestingly, my efforts at growing okra in Colorado have been friutless(!) because of the need for hot weather throughout the growing season.

 

I've tried both cool and warm weather varieties at different times throughout the year.

 

I've got cucumber plants started now (December) that are growing normally so far. Naturally that wouldn't work in Colorado right now. Both countries are in the northern hemisphere so the seasons aren't really upside down, but certainly staggered by a few months.

 

I tried them in 10 gallon pots with soil from sacks I bought at a pottery shop. Tried soil from two different shops with same results.

 

I originally, stupidly I guess, that most plants would grow all year here as long as they had soil, water, and sun.

 

Recently I've read that the photo period (length of day) may be more important than I thought.

 

To put it in perspective, I've gardened in America for over 40 years and have a large greenhouse behind my home in Colorado. I've been hugely successful without much effort in the past.

 

I've concluded that I am missing some crucial factor in my efforts in Thailand.

 

I would like to grow summer squash, tomatoes, green beans, sweet pepper, cucumbers, etc like I did at home. Maybe the American seeds are simply not suited to this climate.

 

Please advise on the right growing season for veggies you've had success with and possible sources of domestic seed.

 

Any ideas on major blunders I've made?

 

Thanks in advance for any help.

 

 

Sent from my SM-G930V using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

 

 

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This has the makings of a great thread.

 

I'll kick of with tomatoes. European cherry varieties do well and there is a chap soidog2 growing some great beefsteak toms and other varieties.

 

The season for toms here is start your seedlings Nov ready to plant out Dec/Jan. They (mine) don't like the rainy season April onwards.

 

There are better people on TVF who may correct what I've said.

 

If other posters could add to the list, we could end up with some sort of spreadsheet with veg & fruit, sowing and harvesting periods.....I think @djayz has started something like this. The sheet could be revised and reposted periodically.

 

 

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23 minutes ago, grollies said:

This has the makings of a great thread.

 

I'll kick of with tomatoes. European cherry varieties do well and there is a chap soidog2 growing some great beefsteak toms and other varieties.

 

The season for toms here is start your seedlings Nov ready to plant out Dec/Jan. They (mine) don't like the rainy season April onwards.

 

There are better people on TVF who may correct what I've said.

 

If other posters could add to the list, we could end up with some sort of spreadsheet with veg & fruit, sowing and harvesting periods.....I think @djayz has started something like this. The sheet could be revised and reposted periodically.

 

 

Hi Grollies, 

Rocketdog,

 

yes, the the start of a good thread. 

 

Re the soil you're using Rocketdog: IF it's the soil I think it is (from nurseries), it's really only good for starting seeds. There's practically no nutrients in it to support healthy plant growth (based on my personal experience only, no research done on this). You could use it for seeds and then repot the seedlings into good, nutrient rich soil. Alternatively, add plenty of compost to the above bagged soil. I use a good peat moss to start my seeds. It's considerably more expensive than the nursery soil in bags, but well worth it in my humble opinion.

 

Re the spreadsheet for planting what plants when: I can post that here in the next few days upon my return to Bangkok (don't have my laptop now). I also found a good spread sheet here a few months back, but can't remember which tread it's posted on. If I find it, I'll gladly post the link here (also in a day or two). 

 

From personal experience, I've found that certain vegetables will do well here one year, then a year later when I plant the same veggies again, I get completely different results! Strange. 

Edited by djayz
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@djayz, seems like there are not many gardeners left here in TVF, which is a shame.

 

Even the OP can't be bothered to keep the topic going.

 

@RocketDog. Why bother posting at all, unless the replies to date are so sodding boring?

Edited by grollies
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5 hours ago, grollies said:

@djayz, seems like there are not many gardeners left here in TVF, which is a shame.

 

Even the OP can't be bothered to keep the topic going.

 

@RocketDog. Why bother posting at all, unless the replies to date are so sodding boring?

Give it time - maybe it'll grow in popularity. 😉

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9 hours ago, djayz said:

Give it time - maybe it'll grow in popularity. 😉

Maybe we don't all live in Cha Am and so don't feel qualified to answer. A bit different from Isaan where I am.

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The mistake many of us make is in deciding that Thai varieties are rubbish and so bring seeds from back home. Some of the varieties you know may well grow here, I suggest that many will not. 

Tropical soils are notorious for having all nutrients washed out and this is part of the problem. Adding compost is good for the soil but will not add nutrients that weren't there in the first pace. My own soil is deficient in iron, possibly magnesium also, and is heavily alkaline. Without going to the expense of having a soil test done, I am guessing that I need to add either magnesium sulphate or iron sulphate, possibly both, thereby lowering the pH value to one which most plants will like.

I also have verticillium wilt in the soil... another problem, some plants just won't flourish.

So I tried, from Farang seed, chives, onions, tomatoes, aubergines, garden peas, jalapenos, tried planting potatoes and garlic, no success. 

Yard long beans, sweet corn, most herbs, ginger, Kabuk, China kale, and a lot of minor stuff grow OK but I am now concentrating on fruits (papaya, passion fruit, figs, pepper corn) and as I have a small garden, vegetables are becoming less important.

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